IBM Z: Making Dev Work with Ops

Recently, Clabby Analytics attended an IBM analyst briefing on the role of Z Middleware in digital transformation. We went to learn about IBM’s DevOps environment for the IBM Z (mainframe) – its development tools, operations management environment and overall digital transformation strategies. After a full day briefing we walked away with these key findings: IBM is strongly focused on helping its customers transform their information systems into cooperative, integrated processing environments that can easily mix and match existing environments and applications with new technologies and environments. In DevOps, IBM is focusing on the use of technologies that make Z more accessible to developers in general. IBM Z offers a wealth of open APIs, support for multiple languages, numerous development tools, support for open source development environments and more – a comprehensive set of tools, utilities, APIs and languages that support an open DevOps environment on Z. In short, IBM’s approach to DevOps is to be open/integrated with the world of Open Source tools and leading 3rd party vendors (e.g. Splunk, others); In operations management, the company remains focused on: 1) monitoring of application and system behavior; 2) visibility into systems/application behavior (discovery and analysis); and, 3) predictive analysis (the ability to identify problems before they occur and address them). The key message that IBM wanted to deliver regarding operations management was that IBM has a complete suite of operations management products and is a onestop-shop for enterprise operations management needs (this includes distributed computing environments, mainframe environments, hybrid clouds, networks and more); and, IBM strongly encourages its customers to build automated testing suites. By taking the time to automate testing, IBM customers can accelerate the deployment of new digital transformation applications – improving application quality while also improving speed of application delivery. The way IBM presented its products and strategies was threefold. The company discussed: 1) the IBM Z Digital Transformation Model; 2) what the development tools marketplace needs and wants; and 3) what the operations management side-of-the-business requires. We have organized our thoughts and analysis along these lines. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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CA’s BTCS2.0: Change Is The New Normal
Jun07

CA’s BTCS2.0: Change Is The New Normal

SANTA CLARA, Calif.: Determined to be the leading toolmaker for the software-enabled, data-driven, digital transformation business phenomenon that is reshaping the world, CA Technologies held its second annual Built to Change Summit to update analysts and journalists on where it is, and where it wants to go. At last year’s BTCS the venerable software developer (1976) detailed how it was transitioning from a $4-billion legacy software giant with relatively flat sales into a more agile and fast-growing DevSecOps vendor for the the rapidly emerging DT world. Fast-forward 11 months and the company reported quarterly and annual revenue increases to $1.083 billion and $4.235 billion, respectively, and is forecasting relatively flat growth for the next quarter. In addition to its financials, CA also announced it would be laying off 800 (out of 11,000 employees) in restructuring, and adding another 500-600 staff with ‘different skills’. The company needs fewer employees with skills related to “legacy platforms” and more with skills related to software as a service, said CEO Michael Gregoire. While the company’s roots are in the mainframe, which is undergoing something of a renaissance, it is DevOps and more specifically DevSecOps where it’s future lies.Depending upon your source, DevOps is a flourishing market, especially in the enterprise. Forrester Research declared 2017 to be the year of DevOps with 50% of organizations implementing it, and 2018 will be the year of enterprise DevOps. ‘DevOps has reached “Escape Velocity”’, noted Principal Analyst Robert Stroud, with momentum occurring within all industry sectors but with healthcare, banking, insurance and manufacturing sectors leading the charge. In addition to forecasting a global DevOps software market in excess of $5.6 billion by 2021, IDC offered some interesting predictions that should sit well with CA’s DevSecOps ambitions, including: -cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning will become the fastest growing segments of software development by the end of 2018; by 2021, 90% of organizations will be incorporating cognitive/AI and machine learning into new enterprise apps -by 2019, over 70% of routine development-lifecycle tasks will be automated, supported by AI fed from existing data streams, with an agile DevOps pipeline driving and incubating lifecycle and application development intelligence; -by 2021, over 50% of CIOs will have appointed heads of delivery; integrated their dev, PMO, and ops groups; reduced silos; expanded their DevOps practices; and implemented shift-left testing to accelerate innovation; and, -development without integrated security and compliance will fail; progressive orgs have prioritized security due to uptime and compliance concerns, accelerating the need for agility and a curated OSS-dev portfolio. Security-led development will be a priority for 90% of orgs by 2020. 451 Research (together with security software testing...

