Cisco’s Networking Academy…

Technology companies, largely thanks to the firms that make their money from ad revenue, are increasingly being viewed as villains. Uncaring behemoths that show up in books like Brotopia as bad actors. But there are firms fighting back against this image and related bad practices who believe the future isn’t the world vs. tech firms, but the world enhanced by them. One of the firms that is aggressively trying to showcase how you can...

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Cisco and Collaboration

I’m at C-Scape, Cisco’s big analyst event which is held during Cisco Live, this week. One of the more interesting sessions was by Jonathan Rosenberg who is the VP and CTO of Cisco’s collaboration business. What caught my attention is that he opened with Metcalf’s law, which states that the value of a network is the square of the number of people on the network and he suggested this law also applied to communications tools. The reason...

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Lenovo Wants to Simplify Conference Room Collaboration…

Equipping a conference room used to be really easy. You’d specify a speaker phone for the room, maybe select a couple of white boards and a flip chart, specify a conference table and chairs and that’d be about it. Video conferencing attempted to disrupt this several times, but a lack of compatibility, poor ease of use, and extreme expense tended to keep it from getting to true critical mass. The bigger problem was the systems tended...

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Qualcomm XR1: Finally Making Mixed Reality Viable

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR)—which we now call mixed reality—has had two very serious problems that I think could have been solved had the industry just approached this segment properly. Before we get to the Qualcomm XR1 platform and how it addresses those issues, though, I want to chat about how the industry messed up bringing this technology to market. The VR/AR Screw Up What is often find really annoying is when...

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The FBI’s Accidental Argument for Using Blackberry Phones

This week there was another FBI scandal. This one was on how the FBI massively overinflated the numbers of phones they needed access to in order to “protect the nation.” For some time now, they’ve been arguing that they need to be able to have a “secret key” to breach the encryption on smartphones even though it would put the vast majority of high risk US citizens, like politicians and highly-placed executives, at extreme risk. This...

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