Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business
Sep14

Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (1859)   Last week Equifax, a supplier of credit information, reported that a recent data breach could affect up to 143 million consumers in the U.S. It’s even worse for businesses: according to Cisco’s 2017 Midyear Cybersecurity Report, only 66% of organizations are investigating security alerts, and businesses are mitigating less than 50% of attacks they know are legitimate. More than 150 years ago author Charles Dickens started off his novel ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ with “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”, and that line is still timely when it comes to cybersecurity and the new and improved Micro Focus. The new company officially debuted on September 1 with the ‘spin-merge’ acquisition of Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s software business valued at $8.8 billion, making it the world’s ‘seventh largest pure-play software company’, with annual revenue of $4.4 billion. Chris Hsu, formerly COO of HPE and EVP and GM of HPE Software, is now CEO of Micro Focus. Under the terms of the deal, HPE shareholders own 50.1% of the new company, which works out to approximately $6.3 billion, which is in addition to the $2.5 billion cash payment that HPE received. The deal involved the ArcSight security and Mercury Interactive application management assets, as well as the late and unlamented Autonomy Corp. plc, which HP acquired in 2011 for $11.1 billion (more than $16 billion for all three acquisitions), but ended up writing off almost $9 billion of the purchase price. According to Securities and Exchange Commission filings, HPE’s software business revenue in the 12 months through Oct. 31, 2016 were $3.17 billion. ITOM (IT Operations Management) comprised 61% of the revenue; Enterprise Security Products (18%); Information Management and Governance (16%); and Big Data Analytics (5%). Revenue for all products broke down to: 28% license, 9% software-as-a-service (SaaS), 50% maintenance, and 13% professional services. On Tuesday the company refreshed its expanded security portfolio, with new and enhanced offerings, including: -ArcSight Data Platform (ADP) 2.2 (GA October) brings native, realtime log parsing, security data enrichment and normalization into the innovative Event Broker for security operations that scales to any data volumes, building the power of ArcSight’s connectors directly into the Event Broker; -a new partnership provides IT and security teams with data that has been enriched for better visibility and customization within powerful search dashboards of Elastic; –ArcSight Investigate 2.0 (GA October) with built-in security analytics displayed in pre-defined dashboards that are powered by Vertica to provide actionable intelligence for front-line analysts; -Change Guardian 5.0...

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Intel Extends and Expands… Personal Computing

During his opening keynote at Computex Taipei 2017, Gregory Bryant, corporate VP and GM of Intel’s Client Computing Group highlighted new and updated solutions that he said will help Intel evolve from a PC company to one building “a more immersive, personal, smart and connected world.” The new offerings include: -Intel’s new Core X-series processor family, which scales from 4 to 18 cores with matching price points. The X-series also introduces new Core i9 processors with high performance capabilities ideal for data-intensive tasks like VR content creation and data visualization. These include the 18 core, 36 thread Core i9 Extreme Edition i9-7980XE which Intel said is the “first-ever teraflop desktop PC processor.” -The new Intel x299 chipset is compatible with the new X-series family. It adds significantly more I/O performance and overclocking capabilities to those solutions, and is also compatible with Intel’s recently announced Optane memory technologies. -The updated Turbo Boost Max 3.0 which in Core i9 Extreme Edition chips detects applications requiring higher performance, then shifts those workloads to the best available one or two cores and boosts clock speed accordingly. For example, in Core i9 Extreme Edition solutions, Turbo Boost Max 3.0 can raise the clock speed for single and multi-thread performance from a base 3.3 GHz or 3.6 GHz up to 4.5 GHz. -The new Intel Compute Card allows devices from smart screens to interactive appliances to VR headsets to be easily connected to PCs. These include HTC’s Vive VR headset which can operate wirelessly using Intel WiGig technology. Compute Card solutions are expected to start shipping later this year. -Second generation 3D NAND SSDs, including the Intel SSD DC P4500, P4600 and P4501 Series for use in data center applications, and -Strong support from ecosystem partners for Intel’s new Optane memory technologies, resulting in over 130 Optane-ready motherboards, along with related systems from OEMs and systems integrators. Bryant also stated Intel’s commitment to deliver new 8th generation Intel Core processor-based devices by the 2017 holiday season. The new Core chips are expected to deliver over 30 percent better performance than current 7th gen Core processors. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Is Intel Inside Your Digital Transformation?

