…Infrastructure Compatibility and VMware Cloud on AWS

Much of the discussion when it comes to moving workloads from on-premises data centers to cloud infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) is about the need to lift and shift VMs. The problem is that much of the discussion is about what happens after the lift and shift, in terms of the operational and cost-side of running VMs in IaaS. What has been missing is the discussion of how to get those VMs into the cloud in the first place. I can...

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The Case Against AWS – And It’s Not AWS’ Fault

Recently the NSA, a highly secure US government entity, left an unprotected disk image loaded with classified information right out in public on AWS. The NSA left it there on an “unlisted” server, but it didn’t have a password. Thus, if you stumbled across it, or someone went looking for it (a cybersecurity person at UpGuard did just that), it was yours for the taking. I will bypass all the ironic commentary/jokes that could/should be...

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AWS Is Not Slowing Down at re:Invent

AWS, as an established public cloud leader, can afford to rest on its laurels, but with competitors sprinting behind it, it is not slowing down in any way. During the Global Partner Summit at the re:Invent trade show, there were numerous announcements, including the Networking Competency for AWS Partners and the availability of PrivateLink for customer and partner network services. Are there any patterns I see? The most obvious item...

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IBM Cloud Private – What it Means and Why it Matters…

A significant disconnect exists in the public perception of cloud computing customers and end users—namely in how enterprises are served by the likes of public cloud players, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud and IBM Cloud. Why is that notable? For two reasons. Since large organizations are far better funded than small and mid-sized businesses (SMBs), they are obviously attractive targets for cloud providers. But at the...

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…Compuware Introduces Topaz on AWS…

If you asked me three years ago what I thought of Compuware, I would have described it as “a point product company in managed decline.” At the time, Compuware was bifurcated between mainframe point solutions and application performance management software. Sales had softened; it was slow to release new products; and its portfolio was “stagnant.” In short, the company was struggling. But, in late 2014, everything changed for Compuware...

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