CA Wants To Be The One (DevSecOps) Throat To Choke
Nov30

CA Wants To Be The One (DevSecOps) Throat To Choke

Whether it’s via a perfect storm, product onslaught or the ‘disrupt or be disrupted’ times, CA Technologies appears to be making steady, if slow, progress from its mainframe roots to the app-fueled digital transformation world where trust, AKA cybersecurity, is essential. Changing a $4-billion company is proving challenging, especially when you consider that the bulk of your business is tied up with a mainframe environment synonymous with slow and steady, as befits the platform that holds between 70-80% of corporate data and affects 70% of enterprise transactions. The software developer may be pushing the ‘software factory’ theme together with fast and agile DevOps, or the newer handle, DevSecOps, but that doesn’t mean it’s customers are comfortable with rapid changes. Not that they have much choice: only 12% of the Fortune 500 survived the period between 1955 and 2016, and up to 50% of the S&P 500 ranks are expected to be replaced over the next 10 years. So disruption is the name of the game, and CA is doing its best to change its spots and become the essential go-to partner for fast and agile DevSecOps where ‘everyone is responsible for security with the goal of safely distributing security decisions at speed and scale to those who hold the highest level of context without sacrificing the safety required.’ That’s a mouthful, but the stakes are mind-boggling, with the potential to take CA’s total addressable market from mainframe billions to DT/DevSecOps trillions. “The ability to manage change, respond to new inputs or insights and pivot has never been more important,” said CA Technologies CEO Mike Gregoire in his opening keynote . “Our entire portfolio is designed around the pillars of the Modern Software Factory to increase the velocity, security and performance of the solutions and the apps that are critical to our customers’ businesses.” He said the company is on a “deliberate journey”, balancing creation and execution and morphing from a solutions company to one that is focused on “accelerating business values.” Operational efficiency isn’t enough, Gregoire added. “First among the tools to confront these challenges is your Modern Software Factory. It ensures that your company is built to change and can adapt to an accelerating digital world.” We may be app-driven, but without security, you’re looking at a world of pain. With DevOps, CA helped break down the barriers between development and operations but “we don’t think about security,” said Gregoire in a media scrum following his keynote. The application is the weakest link in your chain, he said, so you need security involved right from the start, with the coder. However, rather than best-of-breed standalone tools, customers are...

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CA: Connecting the DoTs

To help address the emerging multi-trillion-dollar app-driven digital transformation business phenomenon, CA Technologies made more than 20 new and enhanced product announcements at CA World ‘17. That might seem like a lot, but not when you consider that even after decades of consolidating and rationalizing its software portfolio, the ISV still lists 192 separate products on its website (courtesy of the approximately 70 companies acquired since opening its doors as Computer Associates back in 1976). While its efforts to expand the non-mainframe portion of its business — 65% of total revenues last quarter — seem to be taking longer than expected, CA’s emphasis on four pillars, or what Ayman Sayed, President & Chief Product Officer, called patterns — 1-making the products simpler to use and driving faster time to value; 2-SaaS availability; 3-openness, i.e. any infrastructure, any platform; and 4-AI — figured prominently in the innovation onslaught. Innovation was repeated often in the keynotes and one-on-ones. ”Most everyone in our industry is operationally efficient… but that’s not enough,” said CA CEO Mike Gregoire. “Our job is to break down barriers between technology and innovation,” referring to the event’s ‘No Barriers’ theme. Whether it’s built internally or bought, the company’s promise “and the holy grail” is to take innovation, integrate it with its other offerings and make it a “force multiplier”, he said. The innovations were intended to help address some of the impacts customers are confronting, he said. There has been a shift from building products to providing and supporting business outcomes. Customers are also demanding more intelligence, and security is becoming a bigger concern and a challenge, he added. Customers were another focus for CA, and as important as the announcements were, the “most exciting” news were the “170 customers joining us to talk about using our products to transform themselves,” said Sayed. Then he talked about the products, including the company’s latest artificial intelligence initiatives. CA combined the up and coming technology with its mainframe roots with solutions that ‘help customers speed time to resolution by 5X, reduce insider threats and cut operational expenses by 25%.’ “Through A.I. and machine-learning powered intelligent automation, CA’s new mainframe solutions enable increased insights across broader sets of data,” said CA’s Ashok Reddy, GM, Mainframe, in a prepared statement. It’s not a new concept or term, but as part of its security focus CA is pushing the concept of DevSecOps. In announcing new tools that integrate security throughout the software development lifecycle, Sayed said this approach is “critically important”, and the tools are now available across the company’s Automic, Veracode, and Continuous Delivery portfolios. “Companies that embrace DevSecOps deliver better and...

