…Infrastructure Compatibility and VMware Cloud on AWS

Much of the discussion when it comes to moving workloads from on-premises data centers to cloud infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) is about the need to lift and shift VMs. The problem is that much of the discussion is about what happens after the lift and shift, in terms of the operational and cost-side of running VMs in IaaS. What has been missing is the discussion of how to get those VMs into the cloud in the first place. I can always easily tell who has actually attempted the shift and who hasn’t by asking them about the difficulties of converting on-premises VMs to cloud VMs. If the company gets into details about all the different conversion options (data migration, VM conversions, compatible hypervisors) and the issues around each, then I know they have actually made the conversion attempt. It’s no wonder that companies that are looking at leveraging cloud resources in a hybrid cloud configuration value infrastructure compatibility. I’ve been writing about these types of configurations for several years. In my 2017 Hybrid Cloud study, I asked companies the question “What is or likely will be the main objective of your organization’s hybrid cloud strategy?” The most commonly cited answer was common infrastructure compatibility, with 31% of respondents. In the same study, 91% of companies expect to have at least half their applications and workloads on-premises in five years. Only 7% said they expected most, if not all, of their workloads will run in the cloud in five years. With this need for on-premises infrastructure compatibility, it’s no wonder that the AWS VMware Cloud on AWS solution from VMware has been gaining momentum. It’s a pairing of the dominant on-premises hypervisor in VMware with the leading public cloud IaaS provider in Amazon Web Services. VMware Cloud on AWS is vSphere running directly on Amazon EC2 elastic, bare-metal infrastructure, along with vSAN for storage and NSX for networking. This solution is the purest form of infrastructure compatibility between on-premises and cloud, running the VMware solution within the AWS data centers, which results in a cloud IaaS environment that is compatible with the on-premises infrastructure at both the VM and management level. This is one of the easiest ways for on-premises VMware customers to get into the cloud, with little or no conversion, yet still have high bandwidth, low latency access to cloud services from AWS. VMware recently made several new announcements about VMware Cloud on AWS, including: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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…Compuware Introduces Topaz on AWS…

If you asked me three years ago what I thought of Compuware, I would have described it as “a point product company in managed decline.” At the time, Compuware was bifurcated between mainframe point solutions and application performance management software. Sales had softened; it was slow to release new products; and its portfolio was “stagnant.” In short, the company was struggling. But, in late 2014, everything changed for Compuware with a cash investment infusion; the hiring of a new, more focused management team; major changes in company culture (including a stronger emphasis on innovation); and the introduction of a new strategy with a strong focus on Development/Operations or DevOps, build/deploy; data management and cybersecurity. Accordingly, I wrote a report at the end of 2015 that described the new Compuware. Nearly two years later, I see Compuware as a company focused on making it easy for customers to consume its product offerings – while at the same time being optimized to create new products and services. Its two most recent announcements include expanded Topaz on AWS (Amazon Web Services) solutions support for CloudBees Jenkins Enterprise. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Does Avni SDC Score Twice With Citrix?
Sep25

Does Avni SDC Score Twice With Citrix?

