IBM DataWorks… the Next Big Data Thing

How vendors support open source technologies doesn’t follow a set path. Many start-ups and smaller companies (along with once-small, now-prosperous businesses) make near or complete commitments to open source for both philosophical and financial reasons. Many leverage Linux and other specific platforms at their developers’ or customers’ behest while others attempt to bend the technology to their own will or competitive advantage by creating proprietary forks. That’s a critical issue because of the natural ways in which open source development evolves along with and very often leads innovative industry trends. For example, the big data technologies and initiatives roiling IT over the past half-decade have been driven by open source Apache Software Foundation projects, including Hadoop, MapReduce and Spark. In fact, vendors that ignore or fail to support these products find themselves falling quickly behind the curve technologically and competitively. IBM has pursued a singular path in its own open source efforts. In the late 1990s, the company committed $1B to develop Linux solutions for its z Systems mainframes and other server platforms. That was followed by substantial investments in a range of platform and community-building projects, along with open sourcing technologies the company developed in-house with Eclipse and the POWER chip architecture among the most notable of these. The company also proactively invested in Apache Spark and other complementary advanced analytics and big data projects. What does any of this have to do with anything? IBM’s newly announced Project DataWorks qualifies as both the culmination of and a natural next step for the company’s open source big data strategies and goals. As such, it’s worth close consideration. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Teradata Positioned To Weather IT’s ‘Perfect Storm’?

ATLANTA: For perhaps the first time in IT’s history, outcomes, not technology, are driving the industry, and data analytics specialist Teradata Corporation (TDC) is looking to take advantage of this ‘perfect storm’. The confluence of the latest IT tools and applications — social, cloud, mobility, big data, analytics, Internet of Things (IoT) and security — together with the substantial benefits of a data-driven approach, a business phenomenon with a body count, represents a huge opportunity for the company, which is trying to change its focus from technology to outcomes. “We have gone through the process of how we are actually changing: we are going to be business focused, not technology focused,” said President & CEO Vic Lund at last week’s Partners conference. Still, technology was a large part of the annual event’s agenda, where Teradata made a number of product and service announcements, including Borderless Analytics, RACE (Rapid Analytic Consulting Engagement), Customer Journey Analytic Solution, and Teradata Everywhere. They were significant announcements that represent a major shift for Teradata, said Oliver Ratzesberger, EVP and Chief Product Officer. “We’re focusing on business solutions more than we ever have before.” Digitalization of the enterprise is a big topic for most companies around the world, said Oliver Ratzesberger, EVP and CPO, Teradata. Companies are looking for “high-impact outcomes that benefit the bottom line”, an optimized analytical ecosystem with “flexibility and agility” to most effectively run  your organization. “Business-led outcomes is really what companies are focused on.” That has significant implications for Teradata, he said. “We’re focusing on business solutions more than we ever have before.” One of the biggest — if not the biggest — implications of the onrushing changes is the speed of these changes. I talk to customers every day and they’re terrified of their inability to change fast enough, said Teradata’s John Thuma, Data Scientist & Director of Analytics. In addition to the rate of change, is the need for a new set of KPIs (key performance indicators), he added. “It’s not the technology, it’s the people and processes that matter.” Not only can companies not rest on “past glories”, even if they can change, are the changes they’re making successful, he asked? “That’s also a big factor.” The paradigm that people were expendable is changing. Now organizations must not only look at how — and with who — they can continue to disrupt their competition, but also how to disrupt themselves. Ratzesberger agrees that the companies who are doing well with the digital transformation “have realized that the biggest problem is people, process in organizations.” It’s all about how you use it and reshape the company, empowering the...

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New Offerings Represent A Major Shift For Teradata

