Keeping Up with Incident Response

A fire department in a large city certainly has a difficult job but its mission is fairly straightforward. When a fire is detected, the fire department dispatches an appropriately sized staff to assess, contain, and put out the fire, clean up, investigate what happened, and prepare themselves for the next blaze. Yup, a pretty simple process when a manageable number of fires are burning but what would happen if there were hundreds or thousands of simultaneous infernos? My guess is that a senior fire chief (and perhaps other participants from local government and law enforcement) would have to make decisions on which blazes to resource and which to ignore. These decisions would certainly be based upon information analysis and best practices but there is still some risk that the disregarded fires would end up being far worse than expected, turn into disasters, and call into question the judgement of all involved. This example is a useful analogue for incident response at large organizations. On any given day, enterprises face a cacophony of security alerts that need further investigation but they tend to lack the skills and resources to look into each one. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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SIEM Market Dynamics in Play

When I started focusing on the security market 14 years ago, the SIEM market was a burgeoning market populated by vendors such as CA, e-Security, Intellitactics, and NetForensics. In the intervening timeframe, the SIEM market has grown, thrived, and changed every few years. SIEM started as a central repository for event correlation for perimeter security devices. It then morphed into a reporting engine for governance and compliance. In a subsequent phase, SIEM became more of a query and log management tool for security analysts. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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OpenText to Buy Dell EMC’s Enterprise Content Division

The plan by OpenText, an Ontario-based player in the Enterprise Information Management (EIM) space, to purchase Dell EMC’s Enterprise Content Division, including Documentum, is an interesting deal for both firms though for substantially different reasons. In the case of OpenText, the deal represents a step forward in strengthening a leadership position in a range of EIM solutions and services. The sale also demonstrates how Dell Technologies is moving forward both strategically and financially after the close of its purchase of EMC. Let’s talk about that. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…Why Enterprises Are Choosing Dell… Over HPE

Pushing hard for competitive advantage is hardly unusual in business. In fact, it’s commonplace for many companies to attempt to advance their own interests by spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) about their competitors’ strategies and efforts. Common or not, some of these exercises go to extremes. A case in point: Ever since Dell announced its plan to buy EMC last October, HPE’s CEO Meg Whitman has tried to dump FUD onto the deal as if she were driving a manure spreader. Whitman decried the size and complexity of Dell’s plan, saying it would result in “chaos” and insinuated that financing the deal would “keep them from better serving their customers.” Whitman also said that Dell is “getting bigger, leveraging up, and mostly doubling down on legacy technology. While our strategy is to get smaller.” In fact, Whitman claimed that HPE’s spin-offs and “spin-sales” of underperforming business units, including PCs, professional services and application software have placed it “two years ahead of the game.” That’s strong stuff so it’s worth taking a look at organizations that literally aren’t buying it. Businesses, including HPE customers, aren’t just ignoring Whitman’s FUD. In many cases, they are actively purchasing solutions from Dell Technologies to replace their HPE data center gear. The following is a profile of one such enterprise that I interviewed to discuss the business and technology challenges it faced, and why it decided to invest in Dell Technologies’ solutions. Please note that the representative I spoke with, a technical lead in the company’s IT organization, asked that its name and location not be disclosed for practical and competitive reasons. I’ve honored that request. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell + EMC – Now the Work (and Fun) Begins

The formal closure of Dell’s purchase of EMC ties a finishing bow around a package effectively sealed weeks ago. Some industry watchers cautioned that the lengthy approval process by China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) could stymie or even derail the plan. However, that seemed unlikely for a number of reasons, especially considering Dell’s years of efforts in the country, including its support and promotion of Chinese manufacturing partners. In any case, the largest acquisition in the history of the IT industry is done, so what happens next? A few final details will be sorted out. EMC investors will receive $24.05 per share in cash, along with a new tracking stock (which will trade on the NYSE under the symbol DVMT) linked to EMC’s interest in VMware; receiving approximately 0.111 shares of DVMT for each EMC share they held. After the close of trading on September 7, Kraft Heinz will replace EMC in the S&P 100, and Charter Communications will replace EMC in the S&P 500. Then the real work begins, along with the fun of integrating and building a new organization from two of the IT industry’s preeminent vendors. Let’s consider that process, along with how the new company will eventually appear. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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