Containers are Here! What About Container Security?

The industry is gaga for container technologies like Docker and for good reason. According to ESG research, containers make up about 19% of hybrid cloud production workloads today, but in just 2 years’ time, containers will make up one-third of hybrid cloud production workloads. Not surprisingly, rapid growth and proliferation of application containers have led to several security issues: -35% of cybersecurity professionals claim that their organization’s current server workload security solutions do no support the same functionality for containers, requiring the use of separate container security technologies. This adds cost and complexity to safeguarding valuable IT assets. -34% of cybersecurity professionals claim that they need to verify images stored in container registries meet their organization’s security and compliance requirements. Again, they tend to need specialized tools to accomplish this task. -33% of cybersecurity professionals claim that there is a lack of mature solutions available for container security. This is understandable as container security is dominated by startups and point tools at present (i.e., Aporeto, Aqua Security, Cavirin, CloudPassage, Layered Insight, Neuvector, StackRox, Twistlock, etc.). We are seeing more and more coverage from established players as well like Tenable Networks, Trend Micro, VMware, etc. Cybersecurity pros should pay close attention to this market as vendors and tools are evolving quickly. -30% of cybersecurity professionals claim that the potential for container sprawl creates loose access controls between containers that could leave their production environment more vulnerable. This indicates process and management problems that lead to security vulnerabilities. -27% of cybersecurity professionals claim that portability makes containers more susceptible to “in motion” compromises. And a lot of security pros don’t have the tools to monitor transient containers and microservices as they appear and disappear. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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No More Dealing with Infrastructure…

The most exciting announcement during AWS re:Invent for cloud computing infrastructure foundation was Fargate. There were a slew of new announcements and I don’t want to de-emphasize the other ones too much, but this one was the most interesting to me. First, a bit of background. There’s lot of confusion on VMs, containers, and functions. Here are the differences: The key thing is that the VMs allow a server to run as one big piece (OS + whatever apps are installed), containers allow applications (which includes providing microservices, but no OS, but the underlying system beneath the container layer provides the Linux interface) to run, and serverless is a place to run code (or functions). Each stage enables slicing a workload into smaller pieces. Fargate is a system that enables you to run deploy your containers on AWS, and do so in a way that’s just as easy as getting VMs from EC2. This allows developers to ignore the setting up of infrastructure. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success
Sep28

Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success

Last week Hitachi ($81 billion annual revenues and more than 800 subsidiaries, with products including consumer appliances, electric power generation as well as IT) announced it was combining its former storage/IT business unit Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), together with Pentaho (BI software) and Hitachi Insight Group (IoT products and services), into a new unit focused on the operational technology (OT)/IT/IoT space. The new venture, Hitachi Vantara, also unveiled a number of products, services and partnerships focused on most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including Big Data and analytics, cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. So was this a bold move to combine assets that have a lot more potential upside in a US-based, IoT-focused business, or a desperate attempt to pump new life into stagnating segments? HDS may be the dominant member of the IoT troika, but with only a tiny share of a barely growing enterprise storage market, the grass looks much greener in an IoT market expected to reach between $1.2 to $2 trillion by 2021, with double-digit compound annual growth. The research data varies wildly, but it is certain that IoT is going to be a huge opportunity for the foreseeable future: –73% of executives are either researching or currently launching IoT projects; -manufacturing-based IoT connections grew 84% between 2016 and 2017, followed by energy & utilities (41%), transportation and distribution (40%), smart cities and communities (19%) and healthcare and pharma (11%); -the retail IoT market is forecast to surpass $30 billion by 2024; -the manufacturing IoT market is forecast to surpass $150 billion by 2024; -the IoT platform market (i.e. Vantara’s Lumada) is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16 billion by 2020; and, -project-based IoT services represented the highest percentage of market opportunity in 2016, and will gain nearly one point of market share to 56.7% by 2021, approaching $30.8 billion, with the Americas (52.2%) and EMEA (34.4%) substantially outperforming Asia/Pacific (13.4%) last year. It would appear to be very good news — at least potentially — for Hitachi, because it’s name was nowhere to be found in key players in the Persistence Market Research study. The featured vendors were: IBM, Microsoft, AT&T, Apple, Google, General Electric, Samsung, Comcast, Intel, Cisco Systems, Oracle, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Fujitsu, Qualcomm Technologies, Honeywell International, Accenture PLC, ARM, Amazon Web Services, SAP SE, Zebra Technologies, and Texas Instruments. From Data Storage to Business Outcomes Vantara represents a change in how Hitachi, or at least some of its IT assets, are presented, said analyst George Crump, StorageSwiss. ‘It does not want to compete with Dell and HP for storage deals. It wants to compete with...

