IBM’s… Back to Kicking Butt

I’m ex-IBM myself and it gives me great pleasure to see my old firm do well. Well this quarter they didn’t disappoint with significant improvement in their new business initiatives, which are just short of 50 percent of revenue. You remember the mainframe, that platform that supposedly was dead back in the 1980s? Well, once again IBM showcased there is evidently life after death because that puppy grew more than a whopping 70 percent...

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No More Dealing with Infrastructure…

The most exciting announcement during AWS re:Invent for cloud computing infrastructure foundation was Fargate. There were a slew of new announcements and I don’t want to de-emphasize the other ones too much, but this one was the most interesting to me. First, a bit of background. There’s lot of confusion on VMs, containers, and functions. Here are the differences: The key thing is that the VMs allow a server to run as one...

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The Relevance of Networking at AWS re:Invent

This year was my first re:Invent and it was an impressive event. There were over forty-three thousand people in attendance and the show occupied a number of hotels along the Vegas strip. It wasn’t just that there were a lot of people there, it was that there were a lot of people who wanted to be there – after attending hundreds of trade shows and user group events you get to know the difference. There was a buzz and excitement at the...

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IBM Advances Cluster Virtualization…

On the classic Groucho Marx quiz show You Bet Your Life if a contestant accidently said the “secret word” of the day, he or she would win a prize. There’s no prize included in this commentary, but the secret word of the day is virtualization, especially as it relates to IBM’s new HPC and AI solutions. IBM defines virtualization as “A technology that makes a set of shared resources appear to each workload as if they were dedicated only...

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Enterprise Networks and Telco Clouds on a Collision Course

The Internet of Things will move more processing to telecom suppliers’ facilities. Network engineers have traditionally treated networks managed by their telecom suppliers as outside their immediate domain of concern. The telco network was brought into the data center, appropriate routes or peering set up, and that was it. Enterprise workloads typically don’t run directly on telco networks for many reasons, including...

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