Dell Refreshes Mobile Security Lineup
Apr22

Dell Refreshes Mobile Security Lineup

The RSA Conference 2015 wraps up on Friday, but before all those security gurus, vendors, analysts, cybercriminals and cybercops escape, Dell has announced the latest additions to its Secure Mobile Access lineup, formerly known as SonicWALL SMA. The SMA OS 11.2, which adds secure access to more resources using a standard HTML 5 browser, enabling ‘intuitive access’ for most smartphones, tablets and laptop users and reduces reliance on Java and ActiveX components, is now generally available, and the SMA 6200 (supporting up to 2,000 concurrent users) and 7200 (up to 10,000 concurrent users) appliances will be available next month. Dell says ‘security is a non-negotiable’, but according to RSA (EMC’s security arm) president Amit Yoran, we’re still in the “Dark Ages of Information Security.” Last year was yet another reminder that “we are losing”, he said in this week’s keynote. “The adversaries are out-maneuvering the industry, out-gunning the industry, and winning by every measure.” Jumping the gun on RSA and the plethora of ‘doom-and-gloom’ cybersecurity reports, surveys and whitepapers that preceded and accompanied it, Dell released its own annual threats report to shed light on emerging security risks. Among the highlights: -a rise in point-of-sale (POS) malware variants and attacks against payment card infrastructures targeting retail organizations; -more companies were exposed to attackers hiding in plain sight as a result of SSL/TLS encrypted traffic; and, -a 100% increase in attacks against industrial control (SCADA) systems. Dell’s numbers are just the tip of the cybercrime iceberg: -security compromises increased 64% in 2014; -54% of breaches remain undiscovered for months; -60% of data is stolen in hours; and, -100% of companies connect to domains that host malicious files or services. Dell isn’t saying it’s fixed cybersecurity, but it is doing what it can to make security easier, more affordable and more scalable, said Matt Dieckman, Product Line Manager, Secure Remote Access Solutions, Dell. He told IT Trends & Analysis that they’ve been seeing the number of devices increase, so the new appliances offer increased capacity, with 6200 jumping from support for 250 users to 2,000 users, and the 7200 has doubled, from 5,000 to now supporting 10,000 concurrent users. Dieckman said customers don’t want to rely on Java and ActiveX legacy technologies. The new OS, SMA 11.2, adds secure access to more resources using a standard HTML 5 browser, including access to Citrix Xendesktop and Xenapps ICA support. At RSA Dell also showcased what it called the industry’s first demonstration of a highly-resilient, scalable, “Open Firewall Sandwich” layer 3 architecture (in collaboration with Array Networks and Spirent Communication), a solution which overcomes the challenges posed by the dramatic increase in secure web-based...

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How to Protect an EVO RAIL (Video Series)

VMware’s EVO RAIL is an architecture for a hyper-converged, software-defined data center in a single appliance form-factor … to be delivered by various hardware partners.  But how do you protect that all-in-one solution? For the next several weeks, ESG will be releasing a seven-part series of ESG Capsules, 2 minute video segments, where I’ll talk more about some of the protection possibilities and caveats in an EVO world. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Is SDDC a Product or a Mindset?

My response to Stephen Foskett’s tweet of a post about the Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC) Symposium led to an interesting conversation about the nature of the SDDC—what it is, what it is not, and why we should care. The software-defined data center is considered by some to be an instrument of vendor lock-in, vaporware, or in many ways just marketing hype. “SDDC” has many different definitions, but I do not believe it reflects any of those commonly used. Instead, I hold that it is a way of thinking, a way of looking at the new world of IT in which we live. This has sparked quite an interesting Twitter conversation between many interested parties.  I have included the beginnings of the Twitter discussion in the image to the right. It started with the view that the SDDC is a concept—an architecture—and not a product. Then, it blossomed from there. Why do I consider it a concept? Or an architecture? SDDC is software that is used to define a data center, which implies that there are no longer walls around the data center except for those constructed by software. In general, VMware wants us to consider the SDDC to fall within its definition of the hybrid cloud: a local data center and a remote Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud. I see this as too limited a view of the concept of the SDDC. So, we should go back to the beginning: To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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