ESG in Conversation with ‘Coz’ at Pure Accelerate (Video)

John Colgrove (universally known as ‘Coz’) is one of the founders at Pure – that alone makes him interesting. But he also happens to be a genuinely interesting person; so when I got a chance to interview him at the recent Pure Accelerate event, naturally I took it. I wanted to avoid the obvious “tell us about the products, Coz” (if you want to know about the happenings at the company and the event, you can see ESG’s On Location video and other blogs by Bob Laliberte, Scott Sinclair, and Mike Leone)….and so instead in just 5 minutes or so we manage to touch on the motivation of the company founders, the satisfaction of Pure implementations that deliver real value to humanity and not just to balance sheets, and the future – or at least semantic longevity! – of the storage and data industries. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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CA’s BTCS2.0: Change Is The New Normal
Jun07

CA’s BTCS2.0: Change Is The New Normal

SANTA CLARA, Calif.: Determined to be the leading toolmaker for the software-enabled, data-driven, digital transformation business phenomenon that is reshaping the world, CA Technologies held its second annual Built to Change Summit to update analysts and journalists on where it is, and where it wants to go. At last year’s BTCS the venerable software developer (1976) detailed how it was transitioning from a $4-billion legacy software giant with relatively flat sales into a more agile and fast-growing DevSecOps vendor for the the rapidly emerging DT world. Fast-forward 11 months and the company reported quarterly and annual revenue increases to $1.083 billion and $4.235 billion, respectively, and is forecasting relatively flat growth for the next quarter. In addition to its financials, CA also announced it would be laying off 800 (out of 11,000 employees) in restructuring, and adding another 500-600 staff with ‘different skills’. The company needs fewer employees with skills related to “legacy platforms” and more with skills related to software as a service, said CEO Michael Gregoire. While the company’s roots are in the mainframe, which is undergoing something of a renaissance, it is DevOps and more specifically DevSecOps where it’s future lies.Depending upon your source, DevOps is a flourishing market, especially in the enterprise. Forrester Research declared 2017 to be the year of DevOps with 50% of organizations implementing it, and 2018 will be the year of enterprise DevOps. ‘DevOps has reached “Escape Velocity”’, noted Principal Analyst Robert Stroud, with momentum occurring within all industry sectors but with healthcare, banking, insurance and manufacturing sectors leading the charge. In addition to forecasting a global DevOps software market in excess of $5.6 billion by 2021, IDC offered some interesting predictions that should sit well with CA’s DevSecOps ambitions, including: -cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning will become the fastest growing segments of software development by the end of 2018; by 2021, 90% of organizations will be incorporating cognitive/AI and machine learning into new enterprise apps -by 2019, over 70% of routine development-lifecycle tasks will be automated, supported by AI fed from existing data streams, with an agile DevOps pipeline driving and incubating lifecycle and application development intelligence; -by 2021, over 50% of CIOs will have appointed heads of delivery; integrated their dev, PMO, and ops groups; reduced silos; expanded their DevOps practices; and implemented shift-left testing to accelerate innovation; and, -development without integrated security and compliance will fail; progressive orgs have prioritized security due to uptime and compliance concerns, accelerating the need for agility and a curated OSS-dev portfolio. Security-led development will be a priority for 90% of orgs by 2020. 451 Research (together with security software testing...

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Intel Makes AI Understandable and Accessible…

Though they populate an industry that prides itself on tackling and solving complex puzzles, many IT vendors prefer simplistic story-telling. That’s partly due to simplicity being easier to sell than complexity, even if it fails to address many or even most of the issues related to complicated engineering efforts. But simple tales also feed the industry’s love of self-promotional mythologies, including the triumph and massive remuneration of plucky entrepreneurs. I raise this issue because storytelling shorthand also tends to infect areas where accuracy is a critical component, like still-emerging technologies. Keeping things easy may seem to be beneficial in terms of helping an audience initially understand difficult subjects. But relying on simplistic exposition can also mask over-inflated claims and promote questionable reports about a technology’s potential for commercial success. We’ve seen this dynamic occur many times in the past—virtual reality headsets and associated technologies are just one good example. More than four years after Facebook paid an unprecedented $2B for VR start-up Oculus—a deal that was supposed to rapidly propel VR into the commercial mainstream—the industry and vendors continues to be hindered by many of the same core technological barriers that existed in 2014. So, it’s a pleasure to find vendors that are willing and able to discuss complex work in both realistic and understandable terms. That was certainly the case at Intel DevCon 2018, the inaugural conference for artificial intelligence (AI) developers that Intel hosted recently in San Francisco. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Talking Cloud Cybersecurity…

In this discussion, part of ESG’s ongoing 360 Video Series, Doug Cahill talks about not just the intricacies of cloud security – both of applications for Saas models and of infrastructure for IaaS – but also the opportunities that doing cloud security well can afford a business. It’s not simply a matter of ever more “padlocks on doors” but rather is a matter of making cloud security part of an integrated process; this is especially crucial when so many organizations are essentially [at least to some degree] software developers, using approaches such as hybrid models and containers that can potentially expand the threat landscape if not pre-handled. IT has probably never been more complex and demanding than today: even as approaches such as convergence, myriad clouds, containers, and software-definition (etc.) seek to make operations simpler, so to a degree such elements can also obfuscate some of the underlying subtleties and opportunities of the foundational components. After all, while it’s great to focus on purchasing – for instance – application service levels or business outcomes, some understanding of the IT elements (and considerations or choices) that contribute to those is also often useful. That is the purpose of this video discussion series: it offers ESG’s subject matter experts discussing some of the key trends, drivers, and considerations across various IT areas. We aim to do it succinctly and to deliver it in engaging, plain English – while also tying each technology area back to its eventual potential to positively impact both IT and business results. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Qualcomm XR1: Finally Making Mixed Reality Viable

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR)—which we now call mixed reality—has had two very serious problems that I think could have been solved had the industry just approached this segment properly. Before we get to the Qualcomm XR1 platform and how it addresses those issues, though, I want to chat about how the industry messed up bringing this technology to market. The VR/AR Screw Up What is often find really annoying is when my industry tosses out everything we’ve learned about how to bring a new technology to the consumer market and then seems surprised when it doesn’t go well. Up until now VR/AR has been a huge disappointment in the consumer space. Google brought out Google Glass for AR which turned out to not only suck, it actually got some of the users beat up and called Glassholes. Then Facebook and HTC brought out expensive but sub-standard offerings with little content and seemed shocked their offerings didn’t sell well. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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