Oracle Removes the Line Between Cloud & On-premises Storage

So Oracle just announced the new 8.7 version of the OS that powers its ZFS storage systems; I try to avoid writing about specific product news too often in this blog because a) you can get product news elsewhere and b) product news is usually just iterative and rarely does it contain that much deeper industry insight. But stick with me here, as this does get way more interesting than the move from version 8.6 to version 8.7 might suggest. To give a “you are here” starting point, the ZFS platform has been improving for years now and is a storage system to be reckoned with – its lickety-spit speed just got further enhanced with added flash pools and its tight integration with all-things-Oracle makes databases and apps verily sing. While the meatier part of the news is pretty well conveyed in the new moniker Oracle is using for its offering – “Cloud Converged Storage” – even that doesn’t quite do justice to the required-data-revolution-made-manifest that is represented here. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

What Sits on the Public Cloud Always & Forever? (Video)

There’s an assumption in this blog post that I should start with – it is simply that I am assuming a time horizon in which we haven’t completely reinvented IT and in which there is still both an on-premises component (or use cases) and a public cloud component (or use cases). So, assumption accepted, what is it that will go on the public cloud for the imaginable future; sure, we are flexing that list a little as the pros and cons of both on-premises and cloud ebb and flow somewhat – based sometimes on technological shifts and/or variations based upon experience. But what “stuff” sits out on the cloud come-what-may? I take a swing at an answer in this video. I would love to know what you think…. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

Security Analytics and Operations at RSA

So far, I’ve written two blogs about my expectations for the upcoming RSA Security Conference next week. The first blog was about my outlook for endpoint security while the second focused on network security. I am also in the middle of a big research project on security analytics and operations right now and believe that many independent technologies will be integrated into a comprehensive architecture that ESG calls SOAPA (i.e., security operations and analytics platform architecture). Here’s another blog where I define the SOAPA architecture and all the consolidating piece parts. With SOAPA in mind, here’s what I’m expecting to see at RSA: To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

RSA Conference Topic: Endpoint Security

As the calendar shifts from January to February, cybersecurity professionals are gearing up for the RSA Security Conference in a few short weeks. Remarkably, the management team is expecting more than 50,000 attendees this year! So, what can we expect from RSA 2017? Well, cybersecurity is being driven by dangerous threats, digital transformation, and the need for massive scalability. This means innovation and change in just about every aspect of cybersecurity technology so I plan on writing a few blogs about my expectations for the RSA Conference. I’ll start with this one about endpoint security. To be clear, endpoint security should no longer be defined as antivirus software. No disrespect to tried-and-true AV, but endpoint security now spans a continuum that includes advanced prevention technologies, endpoint security controls, and advanced detection/response tools. My colleague Doug Cahill and I are currently tracking more than 50 endpoint security vendors, demonstrating just how much activity there is today. Here’s a brief list of some endpoint security activities I anticipate at RSA: To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

Dell EMC & VMware… Multiple Manifestations of SDS

Recently my colleagues and I were embroiled in an intricate discussion with some of the Dell EMC/VMware team about the status, applicability, and positioning of the various SDS manifestations that behemoth now offers. And suddenly I had one of those “the penny dropped” moments…not of the “epiphany/eureka” type, but more of the “yeah, I knew that but all-too-often overlook it” type. And one more thing before I say what it was: it’s also somewhat ironic when you consider the tangled semantic machinations we have all gone through as an industry to actually define software-defined storage that we have – dropping penny time – overlooked the fact that it is an approach (or concept), and not a specific thing (or singular manifestation). Like many such moments, its outcome is really rather obvious and simple….having storage functionality as software not only allows, but one might say demands, different implementations and deployments in order to address different needs – be they of situation, scale, workloads, attitudes, or indeed as any or all of these change over time. While that’s great for IT users (as, with SDS choices, they are more likely by definition to be able to tune a tool to what they need), it can be something of a challenge for IT vendors, since they now have to provide inter-product positioning and applicability advice. Although, frankly, it turns out this is not a challenge for many vendors or to much extent……for the simple reason that very few vendors actually offer a choice when it comes to SDS! To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More