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What to Expect from Red Hat Summit (Video)

We are just over a week away from Red Hat Summit, the annual show for one of the leaders in commercial open source projects. In the past few years, Red Hat has gone well beyond its namesake Linux distribution, with products in OpenStack, Systems Management and Automation, DevOps, and most notably, containers and container managements. This year’s show is especially interesting, with the rise of container usage, the purchase of CoreOS by Red Hat in January, and continued interest in CloudForms and OpenShift. In this video, I give a quick overview of some key announcements and trends that we might see at Red Hat Summit this year. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Mainframe Renaissance Accelerates
Apr05

Mainframe Renaissance Accelerates

For the better part of 40 years I’ve been updating the mainframe’s obituary, but like Monty Python’s infamous ‘flesh wound’ skit, it has continued to linger on. Now – even with the accelerating skills shortage – it appears that Big Iron is back with a vengeance, gaining more new customers than are moving off the venerable platform, attracted by its brute power, flexibility and security. It seems cloud, mobility and customer empowerment are all better on the mainframe. Mainframe software ISV Compuware has been seeing the growth in the market, and it’s recent survey provided empirical proof, said CEO Chris O’Malley. He told IT Trends & Analysis that everyone who was using “a hope-and-pray strategy that the mainframe would go away” are being disappointed. Not only are organizations “walking away from trying to shift from the platform,” but the mainframe is growing in popularity. “We’re also seeing things like mobile and analytics causing new workloads to be moved to that platform.” This mainframe renaissance is atypical of the IT industry, where vendors are always searching for new, better and different, and dumping commodity hardware. It wasn’t that long ago that rumors surfaced that like its PC, printer and server businesses, Big Blue’s mainframe unit was up for sale. But that was then, and now, Big Iron is once again big. “You remember the mainframe, that platform that supposedly was dead back in the 1980s,” recently asked analyst Rob Enderle, Enderle Group? “Well, once again IBM showcased there is evidently life after death because that puppy grew more than a whopping 70 percent year over year.” Not only is the mainframe alive and kicking, it’s also drawing interest from unexpected quarters. IBM’s “Master the Mainframe” annual contest designed to teach students to code and build new innovations on the mainframe drew almost 17,000 students this year. “A look at the demographics of this year’s event reveals some real eye-openers: 80% of the registrants were new to the program; the average age was 22 – with participants as young as 13 and as old as 68; and 23% of participants were female,” noted analyst Billy Clabby, Clabby Analytics. The Compuware study, conducted by Forrester Consulting, found that 72% of customer-facing applications are completely or very dependent on back-end mainframe workloads, and users are running more of their critical applications on the platform – 57% of enterprises with a mainframe currently run more than half of their business-critical applications on the platform — with that number expected to increase to 64% by 2019. “Before the advent of Linux on the mainframe, the people who bought mainframes primarily were people who already had...

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CA’s Perfect Storm (But For How Long?)
Nov16

CA’s Perfect Storm (But For How Long?)

LAS VEGAS:  This would appear to be the perfect time for CA Technologies, which has gathered its key customers and partners here for CA World ‘17. A growing data deluge, a sweeping digital transformation revolution, a heightening focus on security, and the exploding need for constantly evolving apps are all driving this perfect storm at which CA should be at the epicenter. However, neither a perfect storm, nor an epicenter can be weathered without severe risks, and based on the software giant’s most recent financial results CA’s success is still problematic. On October 25 the company reported FY18 Q2 revenue of $1.034 billion, and while that was up 2% year over year, net income was down 13% and bookings were down 1%. The outlook for the remainder of the fiscal year is approximately 5% increase in revenue to between $4.22-$4.25 billion, and a 5%-8% decrease in earnings per share. While painting an optimistic picture — highlighting the SaaS business growth, total new sales, Enterprise Solutions new sales, and Mainframe new sales “all outperformed the year-over-year decline in the renewal portfolio” — during the analysts’ call following the earnings report, CEO Mike Gregoire also noted “disappointing” sales execution in Q2. “In particular, velocity in sales outside of the renewal cycle of Enterprise Solutions products was short of our expectations.’ Overall, Gregoire said the company was well-positioned for the future. “We are well positioned in great markets, and our solutions are solving real problems for our customers.” CA sees itself as the toolmaker for the DT generation, pushing its modern software factory philosophy. Digital transformation should be an ISV’s dream market: spending on DT technologies will exceed more than $1.2 trillion this year, and continue to grow at almost 18% per year to $2 trillion by 2020, almost 20X the anemic growth forecast for the overall IT market. At last year’s event the company trotted out the its Built To Change paradigm, and reinforced it with the ‘Built to Change Summit’ in June. This week’s theme, No Barriers, is all about marrying CA’s own transformation experience with its products, services and expertise, to help its customers overcome the barriers embodied by DT, as Gregoire stated in his keynote yesterday. “The focus today is on innovating the next big shift for your company,” he said. “That is the number one priority we are focused on – providing you with solutions that will remove the barriers between your ideas and outcomes.” CA is helping a lot of companies to change, and Gregoire called out a few, including FedEx, Netflix and Citi, as well as telling the audience that they will be instrumental in...

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