CA Wants To Be The One (DevSecOps) Throat To Choke
Nov30

CA Wants To Be The One (DevSecOps) Throat To Choke

Whether it’s via a perfect storm, product onslaught or the ‘disrupt or be disrupted’ times, CA Technologies appears to be making steady, if slow, progress from its mainframe roots to the app-fueled digital transformation world where trust, AKA cybersecurity, is essential. Changing a $4-billion company is proving challenging, especially when you consider that the bulk of your business is tied up with a mainframe environment synonymous with slow and steady, as befits the platform that holds between 70-80% of corporate data and affects 70% of enterprise transactions. The software developer may be pushing the ‘software factory’ theme together with fast and agile DevOps, or the newer handle, DevSecOps, but that doesn’t mean it’s customers are comfortable with rapid changes. Not that they have much choice: only 12% of the Fortune 500 survived the period between 1955 and 2016, and up to 50% of the S&P 500 ranks are expected to be replaced over the next 10 years. So disruption is the name of the game, and CA is doing its best to change its spots and become the essential go-to partner for fast and agile DevSecOps where ‘everyone is responsible for security with the goal of safely distributing security decisions at speed and scale to those who hold the highest level of context without sacrificing the safety required.’ That’s a mouthful, but the stakes are mind-boggling, with the potential to take CA’s total addressable market from mainframe billions to DT/DevSecOps trillions. “The ability to manage change, respond to new inputs or insights and pivot has never been more important,” said CA Technologies CEO Mike Gregoire in his opening keynote . “Our entire portfolio is designed around the pillars of the Modern Software Factory to increase the velocity, security and performance of the solutions and the apps that are critical to our customers’ businesses.” He said the company is on a “deliberate journey”, balancing creation and execution and morphing from a solutions company to one that is focused on “accelerating business values.” Operational efficiency isn’t enough, Gregoire added. “First among the tools to confront these challenges is your Modern Software Factory. It ensures that your company is built to change and can adapt to an accelerating digital world.” We may be app-driven, but without security, you’re looking at a world of pain. With DevOps, CA helped break down the barriers between development and operations but “we don’t think about security,” said Gregoire in a media scrum following his keynote. The application is the weakest link in your chain, he said, so you need security involved right from the start, with the coder. However, rather than best-of-breed standalone tools, customers are...

Read More

CA: Connecting the DoTs

To help address the emerging multi-trillion-dollar app-driven digital transformation business phenomenon, CA Technologies made more than 20 new and enhanced product announcements at CA World ‘17. That might seem like a lot, but not when you consider that even after decades of consolidating and rationalizing its software portfolio, the ISV still lists 192 separate products on its website (courtesy of the approximately 70 companies acquired since opening its doors as Computer Associates back in 1976). While its efforts to expand the non-mainframe portion of its business — 65% of total revenues last quarter — seem to be taking longer than expected, CA’s emphasis on four pillars, or what Ayman Sayed, President & Chief Product Officer, called patterns — 1-making the products simpler to use and driving faster time to value; 2-SaaS availability; 3-openness, i.e. any infrastructure, any platform; and 4-AI — figured prominently in the innovation onslaught. Innovation was repeated often in the keynotes and one-on-ones. ”Most everyone in our industry is operationally efficient… but that’s not enough,” said CA CEO Mike Gregoire. “Our job is to break down barriers between technology and innovation,” referring to the event’s ‘No Barriers’ theme. Whether it’s built internally or bought, the company’s promise “and the holy grail” is to take innovation, integrate it with its other offerings and make it a “force multiplier”, he said. The innovations were intended to help address some of the impacts customers are confronting, he said. There has been a shift from building products to providing and supporting business outcomes. Customers are also demanding more intelligence, and security is becoming a bigger concern and a challenge, he added. Customers were another focus for CA, and as important as the announcements were, the “most exciting” news were the “170 customers joining us to talk about using our products to transform themselves,” said Sayed. Then he talked about the products, including the company’s latest artificial intelligence initiatives. CA combined the up and coming technology with its mainframe roots with solutions that ‘help customers speed time to resolution by 5X, reduce insider threats and cut operational expenses by 25%.’ “Through A.I. and machine-learning powered intelligent automation, CA’s new mainframe solutions enable increased insights across broader sets of data,” said CA’s Ashok Reddy, GM, Mainframe, in a prepared statement. It’s not a new concept or term, but as part of its security focus CA is pushing the concept of DevSecOps. In announcing new tools that integrate security throughout the software development lifecycle, Sayed said this approach is “critically important”, and the tools are now available across the company’s Automic, Veracode, and Continuous Delivery portfolios. “Companies that embrace DevSecOps deliver better and...

