Is Dell Right? Was The MacBook Air Stupid?

Steve Jobs was a natural manipulator, so much so that folks often referred to him as having his own Reality Distortion Field. This allowed him to say often even contradict himself and get away with it. For instance he once said that video on an iPod was stupid and that no one would ever adapt a tablet because it lacked a keyboard (there is a list of his 6 most impressive false statements here). One effort that really screwed up the PC market for a while was his forced march to the ultimate thin Notebook Computer the MacBook Air. It was a lust worthy device, but the tradeoffs were painful, so much so that Lenovo made fun of it in this video. Why The MacBook Air Sort Of Sucked Now I’m sure a lot of folks legitimately liked the MacBook Air, but I’ve known several that quickly learned they couldn’t live with it. It was simply the wrong product for them and yet they were convinced by some impressive marketing that it was a “Magical” product only to find it was instead a bad buy. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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AMD Jumps Past Intel with…

I’ve never seen a company so cripple itself as I have with Intel recently. From OEM support, to marketing, to just good governance—Intel appears to have all but abandoned the PC market even though companies like HP (speaking of HP, they are doing some really interesting things of late) are surging in it. But that has left a huge opportunity for AMD to fill the gap, and this week they announced their second-generation Ryzen Processors. For once however the most interesting things about this release aren’t the processors, but the software and features that AMD wrapped around them. It is this unique value add that I think makes for a very compelling reason to go AMD this cycle, well that and the fact Intel got caught screwing its investors, customers, employees, and country. Let’s talk Second-Generation Ryzen this week: To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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HP Defines Value of Doing Well By Doing Good

This week I was at HP’s Accelerate Executive Forum in Las Vegas. This is basically an HP Channel event and HP LOVES its channel. This is refreshing because, over the years, I’ve been brought in on a number of channel problems and they generally come down to the firm either abusing or ignoring their channel even though that channel accounts for more income than they can afford to lose. Well, at this event, the number of times HP reached out to their channel, highlighted that arrogance was a bigger concern than competitors, and drove home the point (right out of Dion Weisler, their CEO’s, mouth) that HP is driven by their channel was record breaking. But one other thing struck me. In a world where we are questioning whether our technology companies and CEOs are acting against us, HP also stood out as a company with heart doing things aggressively to make the world a better place. Let’s take a break from our concerns about Facebook and Google and talk about another company that is doing well by doing good. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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NVIDIA GTC: Recreating…

I’m at NVIDIA’s GTC conference this week and I’ll be damned if their CEO Jen-Hsun Huang didn’t replicate one of the coolest technologies in the Black Panther movie. No, it wasn’t the Vibranium Armor, though that’d been really cool too, no it was the VR remote driving car technology. You recall the scene where the Black Panther’s sister, off in Wakanda, was able to take over remotely a Lexus driving it from a special remote capsule which made it feel like she was actually in the remote car? Well Jen-Hsun showed that in NVIDIA’s lab they have created one of these things. They also showcased the car render around the driver and the driver being able to remotely drive the car. What was kind of interesting was the car that was rendered was a Lexus, and the car that was driven was a Ford. Kind of implies one of the ways to save money in the future would be to buy a cheap car but have in rendered as an expensive car. Ford would be OK with that, Lexus not so much. But I think this suggests some really interesting things in our future. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Think 2018 – IBM’s Power9 System…

I’m at IBM’s huge Think event this week and, holy crap, there are a lot of IT folks here. It continues to amaze me how much IBM has changed over the years and yet remained the same. The changes are tied to platforms that are designed to be deployed in the cloud using open platforms, and the things that have remained the same is an almost rabid focus on the needs of its customers. How this last is demonstrated is an unmatched ability to get big recognized customers on stage behind their global brands to advocate for IBM. These events are often very similar to a religious experience given the level and quality of customer testimony. One of the more interesting events was the Power9 event. What makes this interesting is Power started out along with a number of other architectures competing with X86 and Intel but while the vast majority of other alternatives failed, IBM saved Power by doing something un-IBM like. They opened it up and Open Power has been successful thanks to that. Interestingly, Oracle, this week who copied IBM’s old lock in strategy missed their financial expectations while IBM has been doing impressively well. This goes back to IBM’s core culture professed by its most iconic CEO Thomas Watson Jr. who passed down to his successors one preeminent rule, “be willing to change anything but what you are”. IBM remains focused on meeting customer needs but everything else has largely changed and Power9 is representative of that change. Let’s talk about some of those changes. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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