HP – Parsed and Future

In ESG’s last storage trends research, one of the questions posed was this: “In general, what would you consider to be the most important criteria to your organization when it comes to selecting a storage vendor/solution?” The number one response (each respondent could check five criteria) was “Total cost of ownership” for 65% of respondents, followed by “Service and support” at 53%. You have to look a long way down the criteria list to get to things like “Existing relationship with vendor” (22%) and “size/financial stability of vendor” (just 15%). In other words, product, value, and service matter a lot….the business card and scale of the vendor much less so. A split HP is no real guarantee of more future success in the storage arena (where it is/was trucking along pretty well), whereas executing against its existing strategy and product roadmap is. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Dell Goes Full Steam Ahead on Software-Defined Storage

The relationship of software and hardware is intricate and complex. Software creates the intelligence that enables hardware to deliver to its full potential. Both are critical, but the focus in systems today tends to be on the software. Hence software-defined solutions are receiving a lot of attention and software-defined storage is part of that broader movement. Dell is not only abstracting the traditional storage management software from the storage hardware, but is also magnifying the ability of software to perform with greater functionality at all levels. Thus, its SDS architecture is additive and can yield not only cost benefits, but also beneficial functionalities, such as automated provisioning to improve service to end users. Dell thus has a vision that spans the storage view from the small world where the company is very comfortable to the Web-scale world where economics with which Dell is very familiar play a key role. Dell uses SDS as an important thrust in maintaining a leadership position in the storage world and has thus used this strategy to achieve considerable success. For more information, EMAIL davidhill@mesabigroup.com NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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ITSM Vendor Cherwell Adds Android To Its SaaS Portfolio
May02

ITSM Vendor Cherwell Adds Android To Its SaaS Portfolio

Most of the commodity IT market – PCs, tablets, servers and storage – have taken a beating, if not in unit shipments, then in revenues and/or margins. While not immune to either the market variations or increasing competition, the smartphone numbers continue to surge, and IT Service Management software vendor Cherwell Software is extending its reach into this segment with Cherwell Mobile for Android. Cherwell has been in this market since 2004, and recording its first non-beta sale in 2007, said Matt Neigh, Director of EMEA Sales. It started primarily with Blackberry, and then added iPhone, but the growing popularity of Android, especially in universities, its biggest vertical market, caught its attention. More and more customers were asking for Android, and it boiled down to anywhere, any time access, he said. “In today’s world people are operating in whatever mode makes the most sense to them.” Different segments have different needs, said Neigh, with admin primarily using desktops and IT a mix of everything. “We live in the days when people want to believe that they have a choice in the device that they access.” So adding Android provides more choice, enabling technicians to deal with the data in a way that makes the most sense to them. “We’re really giving people choices…they’ve become accustomed to that… (and we) believe it’s the same in IT.” Another benefit is dealing with the pace of events, when things happen very quickly. “Your C-level and E-level people have to make decisions in near-real time. Your mobile device really becomes your business GPS.” Finally, there is the customer experience (CX) dynamic, said Neigh. “I believe IT is feeling pressure to provide an incredible customer experience but the challenge they face is they have less resources.” According to the latest numbers from IDC, the smartphone market grew an impressive 28.6% year over year in the first quarter of 2014. Vendors shipped 281.5 million smartphones, which was actually down slightly (-2.8%) from the 289.6 million units shipped in 4Q13. Smartphones accounted for 62.7% of all mobile phone shipments in 1Q14, up from the 50.7% of all mobile phone shipments in 1Q13. IDC expects total smartphone shipment volumes to reach 1.2 billion units in 2014, up 19.3% YoY, which indicates even this market has its limits, following the 39.2% growth seen in 2013. Last year Android was the OS for 78.6% of smartphone shipments, followed by iOS (15.2%, Microsoft (3.3%) and Blackberry (1.9%). This year it is forecast to inch up to 78.9% share, and eventually (2018) will be humbled to only 76% of the market. Smartphone growth is far exceeding the pace of the ITSM market,...

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Video Blog: What Does HP Stand For These Days?

Analyst events (i.e. HP’s event earlier this month) are about many things – strategy, product details, tactics, competitive actions, user stories, and corporate measurement statistics, just to give a few examples. Those are some of the factual aspects….but there’s also another side to things which is very important. Big events such as this are also about setting a tone, and communicating an attitude. Looked at in this perspective the HP event this month was a noticeable success. From a somewhat deliberate yet occasionally dour emphasis a few years ago (no complaints, just an observation) the demeanor and emotion in the “big tent” sessions has shifted, just as much as the private hallway conversations. Take a look at what ESG analysts (Terri McClure, Jason Buffington, Mark Bowker and me) had to say at the event: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Microsoft Continues to Take Great Strides Forward

Microsoft continues to take great strides forward with its cloud strategy, to the point where success has it charging forth at almost record pace. One thing I have learned, in my years working in IT, is that when Microsoft sets its mind on doing something, it is a pretty safe bet that it will succeed in pretty much whatever it puts its collective minds and resources behind. The cloud is just another example of that success. After getting a late start in the virtualization and cloud space, Microsoft finally seems to be seeing strong momentum for the Windows Azure cloud services. Microsoft Azure was formally launched in February 2010. Now, as we approach Azure’s fourth birthday, Microsoft can see itself as a major player in the competition with AWS, Rackspace, IBM, and VMware for what IDC says will be a $107 billion dollar market by the year 2017. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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