Read More

Dell’s Futuresville 2.0: Figuring Out What’s Next

ROUND ROCK, TEXAS: For a company that built its early success on best-of-breed business practices and good-enough technology, its decade-long transformation into an ‘innovation machine’ was further underscored last week at the second “Dell Enterprise Innovation Days”. In addition to new — and upcoming — advances in the high-performance computing (HPC) space, the company unveiled Triton, a ‘revolutionary’ water-cooling technology originally created for eBay that can: -deliver up to 59% greater performance than the popular Intel Xeon processor E5-2680v4 for similar costs; -provide double digit performance increases over the highest performing Intel Xeon processor on the market today with a combination of Triton and a customized 200W Intel Xeon processor E5 v4; -use 97% less datacenter cooling power than the average air-cooled datacenter; -consume up to 62% less power than HPE Apollo 8000; and, -has a power usage effectiveness (PUE) as low as 1.02 to 1.03. While Triton may be revolutionary, its prospective customer base, at least initially will be very limited. That’s atypical of Dell, where technological innovation generally has to be practical and have some form of ‘mass appeal’. One appropriate motto for the company is ‘IT for the rest of us’, emphasizing its focus on creating less-complex products and services that meet a sizable market need. Even the Extreme Scale Infrastructure (ESI) group (the new umbrella group under which Triton falls, and which includes Data Center Solutions (DCS), for the top 10 or so hyperscale companies such as Amazon and Facebook, and Datacenter Scalable Solutions (DSS), addressing the next lower tier of hyperscale organizations) deals with massive volumes. DEID2 kicked off with the company’s take on where technology and customers will be — hopefully — coming together in the near future, in Dell’s appropriately named Futuresville 2.0 offices. The first step, is gathering input from practically everybody, both within Dell, and outside, including vendor partners, the channel, academia, and customers, said Robert Hormuth, a Dell fellow and executive director of the Platform Architecture & Technology Group in the Enterprise Office of CTO at Dell. “That gives us a lot of data,” said Byron Blunk, Director, Software and Automation at Dell. “We talk about directionality and big trends and see what resonates with the customers and what doesn’t, and we see where their pain points are. This doesn’t give us the answers, but gives us another piece of input.” “Ultimately we build stuff.” That translates with the group working with Dell’s product teams and with its vendor partners. Open source will be a big part of Dell’s future, as will containers, hyperconvergence and composable infrastructure. “Now it’s the open source community that’s driving… the innovation”, said Don...

Read More
Dell Talks Enterprise Innovation (Part 1 of 2)
Jun01

Dell Talks Enterprise Innovation (Part 1 of 2)

