Intel Makes AI Understandable and Accessible…

Though they populate an industry that prides itself on tackling and solving complex puzzles, many IT vendors prefer simplistic story-telling. That’s partly due to simplicity being easier to sell than complexity, even if it fails to address many or even most of the issues related to complicated engineering efforts. But simple tales also feed the industry’s love of self-promotional mythologies, including the triumph and massive remuneration of plucky entrepreneurs. I raise this issue because storytelling shorthand also tends to infect areas where accuracy is a critical component, like still-emerging technologies. Keeping things easy may seem to be beneficial in terms of helping an audience initially understand difficult subjects. But relying on simplistic exposition can also mask over-inflated claims and promote questionable reports about a technology’s potential for commercial success. We’ve seen this dynamic occur many times in the past—virtual reality headsets and associated technologies are just one good example. More than four years after Facebook paid an unprecedented $2B for VR start-up Oculus—a deal that was supposed to rapidly propel VR into the commercial mainstream—the industry and vendors continues to be hindered by many of the same core technological barriers that existed in 2014. So, it’s a pleasure to find vendors that are willing and able to discuss complex work in both realistic and understandable terms. That was certainly the case at Intel DevCon 2018, the inaugural conference for artificial intelligence (AI) developers that Intel hosted recently in San Francisco. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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HP Tests Mobile DevOps For The Real World
Oct28

HP Tests Mobile DevOps For The Real World

In the mobile-first, apps-driven world speed and quality are the table stakes and HP is looking to deal itself a winning hand with Mobile Center, an on-premise solution for testing mobile application functionality and performance across real-world network conditions on real-devices. The company said mobile app developers require solutions that can rapidly adapt and test new environments, and that connect to their overall application lifecycle management strategies. Now shipping, the solution is intended to address the critical need for a consistent and enjoyable app experience, said Genefa Murphy, Sr. Director, Application Delivery Management HP Software. “Only HP can deliver a unique blend of domain expertise, big data analytics, and seamless integration with an overall application lifecycle management suite to enable mobile DevOps teams to predict how an application will respond in the real world, no matter the device, OS or context,” she said in a prepared statement. We want to help out customers essentially extend best practices to mobile devices, “because there are so many nuances that come about on the real device,” she told IT Trends & Analysis in a phone briefing. “We’re bringing in the real device element and making sure the app is going to behave in the real world as you expect”. Mobile Center is replacing HP Unified Functional Testing (HP UFT) software, formerly known as QuickTest Professional, which will stop shipping in January 2015. Charlie Dai, Principal Consultant, Forrester Research, think it’s time for technology decision-makers and enterprise architects to seriously consider adopting mobile app delivery management solutions and to evaluate HP for that purpose. Although his new blog was targeted at the Chinese networking market, where HP is rumored to be looking to sell at least 51% of its corporate-networking business in the country, H3C Technologies Co, he said HP’s portfolio now covers the entire mobile app life cycle, from app design, development, and optimization to distribution and monitoring. ‘At the mobile app optimization stage, HP’s Mobile Center uses a comprehensive approach to functionality, interoperability, usability, performance, and security to consolidate and automate mobile testing.’ He noted from an interoperability perspective, the product can simulate exceptional conditions such as voice or SMS interruptions and resource conflicts with camera or GPS apps. It also supports peripheral testing of components including near field communication, Bluetooth, and iBeacon. According to a recent SolarWinds survey, application performance matters. “It’s no longer just about if an application working, it’s about that application working to end user expectations,” said SolarWinds Products and Markets EVP Suaad Sait. “These survey results should be a wakeup call for IT pros everywhere.” Key findings included: -93% of business end users said application performance and...

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Security DevOps (SecDevOps)

At InfoSec World a few weeks ago, I was in a talk with Rich Mogull (@rmogull) of Securosis. Rich spoke on the concept of SecDevOps while demonstrating how he applies this concept to workloads running within Amazon. Now, some would argue that DevOps already contains security practices within the workflows. The unfortunate reality is that, in many cases, security is overlooked in the rush to get product out the door. So, how does SecDevOps differ from DevOps? Not a lot, except that it has a higher degree of security focus. The goal of SecDevOps is not to change the developers, but to get the security team involved as a part of development at carefully planned locations within the DevOps workflow. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in The Virtualization Practice...

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Open For Business: IBM Advances Cloud, Mobility Agendas
Apr29

Open For Business: IBM Advances Cloud, Mobility Agendas

LAS VEGAS: For a company that practically invented Not Invented Here — most of IBM’s history could be characterized by Does Not Play Well With Others — Big Blue’s latest cloud and mobility announcements, and the prominent roles played by both customers and partners, reinforce how IT’s still-dominant vendor is changing with the times. CAMS (cloud, analytics, mobile and social) announcements dominated the first day of Impact 2014, IBM’s annual business and IT conference (9,000-plus attendees), as well as its continued focus on the composable business (a new collaboration model between IT, line of business and development teams) and the hybrid cloud. The conference kicked off with a customer, Tangerine CEO Peter Aceto, who explained how IBM and mobility were transforming the Canadian bank. Business partners and customers continued to play a prominent role throughout the keynotes, briefings and panels that followed. The product and service announcements included: an enterprise cloud marketplace targeted at three audiences, developers (Dev), IT managers (Ops) and business leaders (Biz); more than 30 new cloud services are available in BlueMix, its Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) to help developers integrate applications and deploy new cloud services; the launch of the first BlueMix Garage (homage to HP?), a physical location where developers, product managers and designers can collaborate with IBM experts to innovate and deliver new cloud apps deployed onto BlueMix; and expansion of the IBM MobileFirst Application Development portfolio, including new industry-specific IBM Ready Apps, and the opening of 18 new IBM MobileFirst studios around the world to help business leaders accelerate mobile initiatives. In the press conference about the announcements, Robert LeBlanc, SVP, Software & Cloud Solutions, IBM, said the cloud marketplace is not only for IBM and its partners, but also its customers, who may also choose to make their cloud capabilities available to others, for a fee. “It’s one place where you can come, discover, try and in some cases buy….” Bob Picciano, SVP, Information & Analytics, IBM, said the company has been making a number of developer-related service announcements in recent weeks. It’s “really about empowering the next generation of developers.” Mobile and cloud go hand in hand, added Marie Wieck, GM, IBM MobileFirst. “The boundaries are really breaking down between those different silos… like cloud… and mobile…” Cloud, mobility and services figured prominently at Impact, but with celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mainframe and the recent POWER announcements, IBM’s hardware business is still a key part of its product portfolio. “They haven’t figured out how to run software without hardware” said LeBlanc. IBM has been making a lot of cloud moves recently as it looks to tap into what it calls a $250-billion...

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IBM Pulse 2014 (Part 3 of 3): IBM’s “Bold Moves”

In the end, for me, the primary theme of Pulse 2014 was this: IBM has embarked on a new journey to the public/hybrid cloud. This new IBM-as-a-Service paradigm shift necessitates changes in the way IBM engages with potential customers at every level. Developers require solutions that will enable them to develop applications more quickly and easily. Codename: BlueMix is IBM’s answer to this. Business users will demand new and easier ways to engage with IBM to incorporate social media, mobile applications and on-line communities, and IBM Service Engage is a great example of what the company can do to address this requirement. IT Operations requires management solutions that are automated and proactive, and IBM has a wealth of management products across the portfolio to improve automation and incorporate operational analytics for faster problem identification and resolution. As a result, I believe that IBM is in a great position to leverage their past experience to push in this new direction that will enable them to achieve their future goals. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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