Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success
Sep28

Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success

Last week Hitachi ($81 billion annual revenues and more than 800 subsidiaries, with products including consumer appliances, electric power generation as well as IT) announced it was combining its former storage/IT business unit Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), together with Pentaho (BI software) and Hitachi Insight Group (IoT products and services), into a new unit focused on the operational technology (OT)/IT/IoT space. The new venture, Hitachi Vantara, also unveiled a number of products, services and partnerships focused on most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including Big Data and analytics, cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. So was this a bold move to combine assets that have a lot more potential upside in a US-based, IoT-focused business, or a desperate attempt to pump new life into stagnating segments? HDS may be the dominant member of the IoT troika, but with only a tiny share of a barely growing enterprise storage market, the grass looks much greener in an IoT market expected to reach between $1.2 to $2 trillion by 2021, with double-digit compound annual growth. The research data varies wildly, but it is certain that IoT is going to be a huge opportunity for the foreseeable future: –73% of executives are either researching or currently launching IoT projects; -manufacturing-based IoT connections grew 84% between 2016 and 2017, followed by energy & utilities (41%), transportation and distribution (40%), smart cities and communities (19%) and healthcare and pharma (11%); -the retail IoT market is forecast to surpass $30 billion by 2024; -the manufacturing IoT market is forecast to surpass $150 billion by 2024; -the IoT platform market (i.e. Vantara’s Lumada) is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16 billion by 2020; and, -project-based IoT services represented the highest percentage of market opportunity in 2016, and will gain nearly one point of market share to 56.7% by 2021, approaching $30.8 billion, with the Americas (52.2%) and EMEA (34.4%) substantially outperforming Asia/Pacific (13.4%) last year. It would appear to be very good news — at least potentially — for Hitachi, because it’s name was nowhere to be found in key players in the Persistence Market Research study. The featured vendors were: IBM, Microsoft, AT&T, Apple, Google, General Electric, Samsung, Comcast, Intel, Cisco Systems, Oracle, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Fujitsu, Qualcomm Technologies, Honeywell International, Accenture PLC, ARM, Amazon Web Services, SAP SE, Zebra Technologies, and Texas Instruments. From Data Storage to Business Outcomes Vantara represents a change in how Hitachi, or at least some of its IT assets, are presented, said analyst George Crump, StorageSwiss. ‘It does not want to compete with Dell and HP for storage deals. It wants to compete with...

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Hitachi Vantara: ‘Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!’

LAS VEGAS: Regardless of whether this is just a repackaging of existing assets, or something that shakes up the operational technology (OT) and IT industries, Hitachi Vantara did make a number of announcements to grease its way onto the IoT center stage. In addition to IoT, its news covered most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. The first two product launches featured Lumada, its IoT platform, and included a number of enhancements, as well as an appliance. Initially unveiled back in May 2016 by Vantara’s predecessor, Hitachi Insight Group, Lumada is a ‘comprehensive, enterprise-grade IoT core platform with an open and adaptable architecture that simplifies IoT solution creation and customization. ‘ Lumada 2.0 is now available in a standalone version and has been updated with a portable architecture so that it can run both on-premises or in the cloud, and to support industrial IoT deployments both at the edge and in the core. Due out later this year, the Hitachi IoT Appliance, powered by Lumada, is a pre-validated plug-and-play solution that enables users to rapidly connect, monitor and extract actionable insights from their business and industrial assets. The company says it can be deployed and production-ready in under an hour. Vantara was also active in the cloud segment, announcing a partnership with VMware and Mesosphere to ‘expand the use cases for private and hybrid cloud with pre-engineered service catalogs and rate card pricing.’ Available through an early customer adoption program, the Hitachi Enterprise Cloud with VMware vRealize 7.3 automates the creation, deployment and management of container hosts and cloud-native applications as a service, across a multi-vendor, multi-cloud infrastructure, while HEC’s new Container Platform provides hybrid cloud resources for DevOps that utilize microservices architecture with a turnkey, end-to-end container as a service environment. Available now, Hitachi Unified Compute Platform (UCP) CI [Converged Infrastructure] is a new family of converged infrastructure systems that feature the company’s Virtual Storage Platform (VSP) storage with Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Combined with the UCP Advisor 2.0 software, due out later this year, they deliver what Hitachi calls ‘a modern, integrated data-centric framework’ that can ‘deploy enterprise applications faster, with improved performance, higher uptime, simplified troubleshooting and enhanced security features’, in addition to providing ‘lower operational costs, reduced complexity and risk, and better utilization of data’. On Day 2 of Hitachi NEXT the company announced a partnership with BT, the large telecom services provider formerly known as British Telecom. Under the terms of the deal, the partners will collaborate on new solutions for industrial and enterprise IoT, with the initial focus on ‘ exploring and designing asset intelligence...

