Think Economics, Not Features, When Evaluating Big Data Value

Traditional enterprise data warehouse solutions helped to open the eyes of many organizations to the value of their data. Although these are significant systems, organizations quickly learned to monetize the actionable insight extracted from these systems, which led the rampant growth of the industry. Big data did not get big just from data growth. It got big because of its potential value, opportunities, and savings. The more cost-efficiently you can capture a lot of data, plus the number of ways you can analyze it, equals the more worthwhile all that data could become. Value is results divided by costs. These (pseudo-)equations of big data value now extend not only to the disruptive power of transformative technologies like Hadoop, but also to increasingly popular cloud services for databases and data warehouses. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Everyone And Their Brother But Intel…

It is not often a market moves against some of the dominant players.  In a surprisingly secret and surprise move many of the most powerful companies in technology have formed a consortium to change the market dynamic for servers. In an early morning announcement (as in I’m still asleep) they surprised the market with a massive surprise move that likely shocked those that aren’t part of this consortium.  Effectively they are moving away from PCIe, the current industry standard, to something that is both more open and vastly more powerful. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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OpenCAPI Consortium… Fuel System Innovation

As my colleagues Rob Enderle and Roger Kay discuss in this Pund-IT Review, the new OpenCAPI Consortium announced last week aims to develop new interconnect solutions that will improve server performance by as much as 10X over currently available systems. That’s impressive in eye-opening ways but even more so is OpenCAPI’s roster of founding members – AMD, Dell EMC, Google, HPE, IBM, Mellanox, Micron, NVIDIA and Xilinx – many of which are forcefully direct competitors. The fact that these companies have agreed to lay down their swords, at least for a while, and contribute their plowshare energies and imaginations to the Consortium makes OpenCAPI one of the more unusual collaborations to come down the pike in some time. Rob and Roger did a great job covering the technological elements of OpenCAPI and its potential marketplace impacts, especially on Intel, which was noticeably absent from the Consortium (as was Oracle). So I’d like to look a bit further afield and consider how/where OpenCAPI fits into the larger scheme of IT industry progress, and whether it and other open standards and open development efforts offer viable alternatives to traditional methodologies. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Google organizes hardware business for growth

With PC sales on the decline, Intel is eliminating thousands of jobs while Apple and IBM are doing their best to feed the enterprise appetite for mobile apps and devices. Meanwhile, Google recognizes how workstyles are rapidly changing and is regrouping its hardware business units to potentially capitalize on innovative business trends that are altering employee behavior and the way end-users connect, interact, and consume applications. To read the complete article, CLICK ON AUTHOR’S...

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Cloud Computing Drives a New Era in IT Business

Cloud computing represents a shift in enterprise IT. It affects how IT resources and applications are created, purchased, and deployed. Colloquially known as The Cloud, this paradigm of computing has also shifted the business model of the IT industry. It has empowered end-users to seek out their own IT resources, especially applications, fundamentally changing the balance of power when purchasing computing resources. There are three areas of the IT landscape that are affected by the move to the Cloud. They are: Applications, which have seen barriers to creating, deploying, and buying applications disappear for both lines of business and IT purchasers as well as developers. Infrastructure, reducing the need for on-premises data centers while promising infinite scalability Channel partners who are experiencing major changes to how they provide value to customers now that installation and distribution has become more self-service and purchases are made via subscriptions and not on-premises licenses. For more information*, email: info@neuralytix.com *Caveat Emptor: the report retails for...

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