…Converged and Hyperconverged – Predictions for 2018

I was waiting on releasing my 2018 predictions for converged and hyperconverged infrastrucuture because I wanted to leverage a key data point from our recent spending intentions research. From an IT infrastructure standpoint, this year’s data had some particularly compelling data points regarding areas of opportunity where senior IT decision makers feel they can significantly streamline costs. More than half of organizations (54%) feel their on-premises storage and/or networking infrastructure is where their costs can be streamlined. My colleague Mark Peters recently wrote a great brief on the subject, but here is my quick take… This data can be interpreted differently, but here is my take. There is an immediate interpretation of streamlining costs by simply eliminating those costs – moving some infrastructure to the cloud, which can offer both CapEx and OpEx savings. It should be noted that in many cases, an on-premises infrastructure still exists, but it doesn’t have to be as large as it used to be. Looking just at the on-prem side of the hybrid approach, organizations will want to consolidate their physical footprint and they’ll want to make sure they do it cost-effectively while still meeting their application requirements. A bonus would be delivering a cloud-like experience so organizations can have a similar consumption model on-prem or in the cloud. What technology helps to fit the bill? Converged and hyperconverged infrastructures. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Lenovo and Nimble Storage Join Forces

Today, Lenovo and Nimble Storage announced a joint partnership, furthering the capabilities and the reach of both companies. The near–term product offering that results from the partnership will be Lenovo’s ThinkAgile CX converged system available on October 28th, with Nimble providing the storage element. From a business perspective, the deal makes so much sense for both companies; the real question may be what took them so long. First, let’s start with the obvious benefits. Lenovo gets access to Nimble’s Predictive Flash technology for its converged offering, rounding out its storage portfolio and adding a larger scale converged offering to pair with its existing hyperconverged solutions from the partnership with Nutanix. Nimble Storage gains access to Lenovo’s substantial enterprise sales channel. While the immediate impact will likely be a boost in revenue for both companies, this partnership looks like it goes beyond the simple reselling of technology. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Winter is coming…for the storage industry

We’re about halfway through the latest season of HBO’s Game of Thrones, and I’ve been every bit as transfixed to the series as every other devotee I know. I may have gotten started late, but I’m definitely in it for the long haul now. One of the things that was helpful for me as I got caught up was using the internet’s various nerd communities to understand all of the nuances and details of the families and their histories. For example, the show has used “winter is coming” as a tagline from the beginning, and I wanted to get some context on what exactly that was referring to. I turned to the Wikia page for the book series, and came away with an appreciation for what the Starks mean when they say it. To read the complete article, CLICK ON AUTHOR’S...

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…Converged and Hyperconverged Choice, Fear Abounds

One of the most persistent concerns shared by many IT professionals is the fear that once a vendor technology decision is made, the die is cast and there is no turning back. For better or worse, you’re in for the long haul. This fear of being “over the vendor barrel” is often a powerful motivator to retain as much independence as possible so as not to be subject to the whims of any single technology organization. In fact, according to ESG research, the top 3 concerns businesses have with deploying integrated computing platforms (ICP) like converged and hyperconverged systems is: 1. Too expensive 2. Vendor lock-in 3. Giving too much control to one vendor To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Rack & Rule: Dell Updates 4-Socket 4U R920 Server
Apr29

Rack & Rule: Dell Updates 4-Socket 4U R920 Server

With the x86-server market growing, but undergoing a lot of turbulence – converged/engineered systems, Lenovo taking over IBM’s System X business and HP getting closer to its expiry date (in November it will become two mini-HPs), Dell is looking to increase its second-place position with new rack servers targeted primarily at the fading but still significant Unix market (the non-x86 market presents a $9.1 billion addressable market in 2015). According to the company, the 4-socket 4U PowerEdge R930 is designed for such enterprise applications as in-memory databases, customer relationship management (CRM) and enterprise resource planning (ERP). In addition to the R930, Dell also updated its PowerEdge VRTX and M1000e converged platforms, and introduced the PowerEdge FC830 and the M830 blade servers. We’re pushing double-digit performance gains on something that was already leading the world, said Brian Payne, Executive Director, Dell Server Solutions. The company launched the R930’s predecessor, the R920 high-end server, 14 months ago, targeted at workhorse applications such as ERP, e-commerce and a wide-range of databases, i.e. workloads that often aren’t virtualized over reliability concerns. He said Dell will continue to sell the R920 for the remainder of 2015: a number of web sites are already offering discounts up to 40% on the line. “There’s still a strong market opportunity for x86 servers and specifically 4-socket servers,” Payne told IT Trends & Analysis. One size will not fit all needs in the X86 server space, so Dell will continue provide a broad array of server solutions, he added. Two weeks ago Dell extended its PowerEdge FX converged architecture, which was initially introduced six months ago, positioned as yet another Cisco killer (this time the alleged victim is UCS, not Catalyst). In addition to announcing three new FX modules, it stated the x86-based platform can host 72% more virtual desktop users in 10X less space than UCS. According to the latest numbers from Gartner, server shipments grew 4.8% in Q4, while revenues increased 2.2%. Dell came in second behind HP (27.9% of revenue, up 1.5% year-over-year), with 17.3% ($2.42 billion), up a very respectable 16.9%. Not unexpectedly, the biggest swing came courtesy of the Lenovo purchase of IBM’s System X business, which saw the former soar 743.4% and the latter plummet 50.6%. Dell’s server numbers are impressive, but they mask another trend reshaping the server market, the emergence of engineered or integrated platforms (i.e. workload-specific systems like Oracle’s Exadata platform) and modular or converged systems (i.e. Cisco/VCE/HP), according to IDC. While still just a fraction of the overall server market, since IDC started tracking these segments in Q1 13, sales of engineered systems have grown by about a...

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