Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future
Apr20

Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future

Pretty much everybody agrees the world is moving to the cloud — public, private (which includes managed as a service) but predominantly the combination of both (hybrid) — and the primary questions are what to move where, and when (how is also a huge concern, but while not easy, it’s really just fiddly bits). Four years ago Cisco started using the concept of the ‘world of many clouds’ to describe its customer-choice model, and earlier this month data and analytics leader Teradata unveiled database license flexibility across hybrid cloud deployments. There has been an “aggressive uptick in interest, if not deployment of public cloud” by the company’s global 1000 customers, said Brian Wood, Director, Cloud Marketing, Teradata. He told IT Trends & Analysis that over 90% of their customers plan to have hybrid IT by 2020, and “85% want to consume as a service.” The company has 100 customers in the multi-petabyte range, with the largest customer in the 90Pb range, so licensing becomes critical, smoothing out the investments, he said. With portability, “ it’s have your cake and eat it too.” This massive move to the cloud, with a mix of public, private, hybrid and on-premise resources means portability — data, software and licenses — is a critical component. Cloud lock-in is no more palatable than vendor lock-in, and while only one vendor, with a limited set of offerings — albeit a set of significant offerings — Teradata says its newest capability, an industry first, gives its data management solution for analytics the ‘very best value proposition.’ “Not only is the database license portable across the hybrid cloud options, but so are workloads, enabled by a common code base in all deployments,” said John Dinning, EVP and Chief Business Officer, Teradata, in a prepared statement. “This flexibility is a first in our industry and means that data models, applications, and development efforts can be migrated or transferred unchanged across any ecosystem.” Looking ahead reinforces the growing cloud-first future, although this cloud shift is not just about cloud, stated Gartner. “This cloud-first orientation will continue to increase the rate of cloud adoption and, consequently, cloud shift,” said Ed Anderson, research vice president. “Organizations embracing dynamic, cloud-based operating models position themselves for cost optimization and increased competitiveness.” Spending on datacenter systems is forecast to be $175 billion in 2017, growing to $181 billion through 2020. However, while DC budgets will be relatively flat, spending on cloud system infrastructure services (IaaS) will grow from $34 billion in 2017 to $71 billion through 2020, account for 39% of total spending on datacenter systems. The latest market data/forecasts demonstrate the headlong rush to...

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Cybersecurity Remains an Elusive Business Priority

I’ve been remiss by not blogging earlier this year about ESG’s annual IT spending intentions research. The year 2017 continues to follow a pattern—cybersecurity is a high business and IT priority for most organizations. Based upon a global survey of 641 IT and cybersecurity professionals, the ESG research reveals: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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…Dell EMC World 2017: Is it One Company or Two?

Dell EMC World 2017, or DEW — which I honestly hope does not catch on as the acronym/nickname — is just around the corner. To prepare, I wanted to pull together a short summary of my expectations for the event. With this event taking place only a few months after the 2016 event in Austin, it is difficult to have high expectations in terms of new technology or a new product introduction. But honestly, I have reached the point with Dell EMC that I expect new technologies to be there when the market needs them. If there isn’t a ton to announce this year due to the short time between this event and the last Dell EMC World, I expect there will be a larger announcement next year. That being said, Dell EMC could certainly surprise me. The combined firm has a wealth of smart engineering talent, so if any company could produce a few new offerings that quickly, it would be Dell EMC. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Apple and the Dangers of Lock-In

I’m wading through the Qualcomm answer to Apple’s lawsuit against it and when I hit page 46 (item 4 bullet 4) I had an “oh crap” moment. Qualcomm is alleging that Apple is intentionally crippling certain iPhones so that users can’t tell they are using inferior parts in some of them. It seems Apple has gone to a dual-supplier model in an apparent attempt to force Qualcomm to drop its prices, but the second supplier apparently builds a significantly inferior product—so inferior in fact that even after Apple cripples the Qualcomm-based iPhones they’re still significantly better. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM & Anaconda… Cognitive Development

Solutions designed to reduce or eliminate complexity and risk are mainstays in the IT industry, especially when it comes to emerging technologies. The short and long term intentions of such efforts are pretty straightforward; by doing so, vendors aim to ease customers into trying on new offerings in hopes that the experience will result in future sales opportunities. That’s been the case with a number of efforts IBM has initiated around its Power Systems and technologies, including open sourcing its POWER processor architecture and helping to found the OpenPOWER Foundation with vendors interested in leveraging Power across a range of innovative new enterprise and data center solutions. But it’s also apparent in the company’s recently announced partnership with Continuum Analytics to offer its Anaconda Open Data Science platform on IBM’s POWER-based Cognitive Systems and to integrate Anaconda with the PowerAI distribution for machine learning. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually
Apr13

5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually

With almost 40 years of IT reporting experience under my — sadly expanded — belt I’ve covered a number of profound developments and countless others of less import, but the eventual emergence of 5G is expected to CHANGE EVERYTHING. Yes, 5G is just a bigger, faster pipeline, but to paraphrase POTUS, it’s going to be huuuuuge: speeds of 10 to 100 gigabits per second (1,000 times faster than the current US 4G average); latency of less than a millisecond (compared to 4G’s 40ms to 60ms); and support for a million connected devices per square kilometer [that’s 5/8th of a square mile for the metrically challenged]. 5G use cases include: Internet of Things (IoT); extreme video and gaming applications; explosive data density usage; public safety; Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) sunset; and context-aware services. User-driven requirements include: battery life; per-user data rate and latency; robustness and resiliency; mobility; seamless user experience; and context-aware network. And from the infrastructure perspective, network-driven requirements include: scalability; network capacity; cost efficiency; automated system management & configuration; network flexibility; energy efficiency; coverage; security; diverse spectrum operation; and, unified system framework. However it is very early in the hype cycle, with final standards 12-18 months away, and products and services expected to trickle out over the next couple of years. The market should become relevant by 2021-22, and there will be 1 billion 5G connections by 2025. So what does that mean to IT and CXOs today? “This is going to be a transformative change even though a couple of years away from mainstream adoption,” said Varun Chhabra, unstructured data expert at Dell EMC. He told IT Trends & Analysis it’s going to be a “gamechanger”. It will enable enterprises and businesses to provide their  customers with “a completely different way to engage with their brands.” While still a work in progress, 5G needs to be: a “chameleon” technology that can adapt to differing demands of wireless services — whether to support high bandwidth, low latency, bursty traffic, ultra-reliable services, or a combination of these capabilities, according to a recent report from the Telecommunications Industry Association. The TIA survey found that operators are uncertain how 5G might prove to be transformative, but while ‘history suggests that while it may underachieve relative to expectations in the short term, it will overachieve in the long term.’ As with any significant technology transition, there are billions of dollars being spent to either lead the change, or at least minimize the threat of being roadkill on the faster, broader information highway. Some proof points include: -5G commercial services will launch in 2020 and there will be 24 million 5G subscriptions...

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