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Teradata’s Analyze This: Any Tool, Anywhere, Anybody

At last week’s ‘The Edge of Next’, Teradata Corporation’s (TDC) annual customer and partner event, the data analytics company made several product, service and business announcements, as well as provided more context on its new AI survey that concluded artificial intelligence is on big business’ agenda, but that significant challenges will have to be overcome before it goes mainstream. While TDC didn’t make a lot of announcements, the ones it did make were fairly significant, including: the Teradata Analytics Platform; Teradata IntelliSphere, with all the tools to ingest, access, deploy and manage a flexible analytical ecosystem; AI services and accelerators; and the Agile Analytics Factory an as-a-service program to accelerate client innovation in advanced analytics, and deliver strategic business outcomes. When asked for the key takeaway from the announcements, Teradata’s Imad Birouty, Director, Technical Product Marketing, said the new products and ecosystem provide analytics flexibility for customers, what the company calls derisking. “There’s no risk to your decision,” he said. “The ability to have technology run on-prem, in the cloud… it takes the shackles off of them.” As companies’ needs change, or they become more familiar with the technologies, tools and deployment options, they change where and how they do analytics, he told IT Trends & Analysis. They may want to start on-prem, but six months later might decide cloud looks more appealing, or vice versa. IntelliSphere is a toolbox that provides all the tools you need to build an analytics system, said Birouty, and you can make all the changes you want without having to rip and replace. “This is a comprehensive portfolio, 10 products in one bundle. As your business needs change tomorrow… you already have all the tools in your toolbox, so change all you want. It gives companies the flexibility for today and tomorrow.” “We’re helping companies to operationalize their analytics, and make it part of your daily workflow.” That’s difficult to do today, added Birouty, and a lot of companies stumble trying to make analytics initiatives successful. Flexibility is essential, said Oliver Ratzesberger, EVP, and Chief Product Officer, Teradata. Customers cannot predict what is coming tomorrow, so the company’s strategy, Teradata Everywhere (originally unveiled in September 2016) provides the necessary flexibility and agility, delivered via four broad concepts: 1/analyze anything; 2/deploy anywhere; 3/buy anyway; and 4/move anytime.Customers can move anytime, anywhere and are not locked in, he said. The products and services are important, but how they are deployed are even more significant, said Ratzesberger. “…when companies step up to take an enterprise view… not department… they drive significant improvement… when all of that comes together that’s when we see order of magnitude increases...

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Short-Term License Pain For Long-Term Subscription Gain?
Oct26

Short-Term License Pain For Long-Term Subscription Gain?

ANAHEIM: As the market waits with more than a little anticipation for next week’s Q3 2017 quarterly report, Teradata Corporation (TDC) is wrapping up its annual customer and partner event — approximately 4,500 attendees — which was held under the rather appropriate tag line, ‘The Edge of NEXT’. As the company suggest, ‘Next’ is the rapidly approaching analytics revolution, a market segment that has been around forever, but is undergoing rapid change and increasing adoption as the sheer volume and value of data escalates, and organizations start to achieve game-changing results folding, spindling and mutilating — i.e. analyzing — that cornucopia of data. Originating out of research at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1976, TDC began life officially in the proverbial California (Brentwood) garage in 1979, and shipped its first beta database management system (DBMS) in 1983. Fast forward to July 2017, and TDC, which now positions itself as the ‘leading data and analytics company,’ reported ‘dismal results’ for its second quarter, where ‘its top and bottom lines not only fell short of the respective Zacks Consensus Estimate but also marked significant year over year decline.’ The company is in the process of changing its business model, and as usual for a publicly traded company, investor — or at least analyst — patience is nonexistent. Last quarter’s revenue was $513 million, just a shade under the expected $513.35 million, but earnings ‘plunged’ 80% year-over-year, or 69% YoY on a non-GAAP basis. Expectations for the year are revenues of $2.095 billion to $2.140 billion, representing a decline of 10% to 8%, which makes next week’s Q3 results so interesting, to see just how the transition is faring as the revenue-model changes (hopefully) gather momentum. During the Q2 earnings call President & CEO Vic Lund told analysts TDC’s strategy, “which is business outcome-led and technology enabled,” is “extremely relevant today.” The new strategy, focused on customer success, is being supported “by our increased funnel and our momentum, which positions us well for the last half of 2017 and a strong start to 2018.” Teradata must not only overcome its business challenges, but also the changes sweeping its BDA market. Revenue projections are a moving target, but IDC puts the global big data and analytics (BDA) software market at $49.1 billion in 2016, and predicts it will expand at a compound annual growth rate of 10.6% through 2021. Rival research firm Gartner calls 2017 ‘the year that data and analytics go mainstream’, and that ‘[T]hose who fail to act today will suffer not just in 2017, but also hugely limit their potential for growth in 2018 and beyond, as the...

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IBM OpenPOWER Moves on Deep Learning with a Vengeance

IBM’s OpenPOWER organization has clearly stepped up its game this week with a massive move towards making deep learning and AI efforts far more affordable. The latest announcement was to expand both its Open Source efforts to include TensorFlow—a Google-developed numerical platform designed for AI and deep learning—and significant enhancements to its NVIDIA-enhanced POWER8 platform—the S822LC (as these things get smarter I’m starting to wonder when we’ll stop using letters and numbers for names and just call them “Bruce”). You can read the announcement here yourself. Let’s chat a bit about what it means. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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