Recent startup Avni, which is pushing its Software-Defined Cloud concept, has just announced a product integration with NetScaler, the popular Citrix application delivery controller. The deal looks even better for Avni with the news surfacing that Citrix is looking for a quick sale, whole or in part, and possibly to Dell. Analyst Zeus Kerravala, ZK Research, reported back in February that he had come across Avni, who was apparently “talking about cloud virtualization, which brings many benefits, such as seamless application roll-outs across any cloud and application portability across disparate clouds.” This was prior to a formal briefing, but he noted that if Avni can build a product that transforms a customer’s data centers to software defined cloud, “a company could deploy applications, compute and network services almost instantaneously, or “at cloud speed.” Avni unveiled SDC 2.0 back in April, quickly followed by the announcement it had validated its platform against key IT requirements as governed by the Open Networking User Group (May), and that it was joining HP Networking’s SDN Ecosystem (August). The integration of our SDC – “a full-featured platform that includes app services, software-defined network services, 3D analytics, policy automation, and cloud virtualization” – with Citrix’s NetScaler ADC allows us to overcome the bottlenecks that once drove down the performance and elasticity of individual apps in a large-scale cloud environment, said Avni founder and CEO Rohini Kasturi, in a prepared statement. In a conversation with IT Trends & Analysis, Kasturi said the Citrix and HP partnerships were just the first of many that will be announced this year. He said Avni came out of stealth 4-5 months ago and has done a number of deployments, and has a “huge pipeline” of companies, especially large financial companies, media companies. “By the end of the year you’ll see a lot more buzz from Avni.” The company is working on a lot of partnerships, he said, especially with cloud service providers. “The CSP is the big enabler.” Avni addresses two of the biggest pain points of moving to the cloud: getting applications up and running quickly, and the ability to move those applications easily from cloud to cloud. SDC gives companies the freedom to move to an alternative cloud infrastructure in record time and without impact on CapEx or OpEx, said Kasturi in an earlier statement. “What software-defined networking did for legacy networks, we’ve successfully done for the cloud.” Over half (53%) of organizations expect cloud to drive increased revenue over the next two years, according to a new Cisco survey. Moving to the cloud can deliver an average of $1.6 million in additional revenue per application deployed on private...

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EMC Dips Deeper Into The Shallow End of The Data Lake
Mar23

EMC Dips Deeper Into The Shallow End of The Data Lake

Barely a month after making its first big splash in the Data Lake, EMC is back at it with an all-in-one Big Data analytics solution — hardware, software and services – with availability and pricing to be determined later. The Federation Business Data Lake packages storage and Big Data analytics technologies from EMC Information Infrastructure, Pivotal, and VMware, together with services, to accelerate and automate deployment of Data Lakes and clear ‘the path for new insights and disruptive differentiation.’ It greatly simplifies the massively complex task of building a Data Lake and is designed for speed, self-service and scalability for the enterprise, enabling organizations to begin making better-informed business decisions using Big Data analytics, said Aidan O’Brien, Senior Director, EMC. “This is the industry’s first enterprise-grade Data Lake,” he said. It seems like everybody’s use case varies slightly, stated O’Brien. So what we’ve tried to do is to increase standardization and flexibility. No company has all the technologies required, i.e. EMC lacks a visualization component, he said, but what they’ve done is provide some ready-made apps, a data scientist in a box, that can be implemented in as little as seven days. For the more adventurous, there’s also a software developer kit. According to Gartner, a Data Lake is a collection of storage instances of various data assets additional to the originating data sources. These assets are stored in a near-exact, or even exact, copy of the source format. The purpose of a Data Lake is to present an unrefined view of data to only the most highly skilled analysts, to help them explore their data refinement and analysis techniques independent of any of the system-of-record compromises that may exist in a traditional analytic data store (such as a data mart or data warehouse). EMC gets more granular, defining the Data Lake as a modern approach to data analytics by taking advantage of the processing and cost advantages of Hadoop. It allows you to store all of the data that you think might be important into a central repository as is, and by leaving the data in its raw form, you don’t need a pre-determined schema or ‘schema on load’. Schema on load is a data warehousing process that optimizes a query, but also strips the data of information that could be useful for analysis. This flexibility then allows the data lake to feed all downstream applications such as a data warehouse, analytic sandboxes, and other analytic environments. It’s still early days for the Data Lake concept, but Suresh Sathyamurthy, Sr. Director, Product Marketing for EMC’s Emerging Technologies Division, said his company was the market share leader, even though...

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Data Service Providers Find a Home in AWS

Amazon Web Services didn’t make any Big Data-related announcements at its annual customer conference last week, choosing instead to focus on a slew of developer-targeted services and a new relational database offering. But the topic of Big Data was none-the-less top of mind for many AWS enterprise customers. This goes for direct enterprise customers — Philips Healthcare took the re:Invent keynote stage to discuss how it is using data analytics in the cloud to better diagnose and coordinate treatment in cancer patients – as well as enterprise Big Data and analytics vendors. Splunk and SAP, for example, both said they are seeing customers move their deployments from on-premises to the AWS cloud with increasing frequency. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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