Dell EMC at University of San Diego…

Supporting and delivering IT services from remote data centers existed long before AWS was a twinkle in Jeff Bezos’ eye. Remote data centers have always played key roles in back-up and disaster recovery practices. Hosted services got a serious boost in the dot.com era as businesses began exploring the value of leveraging the Internet or proprietary networks for numerous business applications and processes. It can be and certainly has been argued that cloud computing is merely a new take on a very old subject. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it has probably helped legitimize cloud for some people who would have otherwise viewed AWS and other cloud providers with unwarranted skepticism. But is cloud as unreservedly beneficial to businesses’ capital outlays and operational processes as proponents claim? To read the complete article. CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM and AA – An Innovative Partnership Heads to the Cloud

In an IT industry that is both dynamic and frangible, an organization like IBM stands out. That’s partly due to its remarkable longevity which at a century and counting is more than two of its senior-most major competitors, HPE and Oracle, combined. But the company’s durability and its approach to computing innovation is also reflected in its relationships with customers and partners. Last week’s announcement concerning one of those customers – American Airlines (AA) – marked a notable strategic partnership and significant milestone for both organizations. Why notable? Because the agreement means that AA, the world’s largest airline (currently offering about 6,700 flights per day to nearly 350 destinations in more than 50 countries), has chosen IBM to be its cloud computing provider “for greater enterprise flexibility, scalability and reliability.” Why significant? Because the new deal is just the latest development in a partnership that dates back over six decades to the 1950s when AA and IBM developed the airline industry’s first electronic reservation and ticketing system. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Time to Stop Buying IT Hardware for Your Data Center

I recently attended AWS re:Invent, and while I have seen some pretty impressive business use cases that have bent their strategies toward the cloud, I walked away truly wondering why businesses would ever purchase a piece of IT infrastructure again. Let’s face it, managing IT infrastructure has been one of the most difficult and specialized jobs of IT, and most IT organizations do an amazing job at managing complex architectures, but why continue to do so? To read the complete article, CLICK...

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A Slimmer HPE Means There’s More to “Discover?”

As is now traditional, HPE follows the US Thanksgiving celebrations with its Discover event in Europe. Just last week thousands of loyal HPE users, potential users, and a bunch of market watchers turned up in London’s Docklands to hear what the company had to show and tell. Taking a hint from the [surprising] local weather, HPE sported a decidedly sunny disposition all week. Perhaps that’s to be expected after the HP split and the more recent – ongoing – spin-out/mergers of the software and services parts of the business. This is clearly a middle-aged company that has shed weight…the question now is how nimble and nifty it can be while remaining both valuable and invaluable to its customers. I add some extra commentary below, but first please take a look at the video blog I put together at Discover – a quick skim across a very large pond. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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HPE Switches IoT Focus To Enterprise

While not as critical as analyst Rob Enderle (i.e. Whitman Throws Trump and HPE Under The Bus) when it comes to Hewlett Packard Enterprise, I’ve done my share of HPE mud-slinging, but it looks like the shrinking company — which just got smaller (again) — is making some solid advances in critical markets, including IoT. Sandwiched between the sale of most of its OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets to Linux provider SUSE, and Monday’s unveiling of a micro data center (on wheels), the company made a number of announcements at HPE Discover London (November 29-December 1), including: HPE Mobile Virtual Network Enabler; HPE Universal IoT Platform; Aruba ClearPass Universal Profiler; and, Aruba 2540 Series Switches. A few months ago the company uncorked IoT in a Box, an all-in-one appliance designed to address IoT-at-the-edge applications. IoT is part of the IoE, Internet of Everything, that will deliver up to $19 trillion in value over the next decade. That’s a lot of devices/data to be connected, manipulated and value to be extracted, and doing it at the edge can enable organizations to become digital disrupters within their industries, said Dr. Tom Bradicich, VP&GM, Servers and IoT Systems, HPE. “It’s really a good time to be us.” IT Trends & Analysis spoke with HPE about the IoT announcements. “Iot is one of the top things customers are asking about,” said HPE’s Christian Gilby, Director of Product Marketing, Aruba. He was joined by Jeff Edlund, CTO Communications & Media Solutions, who added “I would want our customers to walk away saying to themselves wow, HPE has the partner system and ecosystem… I can start generating revenues in IoT right now.” The company said it is addressing the biggest barriers to IoT adoption, ‘cost-prohibitive economics’ and the ‘lack of a holistic solution’. By approaching IoT with a growing framework built on edge infrastructure solutions, software platforms and technology ecosystem partners, HPE is addressing the cost, complexity and security concerns of organizations looking to enable a new class of services that will transform workplace and operational experiences, it stated. In addition to its IoT additions, the company announced: the 3PAR Flash Now initiative, which gives customers a way to acquire all-flash technology on-premises starting at $0.03 per usable gigabyte per month; and, an expansion of its composable initiative with the addition of a new hybrid cloud offering and technology extensions to HPE hyper-converged systems. Analyst Patrick Moorhead, Moor Insights & Strategy, gave the company a passing grade for its efforts across the pond. ‘Overall, HPE did what it needed to do at Discover London and it’ll be good when the company churn stops and we...

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Dell Security Aims To Be One Step Ahead
Dec08

Dell Security Aims To Be One Step Ahead

It’s still too early to talk about Dell EMC’s security plans, said Brett Hansen, VP, Endpoint Data Security and Management, Dell, but he tells IT Trends & Analysis there is a lot of work going on behind the scenes on the future of the company’s post-merger enterprise security strategy. “I’m like a kid in the candy store with this acquisition.” What’s not to be excited about? Cybersecurity is getting a lot more attention — and customer budgets — and the acqusition brings together two sets of technology assets, skills and customer bases. While overall IT spending may be inching upward, security is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 8.3% through 2020, from $73.6 billion in 2016 to more than $100 billion. Other estimates put this year’s cybersecurity spend at $122.45 billion, and a 10.6% CAGR to $202.36 billion by 2021. EMC’s former security division, RSA (with more than 30,000 customers), will retain its autonomy, but will benefit from being part of the world’s largest privately controlled technology company, said president Amit Yoran in a September conference call. “RSA is now part of the broader Dell Technologies – a much broader platform that allows us to make decisions along private company timelines and horizons for a more strategic perspective, and less maniacally focused on the 90-day public company window,” he stated. “There is a natural upside [for enterprises] of having the broader ecosystem of Dell Technologies from a leveraging relationships standpoint.” He said authentication and identity, advanced security operations and analytics, and the business context and business drivers around those will continue to be the three key areas that RSA is focusing on. As for the unit’s R&D focus, he said in a world where there is no longer any perimeter, being able to identify who is where on what and provide them the appropriate access with strong multi-factor authentication and an elegant user experience “is a key area where RSA has great capability and we will continue to invest aggressively in R&D in that area”. In addition, it is investing heavily in advanced security operations, which includes RSA’s endpoint threat detection and response product Ecat, the NetWitness suite, and all the analytics around those. “Ultimately, context matters most to the organisation. What is mission-critical, what is business-critical, what is required from a compliance and regulatory perspective, and ensuring that the limited security resources are being spent on the most impactful and critical things for the enterprise,” said Yoran. In June, prior to the acquisition’s close, EMC announced the findings from its global enterprise backup survey, ‘Are You Protected?’, which included: -incidents of traditional data loss...

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