…Infrastructure Compatibility and VMware Cloud on AWS

Much of the discussion when it comes to moving workloads from on-premises data centers to cloud infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) is about the need to lift and shift VMs. The problem is that much of the discussion is about what happens after the lift and shift, in terms of the operational and cost-side of running VMs in IaaS. What has been missing is the discussion of how to get those VMs into the cloud in the first place. I can always easily tell who has actually attempted the shift and who hasn’t by asking them about the difficulties of converting on-premises VMs to cloud VMs. If the company gets into details about all the different conversion options (data migration, VM conversions, compatible hypervisors) and the issues around each, then I know they have actually made the conversion attempt. It’s no wonder that companies that are looking at leveraging cloud resources in a hybrid cloud configuration value infrastructure compatibility. I’ve been writing about these types of configurations for several years. In my 2017 Hybrid Cloud study, I asked companies the question “What is or likely will be the main objective of your organization’s hybrid cloud strategy?” The most commonly cited answer was common infrastructure compatibility, with 31% of respondents. In the same study, 91% of companies expect to have at least half their applications and workloads on-premises in five years. Only 7% said they expected most, if not all, of their workloads will run in the cloud in five years. With this need for on-premises infrastructure compatibility, it’s no wonder that the AWS VMware Cloud on AWS solution from VMware has been gaining momentum. It’s a pairing of the dominant on-premises hypervisor in VMware with the leading public cloud IaaS provider in Amazon Web Services. VMware Cloud on AWS is vSphere running directly on Amazon EC2 elastic, bare-metal infrastructure, along with vSAN for storage and NSX for networking. This solution is the purest form of infrastructure compatibility between on-premises and cloud, running the VMware solution within the AWS data centers, which results in a cloud IaaS environment that is compatible with the on-premises infrastructure at both the VM and management level. This is one of the easiest ways for on-premises VMware customers to get into the cloud, with little or no conversion, yet still have high bandwidth, low latency access to cloud services from AWS. VMware recently made several new announcements about VMware Cloud on AWS, including: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Case Against AWS – And It’s Not AWS’ Fault

Recently the NSA, a highly secure US government entity, left an unprotected disk image loaded with classified information right out in public on AWS. The NSA left it there on an “unlisted” server, but it didn’t have a password. Thus, if you stumbled across it, or someone went looking for it (a cybersecurity person at UpGuard did just that), it was yours for the taking. I will bypass all the ironic commentary/jokes that could/should be made and get to the point: It isn’t Amazon’s fault. If you are dumb enough to put this out there unprotected, you get what you deserve. Don’t blame the highway commission because you drove into a tree at 200MPH. What it does highlight, beyond human stupidity, is the ease of doing damage because no one is there to protect you from yourself. If this were any reasonable enterprise storing these records themselves, SOMEONE would be watching or protecting things like this from occurring. A security officer would have created policy that was pushed down to IT admins who would set up specific volumes that could be used for sensitive data with permissions to access that data enforced all over the place. Someone would be an adult. It’s not AWS’ job to be your babysitter. It’s their job to give you what you pay for—in this case, a virtual machine with a virtual disk. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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AWS Is Not Slowing Down at re:Invent

AWS, as an established public cloud leader, can afford to rest on its laurels, but with competitors sprinting behind it, it is not slowing down in any way. During the Global Partner Summit at the re:Invent trade show, there were numerous announcements, including the Networking Competency for AWS Partners and the availability of PrivateLink for customer and partner network services. Are there any patterns I see? The most obvious item is that AWS is relentless in releasing new capabilities. The term “re:Invent” references themselves as well as the directive posed to their customers. A more pragmatic view is that AWS continues to fill in some holes in its offerings as the ecosystem evolves. AWS has a history of releasing many services per year, and it is not slowing down. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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IBM Cloud Private – What it Means and Why it Matters…

A significant disconnect exists in the public perception of cloud computing customers and end users—namely in how enterprises are served by the likes of public cloud players, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud and IBM Cloud. Why is that notable? For two reasons. Since large organizations are far better funded than small and mid-sized businesses (SMBs), they are obviously attractive targets for cloud providers. But at the same time, enterprises have discretely different and far more robust computing needs. So, while companies of every size can adopt conventional cloud offerings, those services aren’t appropriate for every application or scenario. That’s especially true for large private and public-sector organizations that face demanding compute and regulatory requirements, like healthcare and finance companies. They typically support their most business-critical applications and data with robust, secure, on-premises systems. But that places them in a quandary if they wish to maintain the best aspects of their traditional infrastructures while gaining public cloud’s easy-to-use benefits, plus cloud-native integration and portability features, and access to new development tools and paradigms. An approach many are taking is to deploy “private clouds” that blend the best of both worlds. In fact, IBM estimates that starting in 2017 companies will spend more than $50B annually to create and evolve private clouds, with growth rates of 15%-20% through 2020. Speeding and simplifying that process is central to IBM’s new Cloud Private platform. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…Compuware Introduces Topaz on AWS…

If you asked me three years ago what I thought of Compuware, I would have described it as “a point product company in managed decline.” At the time, Compuware was bifurcated between mainframe point solutions and application performance management software. Sales had softened; it was slow to release new products; and its portfolio was “stagnant.” In short, the company was struggling. But, in late 2014, everything changed for Compuware with a cash investment infusion; the hiring of a new, more focused management team; major changes in company culture (including a stronger emphasis on innovation); and the introduction of a new strategy with a strong focus on Development/Operations or DevOps, build/deploy; data management and cybersecurity. Accordingly, I wrote a report at the end of 2015 that described the new Compuware. Nearly two years later, I see Compuware as a company focused on making it easy for customers to consume its product offerings – while at the same time being optimized to create new products and services. Its two most recent announcements include expanded Topaz on AWS (Amazon Web Services) solutions support for CloudBees Jenkins Enterprise. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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