Dell Data Guardian…

Earlier this week, I was briefed on Dell Data Guardian—a new offering from what is now arguably the biggest tech company in the world, focused on making file level security braindead-easy to use. Big companies making things easy for users doesn’t happen that often, largely because the bigger a firm becomes the more focused on volume buyers, regulations/compliance, and politics it gets and users tend to drop into noise. So, when a firm of Dell Technology’s size brings out a tool focused to make a critical corporate requirement—security—easy for users, I find it interesting and a behavior we should all work harder to encourage. Apparently, and this should be no surprise, according to a recent Dell security survey the lack of an easy tool to better secure shared information is limiting collaboration both inside and outside the company. Dell’s Data Guardian solution is targeted at fixing the problem of secure file sharing both inside and outside the firm. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell… Reducing the Complexity and Cost of IoT Development

The Internet of Things (IoT) has been the subject of such attention, so much opinionating and so many remarkable claims of progress that it would be natural to assume that IoT is wheels up, rapidly gaining altitude and heading toward a future of eternal sunshine. That is, in a word, foolishness. Though it is true that numerous IT vendors and their customers have successfully implemented IoT solutions and infrastructures, many of those were one-off efforts that required substantial effort, time and customization. Those aren’t bad things necessarily but if IoT is ever to achieve the kind of global acceptance and success that proponents envision, it needs to become more simple, standardized, certain and cost-effective. That’s why The Linux Foundation’s announcement of its new EdgeX Foundry project is so intriguing. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Karen Quintos, Dell and the Ultimate Differentiator

Specialization in the C-suite is becoming increasingly common, and a role that is starting to gain more visibility is the Chief Customer Officer (CCO). Still, only a small percentage of enterprises currently employ CCOs, and few, if any, business schools offer formal course tracks for the position. By their nature, successful business and business organizations must be customer-centric. So why would an organization need a senior executive and team that focuses solely on customers and customer relationships? To develop a better understanding of the CCO role, how it shapes business strategy and how it enhances an organization’s relationship with its customers and partners, I recently spoke with Karen Quintos, who became Dell’s EVP and CCO in 2016, and is also the company’s highest ranking woman executive. Quintos believes that customer relationships are the ultimate differentiator for companies in all industries. With this in mind, she took a unique approach to defining her CCO responsibilities. In addition to leading Dell’s customer advocacy and experience programs, she also has responsibility for Dell’s strategy and programs for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Diversity & Inclusion, and Entrepreneurship – business imperatives that she found really matter to customers. Quintos joined Dell in 2000 and held a number of VP positions before becoming the company’s SVP and CMO in 2010. Prior to Dell, Quintos was Citigroup’s VP of Global Operations and Technology. She also spent 12 years with Merck in marketing, operations and supply chain leadership positions. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell Extends the Value/Use Cases for Thin Clients

Like many traditional IT products, PCs are in transition along with the customers they serve. Doomsayers who, beginning with the Apple iPad’s introduction in 2010, were quick to proclaim the “death of the PC” have been largely wrong. But at the same time, evolving markets and slowing sales have resulted in significant challenges for PC ecosystem and channel participants. What are PC vendors doing to address this? For many, a little bit of everything, including aiming at high value/high margin segments such as gaming and virtual reality systems, stretching the value of lower end systems by leveraging supply chain economics and manufacturer relationships, and making the most of complementary technologies, like new CPUs and GPUs, ultra-high def-displays, capacious memory and SSDs and high performance USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt connectivity options. Many of those technological innovations are also percolating into alternative PC form factors and the solutions, including thin and zero clients. This week’s introduction by Dell of its newest Wyse offering provides an interesting perspective on how this trend is progressing in those markets. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How Dell EMC Is Displacing HPE Storage…

I’m doing a series of win/loss reports and one of the interesting trends is Dell EMC storage is replacing HPE storage pretty aggressively. I think this is showcasing the use of what is termed a “Halo” product in the consumer market to open the account up and showcase the better service experience EMC is providing. At the heart of this experience advantage is a number of things—a more stable and mature workforce, a realization that people are cogs but have intrinsic value as employees, and a customer loyalty measurement process and executive metric that currently leads the industry. Let me walk you through the case. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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