AUSTIN, TEXAS:  When the HP makeover is complete in November, Dell, the not-so-little company that Michael built (which he now calls the biggest startup ever since he took it private), will be the only company remaining that provides a complete(ish) portfolio of products and services for the entire IT market. Customers’ alternatives will be two HP entities, or either IBM or Cisco and their FILL-IN-THE-BLANK partners. The only sole-source, soup-to-nuts, one-throat-to-choke vendor left standing will be Dell. Not bad for a company whose early success was built on doing a better job of selling PCs and x86 servers than its bigger and less agile competitors. However, one of the biggest knocks against the original Dell was that its idea of R&D was what size the logo should be on the box, and where to put it. Not any more, according to company executives at its Dell Enterprise Innovation Day(s) last week. Now that logo size and placement have been laid aside, Dell’s new focus on R&D and home-grown intellectual property is being manifested in a number of ways. For instance last September it announced the opening of the Dell Internet of Things (IoT) Lab, jointly funded by Intel and Dell OEM Solutions, in Santa Clara, Calif. The company said their OEM customers will be able to build, modify and architect new IoT solutions on active bench space within the new lab, i.e. demonstrating large workloads, connectivity, and data modeling and extraction on Dell solutions, that can significantly speed up their time to market with new IoT solutions and devices. The two companies, along with Samsung and Broadcom, also launched the ‘Internet Of Things’ Consortium, an organization created to set standards for connecting billions of household gadgets and appliances. OIC, which will emphasize security and authentication, follows the launch of the AllSeen Alliance, which was announced at the end of 2013, by Haier, LG Electronics, Panasonic, Qualcomm, Sharp, Technicolor, Silicon Image and TP-LINK, and now has 51 members. “We started this group to understand what was needed for world-class, big-iron, enterprise designs,” said Ken Musgrave: Executive Director, Industrial Design, Dell. The design group covers a multitude of disciplines, from engineering to psychology, and is involved with all Dell products, typically starting 36 months before a product is built and shipped. Musgrave said it was clear to customers that Dell’s initial servers were a follow-on of its PC heritage, and that wasn’t good enough. This focus on design excellence is called “enterprise credibility”, to be best of breed, and is being vindicated not only by customer wins, but by the fact that other OEMs are now copying Dell designs. His group’s design mantra, said Tom...

Read More
HP Jumps The Gun On IDF14/Grantley-EP, Unveils Gen9 Servers
Aug29

HP Jumps The Gun On IDF14/Grantley-EP, Unveils Gen9 Servers

With the E5-2600 Xeon processor (AKA Grantley-EP) expected to debut at next month’s Intel Developers Forum (AKA IDF14), HP has jumped ahead of several server vendors with announcements pending, unveiling its new line of ProLiant Generation 9 (AKA Gen9) servers. The company said the new platform’s features and workload-optimized design will help customers reduce cost and complexity, accelerate IT service delivery and enable business growth, advancing HP’s vision for compute, the future of data center technology. To span four architectures – blade, rack, tower and scale-out – the servers are expected to start shipping on September 8th, the day before IDF14 opens. Gen9 is about a new-style IT, the beginning of what HP is calling the Compute Era, John Gromala, Senior Director of Hyperscale Product Marketing, HP Servers, told IT Trends & Analysis. The Generation 9 platform is software-defined and cloud-ready, he said. Both the Moonshot (April 2013) and Apollo (June 2014) server launches, part of an innovation refresh by HP, were very important directions, he said. “Innovation is at the heart of our strategy to turn HP around,” said Whitman, prior to the Apollo launch. At least in part, the innovation is needed because there is a large gap between what users want and what IT delivers, and this has to change, said Bill Veghte, EVP and GM, HP Enterprise Group, kicked things off saying HP is well-positioned to help bridge the gap between the existing and emerging new style of IT. “This is something we do better than anybody else!” During the August 20th earnings call for its fiscal third quarter, HP President and CEO Meg Whitman said the industry standard server (x86) business revenue grew 9% year-over-year, “which represents our fourth consecutive quarter of revenue growth and we expect to take almost a point of share in the second calendar quarter.” According to EVP and CFO Cathie Lesjak, that worked out to $3.1 billion. That 9% means HP narrowly beat the x86 server average revenue increase for the second quarter. “x86 servers managed to produce an increase of 1.4 percent in units in the second quarter of 2014, and an 8.1 percent increase in revenue,” said Jeffrey Hewitt, research vice president at Gartner. HP held down top spot in the server market, based on revenue, with nearly $3.2 billion and 25.1% of worldwide server revenue. IBM (22.4%) was second and Dell (17.4%) came in third. IDC painted a similar picture, putting x86 server revenue growth at 7.8%, and noted that signs continue of a server refresh cycle. The results for HP, IBM and Dell were very close to Gartner’s numbers. “The server market is experiencing the...

Read More