Lenovo Surfs “Three Wave” Strategy to Success

Consistency may be, as Emerson noted, the “hobgoblin of little minds,” but for performance-focused analysts and investors it can qualify as the difference between a company “walking the talk” and one muttering incoherently in an alleyway. Why is that the case? Partly because it helps clarify central points for market-watchers who hope future events can be prognosticated from today’s tea leaves. In other words, the more often and regularly a business achieves its goals, the more likely they are to repeat themselves. Plus, reaching or exceeding those touchstones also signals that a company and its leadership knows what they are about organizationally and in market terms. Those are good points to consider when examining Lenovo’s latest 2017/18 Fiscal Year Q3 earnings report and the light it casts on the company’s overall performance and market prospects. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Cybersecurity PTSD

According to ESG research, 51% of organizations report having a problematic shortage of cybersecurity skills in 2018. This is up from 45% in 2017. The cybersecurity skills shortage has multiple implications. Organizations don’t have the right sized teams and operate in a perpetually understaffed mode. Often, the cybersecurity team lacks some advanced skills in areas like security analytics, forensic investigations, or cloud computing security, putting more pressure on the most experienced staffers to pick up the slack. Finally, many organizations are so busy with day-to-day security operations that they have little time for ongoing cybersecurity training. According to research from ESG and the information systems security association (ISSA), 62% of cybersecurity professionals believe that their organization is not providing an adequate level of training for them to keep up with business and IT risks. Clearly the cybersecurity skills shortage is affecting organizations, but what’s often overlooked is the impact it has on the cybersecurity pros in the trenches. For example, the ESG/ISSA research indicates: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Is Intel Melting Down? Hardly.

Hang around high-tech, or any other industry long enough and you learn that headline-worthy bad news comes in mostly predictable flavors. There’s good old executive malfeasance, often complicated by breathtaking greed and/or egotism. Plus, don’t forget what might be called Stupid Employee Tricks which can range from simple misadventures to cluelessly earnest activities whose idiocy or sociopathology is utterly lost to those involved. To be fair, not all negative headlines are internally-created, so be sure to mention shady activities by associates, like contractors and partners. Then there’s faulty/broken technology news. It’s difficult to speak of these events generally since they can range from marginal quality or manufacturing issues to catastrophic device failures. But despite their scope, what happens and how issues are corrected can get to the very soul of a company. Why so? Because since those processes are often also controlled by executive fiat and board-level decision making, their impact on a company’s brand and core strategies can linger for months or years. However, in best case scenarios, direct, intelligent action can help resolve the problems far more quickly and effectively than might be expected. That brings us to the current situation with Intel and the design points reported early in January that make many of its chips susceptible to security exploits called “Meltdown” and “Spectre.” To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…Converged and Hyperconverged – Predictions for 2018

I was waiting on releasing my 2018 predictions for converged and hyperconverged infrastrucuture because I wanted to leverage a key data point from our recent spending intentions research. From an IT infrastructure standpoint, this year’s data had some particularly compelling data points regarding areas of opportunity where senior IT decision makers feel they can significantly streamline costs. More than half of organizations (54%) feel their on-premises storage and/or networking infrastructure is where their costs can be streamlined. My colleague Mark Peters recently wrote a great brief on the subject, but here is my quick take… This data can be interpreted differently, but here is my take. There is an immediate interpretation of streamlining costs by simply eliminating those costs – moving some infrastructure to the cloud, which can offer both CapEx and OpEx savings. It should be noted that in many cases, an on-premises infrastructure still exists, but it doesn’t have to be as large as it used to be. Looking just at the on-prem side of the hybrid approach, organizations will want to consolidate their physical footprint and they’ll want to make sure they do it cost-effectively while still meeting their application requirements. A bonus would be delivering a cloud-like experience so organizations can have a similar consumption model on-prem or in the cloud. What technology helps to fit the bill? Converged and hyperconverged infrastructures. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Dell/EMC Personalities Merge With VMware Gambit

Dell Technologies fascinate me largely because it is a very large merger that was not a near total disaster, in fact it was surprisingly well done largely because the two firms threw out the rule book. What fascinates me most is that that rather than being emulated by other firms, those firms seemed to look at Dell’s success, ignore it, and then went back to the flawed way of doing things. One thing I have been anticipating is a blending of strategic thinking between the firms. Dell seemed more creative and agile than EMC, but EMC seemed to be able to think out of the box, particularly when it came to customer care and organizational structure, better than Dell. But the idea that was floated in January that Dell Technologies would be acquired by VMware as a path to taking the joint firms public again reflects on the strengths of both firms. Whether it happens or not I think this is a very interesting development and one I also expect Dell’s competitors to ignore much like firms have ignored how Steve Jobs made Apple the most valuable company in the world. Let us talk about the VMware Gambit this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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