HP Steps Up to AMD Laptop/Desktop Opportunity

There is a lot of distrust surrounding the Intel brand at the moment largely due to a sequence of events which included a slow disclosure of a serious security flaw (which appears to be getting worse), a secret early disclosure of this flaw to China (which has technical ties to North Korea), related patch problems, their CEO apparently fleeing Intel stock. This damaged trust and raised the question of why anyone would want to invest in a company, for product or stock, that the firm’s own CEO didn’t think was a good investment and this comes on top of the insider trading concerns raised by the activity. In the meantime, AMD released their strongest set of processors in their history, generally equal to or better than Intel’s offerings, and providing unique values in areas like single socket servers. Against that launch Dell, HP, and Lenovo brought out new products. However, it is interesting to note, that of the 3 HP was by far the most aggressive releasing entire lines of offerings. Let’s talk about why this could play particularly well for HP. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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DTW18 & Connecting The DoTs (Part 3 of 3)

LAS VEGAS: Of all the leading IT vendors, Dell has done the best job of ‘keeping it simple’, and ruthlessly embracing that mantra in everything it does, and the product launches at last week’s Dell Technologies World 2018 were no exception. Given its major brands — Dell, Dell EMC, Pivotal, RSA, SecureWorks, Virtustream, and VMware — and leadership in 22 product categories, the opportunity was there to release a flood of new and enhanced products and services, but KISS prevailed. Here’s the abbreviated version of the product — and company — news just announced by Dell Technologies: –Dell Technologies Capital emerged from stealth, and announced that it has completed 24 investments in the last year, with one third of new investments focused on AI/ML and the remaining focused on security, next-gen infrastructure and developer ecosystem, including DocuSign, MongoDB and Zscaler; -updated VDI portfolio includes adding the Dell EMC PowerEdge 14th generation infrastructure and simplified configuration options to the Dell EMC VDI Complete Solutions, and the Dell Wyse 5070 thin client, the company’s most versatile and scalable thin client platform; -AI (artificial intelligence) and ML (machine learning) initiatives, including expanding the Dell EMC PowerEdge server portfolio to accelerate AI-driven workloads, analytics, deployment and efficiency, deeper relationships with Intel, and Dell Precision Optimizer 5.0 enhanced with machine learning algorithms, intelligently tunes the speed and productivity of Dell Precision workstations; -additions to the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure portfolio, including a simplified path to VMware-based clouds, and enhancements to VxRail and VxRack SDDC; –Dell EMC PowerMax, engineered with end-to-end NVMe, ready for Storage Class Memory (SCM) and NVMe over Fabrics, making it the world’s fastest storage array built for mission-critical applications of today and tomorrow, as well as Dell EMC VxBlock System 1000 support for end-to-end NVMe with PowerMax, native replication and a new entry point X-Brick system Dell EMC XtremIO, and a sneak peak at Dell EMC PowerEdge MX infrastructure, which is scheduled to be released later this year; -collaboration with Microsoft to build a secure, intelligent edge-to-cloud IoT solution featuring Dell Edge Gateways, VMware Pulse IoT Center and Microsoft Azure IoT Edge; and, -the next generation of Virtustream Viewtrust, its risk management and continuous compliance monitoring solution that offers enhanced scalability, performance, and serviceability to enterprises and public sector organizations with new SaaS capabilities. For more information on DTW18, check out Connecting The DoTs Part 1-Dell and digital transformation and Part 2-analysts’ insights. DISCLAIMER: I hold shares in many of the companies referenced in this article, and Dell looked after airfare and hotel while I was at Dell Technologies World....

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AMD Jumps Past Intel with…

I’ve never seen a company so cripple itself as I have with Intel recently. From OEM support, to marketing, to just good governance—Intel appears to have all but abandoned the PC market even though companies like HP (speaking of HP, they are doing some really interesting things of late) are surging in it. But that has left a huge opportunity for AMD to fill the gap, and this week they announced their second-generation Ryzen Processors. For once however the most interesting things about this release aren’t the processors, but the software and features that AMD wrapped around them. It is this unique value add that I think makes for a very compelling reason to go AMD this cycle, well that and the fact Intel got caught screwing its investors, customers, employees, and country. Let’s talk Second-Generation Ryzen this week: To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel.. Taking Security to the Silicon Level

When it comes to digital security, the past year or so has delivered multiple lessons with a single conclusion: that whatever people, including individual consumers to business organizations to the IT vendors who serve them, have done or are doing regarding IT security, it isn’t enough. Taken in total, the situation may appear hopeless, but it sets the scene for the new silicon-level security technologies and initiatives that Intel announced this week at the RSA 2018 conference. The problem(s) with security The problems dominating security are two-fold. First, computing endpoints, systems and networks have become so complex that the industry’s decades-long approach of building/promoting numerous individual specialty solutions is at the breaking point in terms of working properly and meeting clients’ needs. Customers themselves bear at least part of the blame for these failures. Not only are most unwilling to learn or do what’s necessary to secure their devices against cybercriminals and exploits, but they also expect those products to work without any impact on performance and functionality. That can be a fatal combination, at least when it comes to protecting identity, financial and other assets. The other problem is that the cyberthreat landscape is growing exponentially. The situation is no longer limited to the prototypical evil hackers long-beloved by the mainstream media and entertainment industries. End users also need to worry about having valuable digital information “mined” or otherwise ripped-off by a variety of well-organized and financed cybercriminals and gangs, state-sponsored espionage rings and corporate thieves. And let’s not forget supposedly trustworthy organizations, like social media players that sell their users’ data with little care or oversight until they get caught. Facebook is currently sweating the spotlight, but it’s not like the company is any kind of “lone gunman” in this regard. Plus, there are bumblers like Equifax and other massive credit and finance companies whose efforts to secure consumer data are, to put it mildly, as deeply careless as they are dumbly clueless. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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New Dell PCs – Predictable Evolution and…

The concept of “law” means different things to different people. For some, laws are rules defining conventional/unconventional behavior. For others, they are immutable strictures or even barriers begging to be tested. But I’d argue that the most important (and, ironically, the least discussed) aspect of law is its predictability. That is, laws clearly delineate expectable outcomes with certain events or behaviors. You “can’t drive ‘55”? Don’t be surprised by a traffic ticket and hefty fine when you’re caught. Feel like scamming strangers, neighbors or family members? Maybe a change of scenery for the next 5-10 years would do you good. Rush hour traffic frustrations might make road rage seem reasonable. But in real life with the cops on hand? Not so much. Which brings me to Moore’s Law—the best remembered contribution Intel co-founder Dr. Gordon Moore made to his company and industry. As with more prosaic laws, some in IT considered Moore’s observation to be somehow immutable even though he himself, along with Arthur Rock, understood that economic reality would eventually overtake and erode its value. But the larger benefits of Moore’s Law were found in the predictable insights it provided semiconductor partners and resellers, as well as potential buyers. If you’re thinking of purchasing a new PC or system, how do today’s products match what you can reasonably expect in 12 to 18 months? Do you really need latest/greatest features and performance? Are those qualities needed by a select few or are they important to mainstream users, too? Those points are reflected in Dell’s latest PCs based on Intel’s latest 8th generation “Coffee Lake-H” Core processors. Interestingly, the new solutions’ benefits are designed to touch a wide range of mobile PC customers, including consumers, business people and gamers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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