Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future
Apr20

Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future

Pretty much everybody agrees the world is moving to the cloud — public, private (which includes managed as a service) but predominantly the combination of both (hybrid) — and the primary questions are what to move where, and when (how is also a huge concern, but while not easy, it’s really just fiddly bits). Four years ago Cisco started using the concept of the ‘world of many clouds’ to describe its customer-choice model, and earlier this month data and analytics leader Teradata unveiled database license flexibility across hybrid cloud deployments. There has been an “aggressive uptick in interest, if not deployment of public cloud” by the company’s global 1000 customers, said Brian Wood, Director, Cloud Marketing, Teradata. He told IT Trends & Analysis that over 90% of their customers plan to have hybrid IT by 2020, and “85% want to consume as a service.” The company has 100 customers in the multi-petabyte range, with the largest customer in the 90Pb range, so licensing becomes critical, smoothing out the investments, he said. With portability, “ it’s have your cake and eat it too.” This massive move to the cloud, with a mix of public, private, hybrid and on-premise resources means portability — data, software and licenses — is a critical component. Cloud lock-in is no more palatable than vendor lock-in, and while only one vendor, with a limited set of offerings — albeit a set of significant offerings — Teradata says its newest capability, an industry first, gives its data management solution for analytics the ‘very best value proposition.’ “Not only is the database license portable across the hybrid cloud options, but so are workloads, enabled by a common code base in all deployments,” said John Dinning, EVP and Chief Business Officer, Teradata, in a prepared statement. “This flexibility is a first in our industry and means that data models, applications, and development efforts can be migrated or transferred unchanged across any ecosystem.” Looking ahead reinforces the growing cloud-first future, although this cloud shift is not just about cloud, stated Gartner. “This cloud-first orientation will continue to increase the rate of cloud adoption and, consequently, cloud shift,” said Ed Anderson, research vice president. “Organizations embracing dynamic, cloud-based operating models position themselves for cost optimization and increased competitiveness.” Spending on datacenter systems is forecast to be $175 billion in 2017, growing to $181 billion through 2020. However, while DC budgets will be relatively flat, spending on cloud system infrastructure services (IaaS) will grow from $34 billion in 2017 to $71 billion through 2020, account for 39% of total spending on datacenter systems. The latest market data/forecasts demonstrate the headlong rush to...

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Cloud Dependency: Ubiquitous Networking

Use of the cloud depends upon ubiquitous networking. And not just everywhere, but extremely high speed as well. This came to mind as I was sitting at the top of a mountain in a national park and heard someone ask Siri a question. Siri’s response was that the network was not in reach. This struck me as funny, then odd, then sent me down the path of ubiquitous networking. We are in the age of the Internet of Things (IoT), and if we do not have a network, then IoT fails rather spectacularly. So, what are the real requirements for IoT? We have already mentioned a ubiquitous network, and that network apparently needs to be a public network with everyone and everything on it. I feel, given how people are, that that network should also be the fastest network humanity can possibly make. People and things expect to transfer quite a bit of data in as short a time as possible. How many of you have upgraded your household, business, or organizational wireless to 5G Wi-Fi or 802.11ac? Granted, new wireless devices are faster, smarter, and much more secure, but the key is faster. People want access quickly. IoT transmits a huge amount of data. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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Reducing Storage TCO with Private Cloud Storage

With the burgeoning growth of data, many legacy storage systems simply struggle to keep the total cost of ownership (TCO) in check. This article will look at the ways that Private Cloud Storage can address the TCO shortcomings of legacy storage. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Storage Switzerland Weekly...

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HDS: Measuring Up to Transformational Trends

All IT vendors feel the challenge of the powerful forces changing the IT industry. Multi-product vendors are acutely impacted by these changes as they have to decide how to reshape their product and service portfolios. Just as importantly, IT customers need to understand where these vendors are going. Today I’ll consider Hitachi Data Systems (HDS) as a vendor that is known for its solid technology, but whose focus in specific areas, such as data-driven storage, impels its broader strategy. Recently, HDS held a meeting in Colorado Springs, Colorado for a selected group of industry analysts. This discussion takes advantage of the deep insight that HDS kindly presented on its vision, strategy, and future direction, although the selection of topics to discuss, their order and emphasis, and my take on what this all means are my responsibilty. For more information, EMAIL davidhill@mesabigroup.com NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Video Blog: What Does HP Stand For These Days?

Analyst events (i.e. HP’s event earlier this month) are about many things – strategy, product details, tactics, competitive actions, user stories, and corporate measurement statistics, just to give a few examples. Those are some of the factual aspects….but there’s also another side to things which is very important. Big events such as this are also about setting a tone, and communicating an attitude. Looked at in this perspective the HP event this month was a noticeable success. From a somewhat deliberate yet occasionally dour emphasis a few years ago (no complaints, just an observation) the demeanor and emotion in the “big tent” sessions has shifted, just as much as the private hallway conversations. Take a look at what ESG analysts (Terri McClure, Jason Buffington, Mark Bowker and me) had to say at the event: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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