HPE InfoSight Brings Autonomous DC (i.e. Skynet) Closer
Dec07

HPE InfoSight Brings Autonomous DC (i.e. Skynet) Closer

The upcoming termination of Meg Whitman’s reign is not the only Big Bang due out of Hewlett Packard Enterprise early next year: in January the drastically slimmed-down enterprise IT powerhouse will roll out a 3PAR-enabled artificial intelligence recommendation engine (InfoSight AIRE) that will take HPE closer to the autonomous datacenter, according to company officials. “Infosight is AI for the datacenter,” HPE’s Gavin Cohen, VP, Product and Solutions Marketing, Storage, told IT Trends & Analysis. “That’s something Nimble started building on from the start.” HPE announced the completion of its $1.2 billion acquisition of Nimble Storage in April, and while that significantly beefed up its flash and cloud storage assets, the company said it would be leveraging InfoSight across both its storage and server portfolios. Calling InfoSight the “crown jewels” of the Nimble acquisition, the AI power of the platform provides HPE and its partners with a big competitive advantage against any and all competitors, said Meg’s CEO successor-to-be (as of  February 1) HPE President Antonio Neri. “Nobody has this,” he said in a recent interview. The predictive analytics capabilities are sure to power dramatic reductions in storage total cost of ownership (TCO) for businesses of all sizes, he said. “It delivers the best performance with the best uptime and lowest TCO optimized for the specific workloads that run on the platform. The customer gets the best experience at the lowest cost.” Beyond storage are servers and ultimately the datacenter, and bringing AI and predictive analytics to the datacenter is not only necessary for protecting existing revenue streams, but essential to the autonomous datacenter. While we hopefully won’t get a Skynet, Terminator’s rise (and fall) of the machines, AI in the datacenter is coming quickly. By 2019, 40% of digital transformation initiatives will use AI services; by 2021, 75% of commercial enterprise apps will use AI; and the majority of adopters have seen quantified returns meeting or exceeding expectations. “AI is a positive force for change,” stated Mark Purdy, Managing Director-Economic Research, Accenture Research. “It has the potential to markedly increase growth rates and substantially raise economic output across industries, while helping organizations to more easily rotate to the new way of doing business.” A recent survey found that AI could boost average profitability rates by 38% and lead to an economic increase of $14 trillion by 2035. But all that remains in the future; today, we have AI-powered storage, or at least Nimble, and shortly, 3PAR, and the benefits are equally compelling. The AI and predictive analytics capabilities of InfoSight reduce the time spent troubleshooting issues by up to 85% and help to deliver greater than 99.9999% of guaranteed...

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Dell: Disk Isn’t Dead But…
Jul22

Dell: Disk Isn’t Dead But…

If it was just about adding the latest media type – in this case SSDs based on Triple Level Cell 3D NAND technology – then Dell’s bragging rights for the lowest-cost enterprise flash would last just as long as it took for its flash storage competitors to jump on the TLC bandwagon. In other words, not very long. However Dell’s secret sauce – a virtualized storage array architecture that automatically leverages multiple flash types and hard drives in the same array based on workload goals and usage patterns – gives it a significant advantage over the competition that must offer less elegant, and more expensive, solutions. “Dell’s unique intelligent data placement strategy allows different types of flash storage — SLC, MLC and TLC — to be efficiently deployed in multiple tier architectures that can be more cost-effective than single tier flash-based arrays,” said Eric Burgener, research director, storage systems, IDC, in a prepared statement. “Dell’s announcement of flash drives built on TLC 3D NAND technology puts them in the storage density lead at 45TB per rack unit for flash-based arrays and drops the dollar per gigabyte cost of enterprise flash storage to roughly the same cost as 15K RPM HDDs — with significantly higher performance. Cost has been the single biggest stumbling block to flash adoption in the data center, and Dell’s announcement of a new lower dollar per gigabyte price point for all-flash configurations enables the use of flash technology across an even greater variety of enterprise workloads.” Due to ship next month, the Dell Storage SC Series arrays with TLC-based Mainstream Read-Intensive (RI) SSDs offer up to 24x performance improvement and the same price for capacity as 15K hard disk drives, and double the density – 90 terabytes of raw flash capacity per 2U array. The company can now offer SC4020 all-flash mid-tier solutions for as low as $1.66 per gigabyte and as low as $0.58 per gigabyte for typical mid-tier hybrid flash configurations, said Travis Vigil, Executive Director, Dell Storage. The $1.66/GB claim is based on an SC4020 with the raw capacity of (24) 3.8 TB Mainstream RI (TLC 3D NAND) drives. It includes comparing this 2U “all-in-one” solution (which includes dual controllers, core software, installation services and the typical industry 3-year support contract) against the industry’s leading storage vendors’ street price on similar mid-range all-flash arrays over 1TB: Dell (SC4020); EMC (VNX5200; VNX-F5000); HP (3PAR 7200 and 7200c); NetApp (FAS2520); IBM (V5000); Pure Storage (FA-450); and HDS (HUS110). The numbers are misleading, adds Vigil, however, which weights the advantage even more in Dell’s favor. The $1.66/Gb price is based on Dell’s raw numbers compared with...

