IBM’s Master the Mainframe Contest…

IBM has been running “Master the Mainframe,” an annual contest designed to teach students to code and build new innovations on the mainframe, since 2005. This year almost 17,000 students joined the competition, driven by a desire to experiment with a brand-new technology to them (a mainframe), as well as the non-threatening, no-experience-required environment where a student can develop a skill in a teachable, virtual environment. A look at the demographics of this year’s event reveals some real eye-openers: -80 percent of the registrants were new to the program; -The average age was 22 -with participants as young as 13 and as old as 68; also, -23 percent of participants were female. The 80 percent number is notable because it reflects high interest in the mainframe and its revitalization. The average age is interesting because even 22 year-olds (or thereabouts – millennials…) want to experiment with the big machines: mainframes.  But the 23 percent number is equally compelling – females, who usually do not pursue careers in technology, made up almost a quarter of the registrants. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Apps Go Better with AI – IBM, Apple and Coca-Cola

One of the most profound corporate IT shifts during the past decade is in developers’ roles as agents of business and technological change. That began with the critical positions developers took in cloud computing and bring your own device (BYOD) adoption. The process accelerated as organizations leveraged their developers to shift focus from massive, monolithic business applications to quickly created, continually evolving apps and mobile services. As a result, how and how well businesses support developers and their communities have become important points that can eventually impact a company’s market position and ability to compete. While there’s no single, unchanging answer, how vendors work and work together to facilitate developers’ efforts is an important issue to track. The latest evolution of the four-year-old partnership between IBM and Apple certainly qualifies in that regard. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…IBM Leads Google In Quantum Computing

Like any major breakthrough in technology it is as important who makes the breakthrough as what the breakthrough was. If Germany or Japan had figured out how to harness Nuclear energy first we’d likely be living in a far different and far less attractive world today. Currently there is a lot of buzz surrounding Google’s seeming breakthrough in Quantum computing but, thankfully, these advancements are on paper and not near reality. IBM, on the other hand, has already deployed their IBM Q-Experience and moved beyond paper accomplishments and currently has 76K people working on 5-qubit and 16-qubit quantum computers in the cloud. So, during the time Google was creating their concept for what their Quantum solution will be IBM’s solution has executed more than 2.8M actual experiments, 60+ related research papers, and been used by a 12 Fortune 500 companies. While it is always fun to see one company (Google) claim leadership when they haven’t even yet fielded a solution over another company that has. In this instance, given what Quantum computing means to the world, we should be incredibly thankful that, contrary to what the Google news implies, IBM has a massive lead. Let me explain. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Storage Hits the Ground Running in 2018

On February 20, 2018, IBM announced enhancements and new solutions in its storage portfolio designed to ease customer’s adoption of data-driven, multi-cloud architectures including IBM Cloud, AWS, Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure and others. Businesses continue to struggle to modernize traditional workloads (VMware, Oracle etc.), adopt next generation applications (Spark, Hadoop), and deploy development tools such as application refactoring (Docker, Kubernetes). In response, IBM is providing a broad range of software defined storage solutions to make this transition smoother, more efficient and cost effective. IBM’s flexibility also continues to be a differentiator, with support for multiple cloud architectures, an impressive number (> 440) of storage arrays from multiple vendors, and a wide variety of deployment/pricing models. Customers are responding very well to IBM’s strategy. The company enters 2018 with four strong quarters of revenue growth in 2017. With a focus on higher-value solutions, including software defined storage, all-Flash and modern data protection, those product areas dominate IBM’s storage business. This latest announcement includes new offerings and enhancements across the company’s entire portfolio. However, in this review Clabby Analytics will highlight new offerings in modern data protection (Spectrum Protect & Spectrum Protect Plus) and network-attached storage (Spectrum NAS). We believe that these products, in particular, fill existing gaps in IBM’s product line and provide more feature-rich, scalable and easy-to-use solutions for small and mid-size businesses. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM’s Strong Commitment to the NVMe Storage Revolution

IBM’s recent storage announcement covered a number of new and enhanced solutions across IBM’s Storage software and Storage systems portfolio, but for simplicity’s sake, my focus today is the significant support the company is throwing behind the revolution inspired by NVMe (nonvolatile memory express Note that the business storage market has changed dramatically in recent years with revolutions sparked by software-defined storage technologies and flash-based storage hardware, in both of which IBM has been a leader. To those two we can now add a storage connectivity revolution or NVMe. Although this revolution could be considered separate, the primary benefit is to increase the performance of flash storage (not hard disk storage). Therefore, it can also be considered a subset of the flash storage revolution. As it has demonstrated in past such events, IBM has a well-articulated strategy that includes necessary planning and R&D investments to deliver NVMe as a part of its storage environment in a reasonable, achievable time frame. However, before we see what the company is doing we need to understand the technology and why it is important. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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