Killing The Magic In Apple

Last decade Apple was largely known for a cadence of hit products. You had the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, and the iPad closing out the decade in 2010. Steve Jobs passed in 2011. From then on, we’ve had the Apple Watch and, most recently, the Apple HomePod. The Apple watch is nowhere near the hit the iPad was and realize that the iPad itself seemed to go into decline shortly after Steve Jobs passed. The HomePod is too early (surveys don’t look great for it at the moment but it is early) into the market but given it is running against the dominant Amazon Echo which does more for about half the price prognoses isn’t very good for this product which, like the watch, broke the model of creating something that Apple could make look like everyone needed one. At the core of this problem I think is a sharp pivot from a CEO who was a product guy and a CEO who is more of a process guy and a change in focus from product/customer, to Margin/Investor particularly large investors. Let me explain because Apple is hardly alone with this. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Apple Makes Huge Mistake At WWDC 2017

I’d tuned into the Apple World Wide Developer’s conference a tad late and missed the opening video but when I went back to check my notes on the keynote I had a WTF moment. Watch the start of the Tim Cook keynote for the show. To save you time it starts with a video of a guy who is brought into what looks like a data center, he is kind of an idiot. He unpacks his stuff and then wants to plug in his new age desktop waterfall and pulls the plug on what looks like a server or network tower in order to do this. When that component goes down it causes a cascade failure for all of the iPhones, Apple Watches, and iPads in the world. This collapse turns the world into a Mad Max future where cars don’t run, there appears to be no power, people are revolting, and everything pretty much sucks. The stated message was that the world depends on apps, but what the film seemed to showcase was that there is single point of complete failure for the entire Apple ecosystem and if it goes down our world collapses with it. Let’s talk about why it is really stupid for Apple to give folks the ideas that the platform is massively vulnerable and this vulnerability could destroy lives. You know I might be able to just stop there… For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Goes to War with Oracle…

We often talk about current rivalries like Google vs. Apple vs. Microsoft, but these pale next to some of the wars that have gone back decades. Granted the Sun vs. IBM war is long over and—surprisingly—IBM won. In fact, IBM has only lost one big battle historically, and that was against software company Microsoft. But another war that likely sets the record for length and resources is the one between IBM and Oracle—which many of us largely forgot about until recently. Well, apparently, IBM didn’t forget and I’m sure Oracle has been reminded of this fight because IBM just went after Oracle with guns blazing and it is an impressive effort. I’ve received feedback from some of the customers that have recently migrated from Oracle’s offerings to IBM and they appear to be singing IBM’s praises. For me, this is interesting because one of the frustrations I had when I worked at IBM was that IBM seemed to be afraid to take the gloves off, and ended up being the punching bag more often than not. As an employee working for a firm that refused to take the fight to a competitor wasn’t exactly a morale booster. So, it is great to see the firm finally take the gloves off with Oracle. Let’s talk about that this week. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How To Prevent VR from Becoming the Next 3D

There is a common recurring problem, and set of mistakes, in the technology market. Basically, the industry gets excited about a new technology but either loses track of—or never finds—a customer for it. It spends billions in marketing and development only to find that there is no one that wants to actually buy the thing. Color TV actually started out this way, laser discs, the first couple iterations of the smarthome, quadraphonic technology, the first Windows Tablets, hoverboards, and positional cameras on game consoles—all at one time drifted into or were killed by this nasty practice, taking with them the jobs of an impressive number of people. Right now, virtual reality (VR) technology is on this same path largely because of a common mistake, a failure to first define what a broad market acceptable solution would be before presenting it as a broad market product. Now I don’t think VR has to fail. There is a path to success and color TVs, and the iPod showcase how to do this while 3D TV recently showcased how not to do it. Let’s talk about how to turn VR into a success, because recent studies indicate that is not the path it is on. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Jaguar, the Hyperconverged Company and…

At Dell EMC World last week, one of the most interesting conversations I had was with Jaguar’s CIO, Simon Bolton, who is driving what has been an incredibly successful IT effort at Jaguar. In the company’s new “Green Field” plants, Bolton championed what used to be called Dell’s VCE platform with nearly unbelievable result in terms of productivity and uptime. This was fascinating to me for several reasons; 1) it was a showcase for the power of the hyperconverged concept, 2) I own two Jaguars, and, 3) I’ve been trying (so far unsuccessfully) to order the new Jaguar iPace. Oh, and, 4) when I was younger, for a time, I was a Jaguar mechanic. So, this was a chance to blend my car hobby with my passion for the concept of how to do IT successfully. But I also came around to the idea of IT Entropy because, during the event, I found out there were some unhappy Dell Hyperconverged customers and the cause was something I’m calling IT Entropy, which will likely hurt Jaguar’s effort to convert old plants to this new concept. Let me explain. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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