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HP Targets Storage For The Software-Defined Data Center
Aug25

HP Targets Storage For The Software-Defined Data Center

Like it tried at EMC World in May, it looks like HP is looking to do another preemptive strike at this week’s VMworld 2014. The world’s largest IT vendor has decided to push the software-defined data center agenda of storage arch-rival EMC’s virtualization sidekick, as well as OpenStack cloud integration, and an entry-level all-flash array. The intent is to help relieve the pressure IT departments and service providers are under to deliver rapid business value with fewer resources, which it said is fueling the growth of cloud computing and a move to the SDDC. “Software defined data center needs new ways to handle data protection,” Craig Nunes, VP of Marketing, HP Storage, told IT Trends & Analysis. “We believe we’ve got some very unique offers for our customers.” HP’s announcements included: StoreVirtual Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) as a fully integrated storage option for HP Helion OpenStack and HP Helion OpenStack Community Edition; enhancements to StoreVirtual Storage hypervisor integration; new StoreOnce VSA license that cuts backup costs by 86% for small and remote sites; the 3PAR StoreServ 7200 All-Flash Starter Kit; and, HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage continues to collaborate with VMware on their planned Virtual Volumes (VVols) storage architecture. Despite the explosive ongoing growth in the amount of data to be stored, it’s been a tough period for the storage industry, with external disk storage systems factory revenues down 5.2% year over year to US$5.6 billion during the first quarter of 2014, and total (internal plus external) revenue ($7.3 billion) decreasing 6.9% YoY and 17% sequentially. In the total worldwide disk storage systems market, EMC finished in the top position (22.4%), followed by HP (15.1). “The poor results of the first quarter were driven by several factors, the most important of which was a -25% decline in high-end storage spending,” said Eric Sheppard, Research Director, IDC Storage. “Other important contributors to the market decline include the mainstream adoption of storage optimization technologies, a general trend towards keeping systems longer, economic uncertainty, and the ability of customers to address capacity needs on a micro and short-term basis through public cloud offerings.” EMC held on to its leadership position, but saw its external disk storage revenue dip slightly YoY from 30.2% to 29.1%. HP, IBM, and Hitachi finished in a statistical tie for the third position with shares of 8.8%, 8.8% and 8.7% respectively, behind second-place NetApp (15.1%). The storage picture was a lot murkier for HP following last week’s Q3 earnings data. “Storage revenue declined 4% year-over-year,” said President and CEO Meg Whitman during the analysts’ call. “However, converged storage was up 9% while traditional storage declined 14%. 3PAR returned to...

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Actifio & EMC: Clarification & How To Make A Few Billion $s

First, I can’t believe that after changing the name of ESG from Enterprise Storage Group to Enterprise Strategy Group almost 13 years ago, I still got called the former in this Forbes Article. The author quotes me somewhat incorrectly a few times, but the overall point was correct. I didn’t say EMC follows the “5 step program” outlined specifically, I said all incumbent players tend to do this. What I was referring to is the fact that when a new disruptive technology begins to encroach on an established market, the big incumbent almost always follows this path (which, FYI, is exactly what I would do in their shoes): To read the complete article, CLICK...

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