Apple vs. DOJ Doesn’t Really Matter

Anyone remember the Crypto wars of the 1990s? Back in the early 1990s, the U.S. placed strict regulations on the exportation of cryptography and even put encryption technologies on the munitions list as auxiliary military equipment. This restriction was a real burden to software firms like Lotus, Microsoft, and Novell as they wanted to offer data confidentiality and integrity features for PC users. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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IBM, Apple, and Watson: You are about to become obsolete

I used to work for IBM and it is always a bit of a kick when I’m at an IBM event. IBM was not only the greatest company I ever worked for, it was the most frustrating. It was a firm defined by obsolete processes at the time, and decisions that were based on a worldview that seemed decades out of date. This is what makes analytics in particular so interesting for IBM. If anything could address fixing a problem like this, it would be analytics—and IBM is all in. One of my biggest takeaways from this event is how much the entire focus of this event has changed from last year and I think it is largely because IBM isn’t just “selling” analytics. It is using analytics and instead of making decision based on old—and often false—data it is increasingly making decisions on current accurate data. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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iPad Pro – Why Apple’s Business Market Gambit Will Fail

Businesses are among the IT market’s most cautious customers. Even a vendor as gifted and adroit as Apple will have trouble convincing them to invest in an untested platform. That’s one reason the company has inked high profile partnerships with IBM and Cisco, both of which have the enterprise cred Apple sorely lacks. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell, NVIDIA, and VMware: Cornering the Market On PCs

Over the last decade we’ve seen one company repeatedly corner a market on personal technology. That company was Apple and it did it using one simple, repeatable formula. It came up with a new and unique angle for an existing but underperforming area of consumer technology, then drove demand to its better model forcing other, often larger, competitors to chase Apple. Well, apparently Dell, VMware, and NVIDIA collectively figured that Personal Computers were underperforming and came up with a new spin on traditional thin clients in order to try to do the same thing with the PC market. I think they’ve got a shot. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How HP’s Turnaround Got Derailed

HP has begun to spiral and with the reversal of Whitman’s stated strategy to hold HP together and flip from using a build strategy consistent with her early background at eBay. Her new strategy is now more consistent with one more closely connected to Bane & Company, where she worked before eBay, and focuses on keeping the financial analysts happy by making tactical moves to prop up the stock price for the firm by trading off its long term future and survival. She is now less and less seen as a savior and more often connected to her failed predecessors. This is not an uncommon problem and it showcases why Dell went private and why firms need to be led by subject matter experts and not treat CEOs as some kind of generic skill set. We have recently seen this in spades at companies like Microsoft and Yahoo who both suffered under the leadership of qualified CEOs who really didn’t understand the respective firm’s business intimately, even though one of them actually helped found his company. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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