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HDS Metamorphisis: From Storage 5th to IoT 1st
Sep21

HDS Metamorphisis: From Storage 5th to IoT 1st

LAS VEGAS: HDS is dead. Long live Hitachi Vantara. By combining its former storage/IT business unit (origins date back to 1979, but debuted as HDS in 1989) together with Pentaho (BI software acquired in 2015) and Hitachi Insight Group (IoT products and services, i.e. Vantara 1.0, formed in 2016: ), $81 billion Hitachi is repositioning HDS from a fifth-place finish in enterprise storage to first place in the operational technology (OT)/IT/IoT space. In addition to launching the reorganization at Hitachi NEXT 2017 in front of more than 2,000 attendees and more thousands online, the new and improved IoT business unit draped itself in most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including Big Data and analytics, cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. Although HDS was recently upgraded from Challenger to Leader in Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Solid-State Arrays, the hottest segment in enterprise storage, and the unit was contributing around 20% of Hitachi’s revenues, it has been on a downward trend the last couple of years. The overall enterprise storage market grew only 2.9% last quarter (to $10.8 billion), and fifth-place HDS accounted for only $413 million, down 3.8%, and well behind first-place HPE and second-place Dell EMC. A year ago it had 5.7% of the enterprise storage market revenues, while two years ago it had a 7.8% share of worldwide external storage revenue during the quarter.   While storage is stuck in commodity hell and HDS appears to be falling behind, IoT is experiencing exponential growth. Back in February Gartner predicted 8.4 billion things will be connected in 2017, up 31% from a year ago. That’s almost $2 trillion on endpoints and services this year, and we’re looking at 20.4 billion connected things by 2020,  with hardware spending expected to reach almost $3 trillion. IDC is not as optimistic, putting the IoT market at just under $1.4 trillion by 2021. That may be less than half of Gartner’s forecast, but it still represents an incredible opportunity for Vantara, which is pushing a more holistic approach than most of its competitors. “The true value of IoT is being realized when the software and services come together to enable the capture, interpretation, and action on data produced by IoT endpoints,” said Carrie MacGillivray, vice president, Internet of Things and Mobility at IDC.” The tagline for NEXT was ‘Lead What’s Next’, that was reinforced by another, more enduring Hitachi theme, ‘Double Bottom Line’, marrying the drive for business success together with social responsibility. The launch of Ventara “marks a monumental change for Hitachi”, said Hitachi, Ltd. president and CEO Toshiaki Higashihara, in his keynote on Tuesday. The company was...

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Hitachi Vantara: ‘Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!’

LAS VEGAS: Regardless of whether this is just a repackaging of existing assets, or something that shakes up the operational technology (OT) and IT industries, Hitachi Vantara did make a number of announcements to grease its way onto the IoT center stage. In addition to IoT, its news covered most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. The first two product launches featured Lumada, its IoT platform, and included a number of enhancements, as well as an appliance. Initially unveiled back in May 2016 by Vantara’s predecessor, Hitachi Insight Group, Lumada is a ‘comprehensive, enterprise-grade IoT core platform with an open and adaptable architecture that simplifies IoT solution creation and customization. ‘ Lumada 2.0 is now available in a standalone version and has been updated with a portable architecture so that it can run both on-premises or in the cloud, and to support industrial IoT deployments both at the edge and in the core. Due out later this year, the Hitachi IoT Appliance, powered by Lumada, is a pre-validated plug-and-play solution that enables users to rapidly connect, monitor and extract actionable insights from their business and industrial assets. The company says it can be deployed and production-ready in under an hour. Vantara was also active in the cloud segment, announcing a partnership with VMware and Mesosphere to ‘expand the use cases for private and hybrid cloud with pre-engineered service catalogs and rate card pricing.’ Available through an early customer adoption program, the Hitachi Enterprise Cloud with VMware vRealize 7.3 automates the creation, deployment and management of container hosts and cloud-native applications as a service, across a multi-vendor, multi-cloud infrastructure, while HEC’s new Container Platform provides hybrid cloud resources for DevOps that utilize microservices architecture with a turnkey, end-to-end container as a service environment. Available now, Hitachi Unified Compute Platform (UCP) CI [Converged Infrastructure] is a new family of converged infrastructure systems that feature the company’s Virtual Storage Platform (VSP) storage with Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Combined with the UCP Advisor 2.0 software, due out later this year, they deliver what Hitachi calls ‘a modern, integrated data-centric framework’ that can ‘deploy enterprise applications faster, with improved performance, higher uptime, simplified troubleshooting and enhanced security features’, in addition to providing ‘lower operational costs, reduced complexity and risk, and better utilization of data’. On Day 2 of Hitachi NEXT the company announced a partnership with BT, the large telecom services provider formerly known as British Telecom. Under the terms of the deal, the partners will collaborate on new solutions for industrial and enterprise IoT, with the initial focus on ‘ exploring and designing asset intelligence...

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