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Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business
Sep14

Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (1859)   Last week Equifax, a supplier of credit information, reported that a recent data breach could affect up to 143 million consumers in the U.S. It’s even worse for businesses: according to Cisco’s 2017 Midyear Cybersecurity Report, only 66% of organizations are investigating security alerts, and businesses are mitigating less than 50% of attacks they know are legitimate. More than 150 years ago author Charles Dickens started off his novel ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ with “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”, and that line is still timely when it comes to cybersecurity and the new and improved Micro Focus. The new company officially debuted on September 1 with the ‘spin-merge’ acquisition of Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s software business valued at $8.8 billion, making it the world’s ‘seventh largest pure-play software company’, with annual revenue of $4.4 billion. Chris Hsu, formerly COO of HPE and EVP and GM of HPE Software, is now CEO of Micro Focus. Under the terms of the deal, HPE shareholders own 50.1% of the new company, which works out to approximately $6.3 billion, which is in addition to the $2.5 billion cash payment that HPE received. The deal involved the ArcSight security and Mercury Interactive application management assets, as well as the late and unlamented Autonomy Corp. plc, which HP acquired in 2011 for $11.1 billion (more than $16 billion for all three acquisitions), but ended up writing off almost $9 billion of the purchase price. According to Securities and Exchange Commission filings, HPE’s software business revenue in the 12 months through Oct. 31, 2016 were $3.17 billion. ITOM (IT Operations Management) comprised 61% of the revenue; Enterprise Security Products (18%); Information Management and Governance (16%); and Big Data Analytics (5%). Revenue for all products broke down to: 28% license, 9% software-as-a-service (SaaS), 50% maintenance, and 13% professional services. On Tuesday the company refreshed its expanded security portfolio, with new and enhanced offerings, including: -ArcSight Data Platform (ADP) 2.2 (GA October) brings native, realtime log parsing, security data enrichment and normalization into the innovative Event Broker for security operations that scales to any data volumes, building the power of ArcSight’s connectors directly into the Event Broker; -a new partnership provides IT and security teams with data that has been enriched for better visibility and customization within powerful search dashboards of Elastic; –ArcSight Investigate 2.0 (GA October) with built-in security analytics displayed in pre-defined dashboards that are powered by Vertica to provide actionable intelligence for front-line analysts; -Change Guardian 5.0...

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The Mainframe Is Dead, Dying… or DT/DevOps-ing?
Jan19

The Mainframe Is Dead, Dying… or DT/DevOps-ing?

