Pure Storage: Empowering Artificial Intelligence

Today, Pure Storage announced the release of AI-Ready Infrastructure (AIRI), a major move in serving the artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning space. The newly announced solution combines Pure Storage FlashBlade and NVIDIA DGX-1 technology. According to Pure Storage, it is the industry’s first integrated AI-ready infrastructure for deploying deep learning at scale. With AI and machine learning still relatively nascent technologies, the first question that comes to mind might be, “Why an integrated solution, and not just a reference architecture?” I can give you three answers: To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning…

The traction over the last few years in the artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) space is remarkable, and I’m not just talking about consumer-based products like self-driving cars, or virtual assistants like Google Assistant, Alexa, or Siri. While those products get the headlines, AI/ML is rapidly spreading across the enterprise IT space. I feel like I can’t go a day without a company mentioning AI or ML as part of their product or forward-looking strategy. It’s not just for crazy, sci-fi predictive analytics projects in a bunker somewhere. While that definitely still happens, AI and ML (and deep learning too) are being used across all aspects of IT: big data, cloud, IoT, security, infrastructure, systems management, etc.While AI/ML is a top priority for businesses that expect it to have a significant (positive) business impact as they continue to digitally transform, investments remain modest because of its sheer impact on all aspects of the infrastructure. Challenges associated with infrastructure cost, lack of in-house expertise, and insufficient data quality are just the start. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

Dell Technologies Surveys the Digital 2030 Future

As it has for past future-focused studies, Dell teamed up with the well-respected Institute for the Future (IFTF) to forecast how emerging technologies — notably artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT) — may change the way we live and work by 2030. To extend that work, Dell Technologies commissioned Vanson Bourne, an independent UK research firm, to conduct a survey-based research study to gauge business leader predictions and preparedness for the future. The Realizing 2030 survey was quite large and wide in scope and reach, extending to 17 countries in the Americas, Asia Pacific and Japan, and Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Secondly, more than 10 industries including financial services, private healthcare and manufacturing were covered. Finally, the survey had 3800 complete responses from director and c-suite executives in midsized and enterprise organizations involved in key functions, including finance, sales and R&D in addition to IT. That is an impressive number of respondents and thus should be considered statistically reliable across a number of dimensions. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More
Has Cisco Got The Right Stuff?
Feb01

Has Cisco Got The Right Stuff?

John Chambers, who handed control of Cisco to Chuck Robbins in July 2015, was bumped further upstairs a month ago when he became Chairman Emeritus, while his successor took over his role as Chairman of the Board, but more than a change in leadership, the turnover represents a new — and hopefully — improved networking, server and security vendor. The company, which has been struggling with the cloud and commodity hardware and software-based competitors for the last decade, looks poised for new life — and growth — as it hosts this week’s Cisco Live EMEA 2018, in Barcelona, Spain. Reinventing Cisco is not new. “We’re probably reinvented ourselves five or six times literally in the last two decades alone,” said Chambers shortly after moving up to the board. In an industry famous for it’s what-have-you-done-for-me-next philosophy, networking has been battered by explosive demands, increasing complexity and flat budgets, with the results that Cisco’s market domination has been mired in commodity hell. In Q3 its Ethernet switching business grew 7.4% year-over-year to $6.75 billion (56.7% market share), while the router market climbed 3% to 41.4%, up slightly sequentially (40.8%), but down year-over-year (44%). While networking accounts for the bulk of Cisco’s revenues, it’s been doing pretty well in the datacenter market with its server portfolio (i.e. UCS and HyperFlex), statistically tied with IBM for third place in 3Q17, with 5.8% of the market ($992 million), behind HPE (19.5%) and Dell (18.1%). Cisco also did very well in the converged systems market, and while it’s a much smaller segment, $2.99 billon vs $17 billon in Q3, the company held down second place between Dell (48.3%) and HPE (10.3% share, down 41.9% from a year-ago’s 18.1%), and grew its marketshare 56.4% YoY to $485.5 million. Security is another market where Cisco is growing strongly. Cybersecurity spending is expected to soar from last year’s $137.85 billion to $231.94 billion by 2022, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 11.0%. According to ESG cybersecurity guru Jon Oltsik, “Cisco is one of only a handful of $2 billion-plus cybersecurity vendors that can grow its security revenue to over $5 billion by 2020.” At 4% of total revenues, the company’s security business is never going to be more than a wagging tail, but it grew 13% YoY in 2016, and 12% in the first nine months of 2017, which is way better than the switch and router business. A week ago Cisco expanded its cybersecurity portfolio with the acquisition of Skyport — a privately held company that has secured approximately $70 million in funding — whose core product platform is SkySecure Server, a physical server...

Read More
Cisco: “The new datacenter is the multi-cloud datacenter.”
Oct12

Cisco: “The new datacenter is the multi-cloud datacenter.”

Already one of the biggest players in the red-hot cloud infrastructure market (it grew 25.8% in the second quarter to $12.3 billion), Cisco Systems — in third place with 8.2% marketshare, trailing Dell (11.8%) and HPE (11.1%) — has a lot of credibility when it says cloud is transforming the datacenter. “The new datacenter is the multi-cloud datacenter,” said Tom Edsall, formerly a Cisco Fellow, SVP and GM, Insieme Business Unit, Cisco Systems. However, he told IT Trends & Analysis, the challenge is now you have an infrastructure that is basically a multi-vendor infrastructure. Rather than just a collection of hardware and software from different vendors, you have to throw in the various cloud providers like Amazon and Azure. He said organizations have part of their infrastructure running on different clouds, with different APIs, and are struggling to make the differences disappear. “The problems that we encountered 10 years ago are happening all over again,” said Edsall. “Then it wasn’t cloud, it was multi-vendor.” He added that the company has had strong success with on premise with its ACI (Application Centric Infrastructure) portfolio with over 4,000 customers. But while the customers really like the application-centric approach, they are frustrated because “they can’t get the same API at Amazon.” They want to know how do they get a common experience across these systems, said Edsall. Ever helpful, Cisco recently announced a management and automation platform for its Unified Computing System (UCS) and HyperFlex Systems, Cisco Intersight. To be available 4Q17 in two versions — the Cisco Intersight Base Edition will be available at no charge, while the Cisco Intersight Essentials Edition will cost you — it is intended to simplify datacenter operations by delivering systems management as-a-service, instead of having to maintain ‘islands of on-premise management infrastructure.’ ‘The longer-term vision of Intersight is spot-on,” noted Matt Kimball, senior datacenter analyst, Moor Insights & Strategy. ‘Not only does it address the issues IT organizations face today, but it also provides a platform that can accommodate the unknowns of tomorrow. If Cisco successfully executes this vision, it will firmly position itself as a leader in multi-cloud infrastructure orchestration and management.’ Unsurprisingly, a canned quote included in the Cisco release was equally ebullient: “Organizations that move to cloud-based systems management platforms will find that service delivery quality is significantly improved, the overall risk to the business goes down, and IT staff productivity is increased,” said Matt Eastwood, Senior Vice President, IDC. “Artificial Intelligence (AI) –infused cloud-based management tools can offer deep insights into the state of the infrastructure, identify troubles before they become major issues, and enable quicker ‘root cause’ identification and analysis...

Read More