The Future’s Looking Bright(er) For Cisco
Jun08

The Future’s Looking Bright(er) For Cisco

SAN DIEGO: It’s been a wild run-up to Cisco Live, June 7-11, with executive shakeups, acquisitions, product announcements and a communications forecast predicting that the future should be very bright over the next few years for networking’s powerhouse. Of course its competitors, alternative technologies, customers and a wonky economy will have their say in just how this will all play out, but as the old saying goes, so far, so good. Named as John Chambers replacement on May 4 (to be effective July 26), incoming CEO Chuck Robbins is wasting no time putting his stamp on the organization with sweeping management changes. Last week he named the 10 members of his leadership team (with more to come): Pankaj Patel, EVP, Chief Development Officer; Kelly Kramer, EVP and Chief Financial Officer; Rebecca Jacoby, SVP, Operations; Francine Katsoudas, SVP, Chief People Officer; Hilton Romanski, SVP Chief Technology and Strategy Officer; Karen Walker, SVP, Chief Marketing Officer; Chris Dedicoat, SVP, Worldwide Sales; Joe Cozzolino, SVP, Services; Mark Chandler, SVP and General Counsel; and Dr. Ruba Borno, VP, Growth Initiatives and Chief of Staff. “Our strategy is working, and with the leadership team I’m announcing today, I’m extremely confident we will move even faster, innovate like never before, and pull away from the competition,” said Robbins, in a prepared statement.  “This is a remarkable team, with a diverse set of experiences, expertise and backgrounds to accelerate our innovation and execution, simplify how we do business, drive operational rigor in all we do, and inspire our amazing employees to be the best that they can be.” His former bosses, co-presidents Rob Lloyd and Gary Moore will leave the company late next month. Padmasree Warrior, Chief Technology and Strategy Officer, and Edzard Overbeek, SVP of Services, will move into strategic advisor roles, effective immediately and stay through the transition, although Warrior is rumored to be on her way out too. Wim Elfrink, EVP for Industry Solutions and Chief Globalisation Officer, will retire effective July 25. Cisco was also quick to act in making sure departing executives did not come back to haunt them by joining their competitors. Moore and Lloyd reportedly signed separation agreements and general releases from Cisco effective July 25, which included a one-year noncompete agreement, saying they will not work for a total of 29 competitors or risk losing benefits. The list includes: AWS, Arista Networks, Dell, Ericsson, HP, Juniper Networks, Microsoft, Nokia, VMware, Check Point Software Technologies, FireEye, Fortinet, Symantec and Palo Alto Networks. A day prior to the executive shuffle, Cisco announced it intends to acquire Piston Cloud Computing, which will ‘help accelerate the product, delivery, and operational capabilities of Cisco Intercloud Services, according to...

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IBM Expands Cloud Centers/Partnerships/Clients

IBM announced a broad expansion of its global cloud computing network to 48 cloud centers. The company will reach enterprise customers at 11 new locations, including IBM Cloud centers in Frankfurt, Mexico City and Tokyo. These centers further expand IBM’s global cloud footprint which includes facilities in Mumbai, London, Amsterdam, Beijing, Hong Kong, Singapore, Melbourne, Toronto, Dallas and Raleigh, N.C. which opened this year. The new IBM Cloud center facilities are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and offer an array of solutions. These include proven cloud resiliency services that guarantee customers up times of 99.99 percent across any IT environment, including traditional IT, and public, private and hybrid cloud deployments. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Cisco: Cloudy With A Chance… Of 3X The Meatballs!
Nov04

Cisco: Cloudy With A Chance… Of 3X The Meatballs!

Like last year’s edition, Cisco’s latest version of its [URL?] Global Cloud Index (2013–2018) forecast is for more – a lot more – cloud. According to the report, datacenter traffic – datacenter-to-user traffic, datacenter-to-datacenter traffic and traffic that remains within datacenters – is expected to nearly triple, with the cloud expected to represent 76% of the total datacenter traffic by 2018, up from 54% of the 2013 traffic. Each year the survey brings in additional data sources, and expands its analysis, Cisco’s Shruti Jain, Senior Analyst, SP Thought Leadership, told IT Trends & Analysis. “This year we covered public versus private segmentation, which we haven’t done in the past.” Other areas covered include: datacenter traffic; cloud service delivery models, i.e. IaaS, PaaS; Internet of Everything; and global cloud readiness. “Basically, we’re seeing growth in datacenter traffic.” The public-versus-private findings were a surprise, said Jain. “Private cloud is much bigger than public cloud.” It wasn’t completely unexpected, she said, because private cloud was what’s leading the cloud deployment public cloud adoption is picking up. “The share is going to increase; but it will still stay less than private cloud”. Jain said the public cloud is not ready for the enterprise market, which is still in the test/development phase, testing public cloud from the performance and security perspectives. However, public clouds are growing much faster than private clouds, with enterprises willing to experiment to move less critical workloads to public clouds. Security, performance compliance and even cost issues remain for enterprises, she said. “We do not see them in a hurry to shut down their private clouds. It will be hybrid at best during the forecast period”, said Jain. Although public cloud workloads are projected to have strong growth; by 2018, 69% (113.5 million) of cloud workloads will still be supported by private cloud data centers, down from 78% (44.2 million) in 2013. There’s big growth happening on the datacenter side, she said. Cloud workloads have already surpassed traditional datacenter workloads, especially in the North American market, and they will continue to decline, said Jain. Regarding workload density, “cloud density will outpace datacenter threefold.” Growth may be strong, but this year’s study did find that growth flattening somewhat, said Cisco’s Arielle Sumits. Last year’s growth was predicted at 25% compound annual growth rate during the forecast period, but that number is now down to 23% CAGR. She attributed the flattening to several elements, including a somewhat maturing market, and greater efficiencies in datacenters. One area where datacenter growth has accelerated is datacenter-to-datacenter, mainly because of CDN and intercloud traffic, she said. The key takeaway from this year’s study is that the...

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Equinix Invokes Metcalfe’s Law

When we think of cloud computing, we tend to think of high profile, publicly available offerings, such as Amazon’s AWS or Microsoft’s Azure. That is in keeping with our tendency to view public, private and hybrid cloud offerings from an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), platform-as-a-service (PaaS), or software-as-a-service (SaaS) perspective. While that perspective is a reasonable way to view the cloud world, we must not ignore the basic private or public data center facilities infrastructures, capabilities and services upon which all of these depend. Equinix is a leading public player in providing these data centers services, such as collocation and networking connectivity via facilities spread across the world. The company’s approach is both very interesting and important. Let’s see why. For more information, EMAIL davidhill@mesabigroup.com NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Cloud Computing Pitfalls

We are still coming to grips with the impact of the Xen and Bash shell issues that have sprung up lately. The issues are enough to make us realize that there are some serious pitfalls to cloud computing—or more to the point, pitfalls to using only one cloud service provider. We talk about using live migration and other tools to alleviate downtime, but have we really thought through the use of these tools at cloud scale? What was the impact on your environment, and how have you decided to alleviate that impact? Those are the questions that come out of the latest set of issues with cloud computing. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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