Apps Go Better with AI – IBM, Apple and Coca-Cola

One of the most profound corporate IT shifts during the past decade is in developers’ roles as agents of business and technological change. That began with the critical positions developers took in cloud computing and bring your own device (BYOD) adoption. The process accelerated as organizations leveraged their developers to shift focus from massive, monolithic business applications to quickly created, continually evolving apps and mobile services. As a result, how and how well businesses support developers and their communities have become important points that can eventually impact a company’s market position and ability to compete. While there’s no single, unchanging answer, how vendors work and work together to facilitate developers’ efforts is an important issue to track. The latest evolution of the four-year-old partnership between IBM and Apple certainly qualifies in that regard. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…IBM Leads Google In Quantum Computing

Like any major breakthrough in technology it is as important who makes the breakthrough as what the breakthrough was. If Germany or Japan had figured out how to harness Nuclear energy first we’d likely be living in a far different and far less attractive world today. Currently there is a lot of buzz surrounding Google’s seeming breakthrough in Quantum computing but, thankfully, these advancements are on paper and not near reality. IBM, on the other hand, has already deployed their IBM Q-Experience and moved beyond paper accomplishments and currently has 76K people working on 5-qubit and 16-qubit quantum computers in the cloud. So, during the time Google was creating their concept for what their Quantum solution will be IBM’s solution has executed more than 2.8M actual experiments, 60+ related research papers, and been used by a 12 Fortune 500 companies. While it is always fun to see one company (Google) claim leadership when they haven’t even yet fielded a solution over another company that has. In this instance, given what Quantum computing means to the world, we should be incredibly thankful that, contrary to what the Google news implies, IBM has a massive lead. Let me explain. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Think Economics, Not Features, When Evaluating Big Data Value

Traditional enterprise data warehouse solutions helped to open the eyes of many organizations to the value of their data. Although these are significant systems, organizations quickly learned to monetize the actionable insight extracted from these systems, which led the rampant growth of the industry. Big data did not get big just from data growth. It got big because of its potential value, opportunities, and savings. The more cost-efficiently you can capture a lot of data, plus the number of ways you can analyze it, equals the more worthwhile all that data could become. Value is results divided by costs. These (pseudo-)equations of big data value now extend not only to the disruptive power of transformative technologies like Hadoop, but also to increasingly popular cloud services for databases and data warehouses. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Everyone And Their Brother But Intel…

It is not often a market moves against some of the dominant players.  In a surprisingly secret and surprise move many of the most powerful companies in technology have formed a consortium to change the market dynamic for servers. In an early morning announcement (as in I’m still asleep) they surprised the market with a massive surprise move that likely shocked those that aren’t part of this consortium.  Effectively they are moving away from PCIe, the current industry standard, to something that is both more open and vastly more powerful. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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OpenCAPI Consortium… Fuel System Innovation

As my colleagues Rob Enderle and Roger Kay discuss in this Pund-IT Review, the new OpenCAPI Consortium announced last week aims to develop new interconnect solutions that will improve server performance by as much as 10X over currently available systems. That’s impressive in eye-opening ways but even more so is OpenCAPI’s roster of founding members – AMD, Dell EMC, Google, HPE, IBM, Mellanox, Micron, NVIDIA and Xilinx – many of which are forcefully direct competitors. The fact that these companies have agreed to lay down their swords, at least for a while, and contribute their plowshare energies and imaginations to the Consortium makes OpenCAPI one of the more unusual collaborations to come down the pike in some time. Rob and Roger did a great job covering the technological elements of OpenCAPI and its potential marketplace impacts, especially on Intel, which was noticeably absent from the Consortium (as was Oracle). So I’d like to look a bit further afield and consider how/where OpenCAPI fits into the larger scheme of IT industry progress, and whether it and other open standards and open development efforts offer viable alternatives to traditional methodologies. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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