…IoT Innovation Meets System Thinking

The growing interest in the Internet of Things (IoT) seems both natural and real to me. In the former case, IoT represents an evolutionary step ahead for numerous technologies, including digital sensors, wireless gateways, cellular networks and data center systems. In the latter, businesses looking for a competitive edge increasingly recognize and appreciate the potential benefits of IoT solutions. However, I also believe there are fundamental flaws in how people perceive IoT technologies and solutions. That’s largely due to how many IoT discussions are being driven and hyped by niche technologists and specialty vendors. While it’s true that they can provide valuable contributions to eventual solutions, their products often represent “micro” portions of offerings whose true impact requires taking a broader “macro” point of view. In fact, the most fully realized IoT visions are those that leverage “system thinking” to develop solutions with closely knitted, strategically integrated component parts and services. That’s one reason that Dell EMC’s recently announced NASCAR sponsorship of JTG Daugherty Racing is so intriguing. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Database Forecast: Cloudy with Increasing Chances

ESG has recently published an overview on IT market adoption of cloud-based databases. Shall we just call them cloudbases? Perhaps not. A major trend is emerging. While relatively few are choosing cloud as their primary mode of deployment, majorities are currently running at least some of their production workload in the public cloud. Attitudes and adoption vary considerably by age of company (and age of respondent!), reflecting how deeply entrenched traditional on-premises offerings and processes may be for different businesses. How many, how many, and how much, you ask? ESG research subscribers can read the full report here. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The New McAfee

I’ve worked with McAfee for a long time – from its independent days, during the Network Associates timeframe, through financial issues, back to McAfee and the go-go Dave DeWalt era, and finally as Intel Security. To be honest, Intel’s acquisition of McAfee was always a head scratcher for me. The 20-somethings on Wall Street crowed about Intel cramming McAfee security in its chip set but this made no sense to me – Intel had long added security (and other) functionality into its processors with lukewarm market reception. The two cultures were a mismatch as well. Ultimately it seems that Intel came to a similar conclusion and recently spun out McAfee in a private equity stew. So, what are the prospects for McAfee this time around? Like comedy, timing is everything when it comes to financial markets, customer demand, and market opportunity. The new McAfee starts its comeback in a robust $100 billion+ cybersecurity market where customers want help, vision, and leadership from their cybersecurity vendors. McAfee has a few real strengths it can deliver to this hungry market including: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Donald Trump Gives BlackBerry A Huge Boost, Again

John Chen, BlackBerry’s CEO, may have just become a much bigger fan of Donald Trump. You see when President Trump signed the executive order rolling back President Obama’s restrictions on ISP’s sharing of personal information he basically handed Blackberry, a Canadian firm, a huge advantage. You see BlackBerry differentiates in the market by securing, not sharing, customer data. In fact, they go to great lengths to ensure that this information is secure even from BlackBerry employees. Even when information access would be beneficial to the firm, like using it to improve products, they use an opt-in and not the more Industry standard opt-out format. It isn’t a surprise that most governments, including the US Government, prefers a Blackberry solution because of this but it is unusual for a sitting President to hand such a huge benefit to a firm not headquarter in the US. Let’s talk about that this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Karen Quintos, Dell and the Ultimate Differentiator

Specialization in the C-suite is becoming increasingly common, and a role that is starting to gain more visibility is the Chief Customer Officer (CCO). Still, only a small percentage of enterprises currently employ CCOs, and few, if any, business schools offer formal course tracks for the position. By their nature, successful business and business organizations must be customer-centric. So why would an organization need a senior executive and team that focuses solely on customers and customer relationships? To develop a better understanding of the CCO role, how it shapes business strategy and how it enhances an organization’s relationship with its customers and partners, I recently spoke with Karen Quintos, who became Dell’s EVP and CCO in 2016, and is also the company’s highest ranking woman executive. Quintos believes that customer relationships are the ultimate differentiator for companies in all industries. With this in mind, she took a unique approach to defining her CCO responsibilities. In addition to leading Dell’s customer advocacy and experience programs, she also has responsibility for Dell’s strategy and programs for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Diversity & Inclusion, and Entrepreneurship – business imperatives that she found really matter to customers. Quintos joined Dell in 2000 and held a number of VP positions before becoming the company’s SVP and CMO in 2010. Prior to Dell, Quintos was Citigroup’s VP of Global Operations and Technology. She also spent 12 years with Merck in marketing, operations and supply chain leadership positions. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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… Fixing The Critical Problem With Windows

I’ve been using the Windows 10 Creator’s Edition for some time now but most of the rest of you won’t see it until April 11th. It has a number of improvements not the least of which is significant new protections against phishing web sites in Edge, far better 4K HDR support for apps like Netflix, and up to 1.5 hours of extra battery life in existing laptops that migrate to in. It’ll arrive with new, more affordable, 3D headsets and apps that support them, significantly improved privacy and security features and controls, better game streaming, and a bunch of things that your IT folks will really appreciate with regard to management and control. But that all pales against the truly big change this represents, and that is a return to focusing on the user, something that Microsoft lost over the years, and with Creator’s edition, finally got back. Let me explain. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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