Today’s market opportunity for IT vendors is razor-focused on cloud consumption and economics. As a result, it can be easy to lose track of what’s actually powering on-premises data centers, various cloud platforms, and massive numbers of ever-proliferating endpoints. In a prior role, when I was running an IT organization, it was difficult to acquire new servers at the rapid pace at which innovation was happening in the x86 server market—even though each server upgrade would provide an instant increase in application performance. While the performance bump still exists, the benefits extend beyond core performance—so it’s also important to understand the scale and security benefits. And speaking of scale and security, with Citrix Synergy right around the corner, it seems only fitting to take a look at Intel and Citrix. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Intel’s Optane Memory and Incremental Revolution

Vendors love the big splash. Being first to market with major new technologies or delivering wholesale revisions of existing solutions and platforms generates numerous headlines and kudos. But secondary ripple effects can reveal significant progress, too. That’s the case with the new Optane SSD DC P4800X Series offering that Intel announced last month, a solution targeting data center storage applications. That was followed on March 27th with the official introduction of Optane-based memory modules for PCs. This week, Intel announced the commercial availability of Optane memory modules for PCs and other systems leveraging the company’s 7th gen Core processors. Those use cases demonstrate both Optane’s flexibility and how Intel can leverage individual breakthrough developments to pursue multiple markets and deliver substantial benefits. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually
Apr13

5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually

With almost 40 years of IT reporting experience under my — sadly expanded — belt I’ve covered a number of profound developments and countless others of less import, but the eventual emergence of 5G is expected to CHANGE EVERYTHING. Yes, 5G is just a bigger, faster pipeline, but to paraphrase POTUS, it’s going to be huuuuuge: speeds of 10 to 100 gigabits per second (1,000 times faster than the current US 4G average); latency of less than a millisecond (compared to 4G’s 40ms to 60ms); and support for a million connected devices per square kilometer [that’s 5/8th of a square mile for the metrically challenged]. 5G use cases include: Internet of Things (IoT); extreme video and gaming applications; explosive data density usage; public safety; Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) sunset; and context-aware services. User-driven requirements include: battery life; per-user data rate and latency; robustness and resiliency; mobility; seamless user experience; and context-aware network. And from the infrastructure perspective, network-driven requirements include: scalability; network capacity; cost efficiency; automated system management & configuration; network flexibility; energy efficiency; coverage; security; diverse spectrum operation; and, unified system framework. However it is very early in the hype cycle, with final standards 12-18 months away, and products and services expected to trickle out over the next couple of years. The market should become relevant by 2021-22, and there will be 1 billion 5G connections by 2025. So what does that mean to IT and CXOs today? “This is going to be a transformative change even though a couple of years away from mainstream adoption,” said Varun Chhabra, unstructured data expert at Dell EMC. He told IT Trends & Analysis it’s going to be a “gamechanger”. It will enable enterprises and businesses to provide their  customers with “a completely different way to engage with their brands.” While still a work in progress, 5G needs to be: a “chameleon” technology that can adapt to differing demands of wireless services — whether to support high bandwidth, low latency, bursty traffic, ultra-reliable services, or a combination of these capabilities, according to a recent report from the Telecommunications Industry Association. The TIA survey found that operators are uncertain how 5G might prove to be transformative, but while ‘history suggests that while it may underachieve relative to expectations in the short term, it will overachieve in the long term.’ As with any significant technology transition, there are billions of dollars being spent to either lead the change, or at least minimize the threat of being roadkill on the faster, broader information highway. Some proof points include: -5G commercial services will launch in 2020 and there will be 24 million 5G subscriptions...

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