Enterprise[s]… Establishing a “Cybersecurity Cavalry”

Based upon numerous discussions I’ve had with CISOs, the cybersecurity cavalry [highly-skilled and well-armed troops that establish security outposts to encounter adversaries out on the frontier] isn’t a passing fad but rather a major organizational shift that is gaining momentum. Indeed, large organizations are rapidly adding headcount and increasing budgets for this group. I’ve also seen financial services, defense contractors, and retail organizations giving CISOs the cybersecurity equivalent of eminent domain, allowing them to commandeer IT segments, sound alarm bells, and establish active network policy enforcement actions to improve threat response, even if these actions may temporarily disrupt business operations. This type of authority was unheard of in the past. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Cisco, FireEye Announcements: A Microcosm of the …

The Cisco and FireEye announcements are a microcosm of what’s happening in cybersecurity. Large organizations are abandoning individual point tools in favor of integrated cybersecurity technology architectures – exactly why Cisco bought Sourcefire and is now bringing the best of both companies together. Aside from technology alone, CISOs also need to supplement internal infosec resources with the right skills. FireEye is now addressing this. These trends are not a secret – other vendors including HP, IBM, RSA, and Symantec have their own plans for integrated security technology architecture and managed/professional services. This may be the market direction but it’s important to note that the move toward integrated security architecture and managed services represents a major cybersecurity transition for enterprise organizations. Vendors who can guide customers through this evolution with the right project plans, reference architectures, and industry-specific implementation guidelines will put themselves in the best position. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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…Security Professionals Speak Out on SDN Use Cases…

At this week’s VMworld shin dig in San Francisco, many networking and security vendors will crow about software-defined security and software use cases for SDN. Some of this rhetoric will be nothing more than industry hype while other banter may prove to be extremely useful in the near future. Yes, there are many interesting ways that SDN could work to enhance network security. That said, which SDN/network security use cases are really compelling and which could be considered second-tier? ESG research asked this specific question to security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees) as part of a recent ESG research report, Network Security Trends in the Era of Cloud and Mobile Computing. Here are the top 5 SDN use cases for network security: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Anticipating Black Hat

RSA 2014 seems like ancient history and the 2015 event isn’t until next April. No worries, however, the industry is set to gather in the Las Vegas heat next [THIS] week for cocktails, sushi bars, and oh yeah – Black Hat. Now Black Hat is an interesting blend of constituents consisting of government gumshoes, Sand Hill Rd. Merlot drinking VCs, cybersecurity business wonks, “beautiful mind” academics, and tattooed hackers – my kind of crowd! As such, we aren’t likely to hear much about NIST frameworks, GRC, or CISO strategies. Alternatively, I am looking forward to deep discussions on: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Big Switch Networks Heats Up SDN Arms Race With Cloud Fabric
Jul22

Big Switch Networks Heats Up SDN Arms Race With Cloud Fabric

Just over a $1 trillion will be spent on networking hardware and software over the next 5 years, and both vendors – with the possible exception of Cisco – and customers are hoping that Software Defined Networking (SDN) and BFF Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) will capture a growing piece of that money. Big Switch Networks, which started down the SDN path in late 2009, and was working with its originator, Stanford University, 6 months before it opened its doors, is announcing Big Cloud Fabric, which is available in beta, and will be GA later this quarter, as well as Big Tap 4.0, and is expanding its partner ecosystem. And if that isn’t enough, Co-founder and President Kyle Forster told IT Trends & Analysis that his company will be formally accepted into the Open Compute Project in Q3. Forecasts for SDN are all over the map, but a recent Infonetics Research survey of the major service providers that account for 51% of worldwide telecom capex, 29% are currently implementing SDNs, and 52% plan to evaluate SDNs by the end of 2014, and nearly every operator plans to deploy SDN (97%) or NFV (93%) in some aspect of their network at some point. Yesterday Research and Markets reported that the global SDN market is estimated to grow from $290 million in 2014 to $3.67 billion by 2019, a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 66.1%. Last week SNS Research announced that NFV and SDN investments on the Radio Access Network (RAN) segment alone will account for over $5 billion by 2020. So it’s no surprise that Big Switch, along with virtually every other hardware, software, networking and wannabe-superstar-startup is jumping on the SDN bandwagon. The company says that building on the success of its Big Tap monitoring fabric, Big Cloud Fabric – ‘the industry’s first and only data center switching fabric that combines the operational advantages of SDN software with the economics of bare metal switch hardware’ – is the next logical step for network architects embracing hyperscale design. Making the leap to new hyperscale SDN solutions can be challenging for organizations with legacy infrastructure, said Brian Marshall, analyst, ISI Group, in a prepared statement. “However,. Big Tap offers a simple, high-value entry point for customers to warm up to SDN and get comfortable. Now Big Cloud Fabric at the core can help mitigate risk for customers and enable a seamless transition to SDN.” Forster, who spent many years at Microsoft and Cisco prior to starting Big Switch, said his company has been inspired by hyper-scale data centers – i.e. Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Amazon – that have outpaced the vendors...

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