ATLANTA: Data analytics specialist Teradata Corporation (TDC), which has gathered 3,000 customers and partners for its annual Partner conference, made a number of product and service announcements this week which should generate a lot of customer interest, especially if they’re using — or want to make greater use — of cloud. According to the company the new offerings include: –Borderless Analytics, which turns hybrid clouds into a single analytic ecosystem; –RACE (Rapid Analytic Consulting Engagement), an agile, technology agnostic methodology; –Customer Journey Analytic Solution, a set of capabilities for discerning the behavioral paths of each individual customer, determining the next best interaction and delivering a consistent, personalized brand experience through every channel and touch point; and, –Teradata Everywhere, ‘that brings the world’s most powerful massively parallel processing (MPP) analytic database’ to multiple public clouds, managed cloud, and on-premises environments including Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Teradata Managed Cloud, VMware® virtualization software, and the Teradata IntelliFlex platform. These are significant announcements that represent a major shift for Teradata, said Oliver Ratzesberger, EVP and Chief Product Officer. “We’re focusing on business solutions more than we ever have before.” Digitalization and cloud are big parts of Taradata’s strategy, he said, and these announcements continue to address these opportunities. “This becomes the foundation for everything we do from now on.” Cloud will play a growing role in the company’s Fortune 1000 customer base. Most Teradata customers (90%) say they will be on hybrid cloud by 2020; 85% are looking to buy as a service; and as much as 40% of workloads will run on public cloud by 2020, said Ratzesberger. Made possible by enhancements to the company’s QueryGrid software for analytics across heterogeneous, multi-system data stores, and Unity software for automated and seamless orchestration of a Teradata multi-system environment, the “Borderless Analytics” capability gives enterprises the ability to easily manage multi-system analytic environments and shift workloads to optimize resource utilization, while ensuring a seamless and transparent business user experience, stated the company. It also enables cross-technology analytics, giving users access to heterogeneous analytic processing engines and data stores. “Borderless Analytics is about infrastructure agility and unlocking new use cases,” said Ratzesberger. In addition the company plans to deliver the ability to intelligently capture select data changes from one Teradata system and automatically copy them to other Teradata systems, and push-button system initialization which can copy an entire database from one system to another, creating a replica which can be used for Dual Active availability, disaster recovery, quality assurance, test, or development in the first half of 2017. Available now, RACE leverages the company’s Business Value Frameworks, intellectual property captured from the Teradata’s experience...

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Teradata: Back To The Future With Customer Focus
Sep14

Teradata: Back To The Future With Customer Focus

ATLANTA: Despite strong financial performance, and a leadership position in one of today’s hottest markets, analytics, questions continue to circulate around Teradata Corporation (TDC), which has gathered 3,000 customers (versus 5,000 in 2015, although SAS is holding a similar gathering this week) and partners for its annual Partner conference. In August the company announced higher revenues — $599 million versus $559.23M — and earnings per share — $0.71vs $0.60 — than predicted by analysts, but the positive results couldn’t stop last week’s market slide, when TDC shares fell 4.24%, as analysts put thumbs down to the company’s prospects. Teradata’s future is dim, wrote analyst Thomas Dinsmore, publisher of the Big Analytics Blog, back in February, and under the previous management. While it’s been struggling since 2013, he believes it has the potential to be a stable and profitable company, but not a growth company, unless it makes some big changes. ‘Companies with a clear growth vision can invest heavily in sales, marketing and engineering; stable companies must be lean. Teradata now spends more “below the line” — engineering, sales, marketing, general and administrative functions — than it did in 2012, when it seemed poised for growth… Meanwhile, while the company invested a little over $600 million in research and development over the past three years, it spent $1.6 billion repurchasing its own stock… A company that spends three times as much buying its own stock as it spends on R&D is a company that has no confidence in the growth potential of its own business, and no ideas for building a better product.’ Several months later at the Teradata Influencer Summit, new management, a new architecture, more apps and IP, and, most importantly, a more urgent move to the cloud, things were looking brighter, noted Doug Henschen for Constellation Research. ‘As CEO Lund put it at the outset of the Summit, Teradata has great technology, smart people and an awesome customer base. Now that distractions — such as the divested Aprimo marketing business — are out of the way, Teradata has clearly refocused on its core competency. Now it’s a matter of execution and delivering great technology in smarter, more flexible and easier-to-consume ways.’ Speaking to a group of analysts and journalists at Partners, recently demoted (promoted?) from the board, and active with TDC since 2004, President & CEO Vic Lund said the company has been working on a new strategy for some time. “We have gone through the process of how we are actually changing: we are going to be business focused, not technology focused.” While technology will support this customer-centric approach, this apparent reversal is not as...

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IT Operations Analytics from the Source

One of the top uses of big data today is IT operations analytics. This makes sense. By nature, IT components are designed to log all of their many status messages, and this information is generated with debug, tracking, and audit purposes in mind. The aggregate output, however, can be a logistical problem in itself. For each device, some poor sysadmin has to decide what level of logging is desired, and then live with the consequences of that decision. Set the logging threshold to “errors only” and important context will be missing when it’s time to diagnose an issue. Set the logging criteria to “everything” and staggering amounts of data will be generated, often too much to process, and certainly much of little or no value. Limit the time period to an hour or a day, and the key information may have been overwritten by the time it’s needed, and then the problem will have to be recreated. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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