For decades pundits and competitors have been writing off the mainframe, AKA Big Iron, and while its market share has been eroded by newer platforms — as befits an industry where ‘what have you done for me lately’ is right up there with ‘Moore’s Law’ as Revealed Truth — it’s still alive and kicking: 55% of enterprise apps need the mainframe; 70% of enterprise transactions touch a mainframe; and, 70-80% of the world’s corporate data resides on a mainframe. However at least some are arguing that despite its age — now in its ‘50s — the venerable platform that IBM powered to success is finding new life with a couple of the current industry darlings, Digital Transformation and DevOps. First, some industry factoids: the latest quarterly server data (3Q16) showed a drop in shipments (-2.6%) and revenues (-5.8%) year over year, with IBM plummeting -33% (to $889 million). However the datacenter systems market is expected to grow 2.6% this year, to $176 billion, which should benefit mainframe sales. According to many, the future does look brighter for the mainframe. When not pointing out HPE’s perceived faults, analyst Rob Enderle (and former IBMer) has covered Big Blue extensively and recently (October) noted that developments like cloud, analytics, Linux and Blockchain are offering new optimism for the embattled platform. ‘Suddenly, mainframes are not only not obsolete, they are cutting edge, go figure. Yep the mainframe is back, with a vengeance.’ Reporting on IBM’s annual year-end recap for the Systems group, analyst Joe Clabby, Clabby Analytics, noted that the mainframe’s future is positive. Big Blue was emphasizing Blockchain and HSBN (the company’s “high security business network”). ‘Blockchain serves as the basis for creating a new way to perform transaction processing, one that features a secure “open ledger” that is shared amongst all concerned parties during the transaction. This new approach streamlines transaction and business processes and enables significantly greater security that traditional approaches.’ IBM claims that it is making solid headway with this offering in the securities, trade, finance, syndicated loans, supply chain, retail banking, public records and digital property management industries. ‘For over 20 years, ever since industry pundits in the mid-1990s forecast the demise of the IBM mainframe, Clabby Analytics has taken the position that there is no other architecture better suited for processing secure transactions (and now in-transaction analytics workloads) than IBM’s z System. ‘Given this position, we see IBM’s new LinuxONE mainframe servers as ideally positioned to support a projected major market move toward Hyperledger and Blockchain transaction processing over the coming years. This movement should greatly escalate the sale of mainframe servers. Long live the mainframe!’ Released...

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CA: Shift Left Up The Value Stream
Dec01

CA: Shift Left Up The Value Stream

“If you went to bed last night as an industrial company, you’re going to wake up this morning as a software and analytics company.” GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt In the late 1980s an analyst said IBM faced two bad choices: it could shoot itself in the foot, make drastic and expensive changes to survive, or it could wait until the market shot it in the head, at which point survival was unlikely. Almost 30 years later, CA Technologies has been grappling with the same dilemma: make drastic and painful changes or hope to survive when the market makes those changes for it. Originally focused exclusively on the mainframe market when it opened its doors in 1976, the company has set its sights on the Digital Transformation segment in general, and the Application Economy in specific. At November’s annual customer and partner event, CA World 2016, it highlighted its new motto — Built To Change — which pretty much says it all about the opportunity/challenge before it (and the rest of us), a world of constant change where the optimal application of speed and agility to new and emerging business opportunities is becoming the norm. While mainframes aren’t disappearing any time soon, they’ve long been replaced by other platforms as the ‘compute’ growth engines, so CA’s focus has had to change with the market. The company’s other core competence, software development, has also been under increasing pressure as the world moves to DevOps and the demand for cheap, fast and secure application development that addresses everything from mainframe to mobile, sensors (IoT) to the cloud. So CA has been remaking itself over the last few years and the new and improved software giant showcased a variety of new and improved offerings last week, including new DevOps capabilities with intelligent analytics and integrations for cloud services and virtual networks, and predictive analytics capabilities with machine learning for the mainframe. The company also reinforced its ‘shift left’ messaging, a term originally applied to moving testing to the left on a timeline, i.e. earlier, in the software development cycle. However, CA is using the term in a broader context. Customer expectations are never met, said CEO Mike Gregoire, they always want more. “We call that shift left.” The new digital world is all about “creative disruption and destruction”, said CA’s Ayman Sayed, President and Chief Product Officer, at last week’s event. The world as we know it is changing: “traditional business models are threatened, fading or obsolete,” and the company’s mission is to help customers win digital transformation, “breaking the barriers between ideas and outcomes.” A big part of the company’s...

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