Is Intel Inside Your Digital Transformation?

Today’s market opportunity for IT vendors is razor-focused on cloud consumption and economics. As a result, it can be easy to lose track of what’s actually powering on-premises data centers, various cloud platforms, and massive numbers of ever-proliferating endpoints. In a prior role, when I was running an IT organization, it was difficult to acquire new servers at the rapid pace at which innovation was happening in the x86 server market—even though each server upgrade would provide an instant increase in application performance. While the performance bump still exists, the benefits extend beyond core performance—so it’s also important to understand the scale and security benefits. And speaking of scale and security, with Citrix Synergy right around the corner, it seems only fitting to take a look at Intel and Citrix. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

Intel’s Optane Memory and Incremental Revolution

Vendors love the big splash. Being first to market with major new technologies or delivering wholesale revisions of existing solutions and platforms generates numerous headlines and kudos. But secondary ripple effects can reveal significant progress, too. That’s the case with the new Optane SSD DC P4800X Series offering that Intel announced last month, a solution targeting data center storage applications. That was followed on March 27th with the official introduction of Optane-based memory modules for PCs. This week, Intel announced the commercial availability of Optane memory modules for PCs and other systems leveraging the company’s 7th gen Core processors. Those use cases demonstrate both Optane’s flexibility and how Intel can leverage individual breakthrough developments to pursue multiple markets and deliver substantial benefits. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More
5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually
Apr13

5G Is Going To Be Huuuuuge… Eventually

With almost 40 years of IT reporting experience under my — sadly expanded — belt I’ve covered a number of profound developments and countless others of less import, but the eventual emergence of 5G is expected to CHANGE EVERYTHING. Yes, 5G is just a bigger, faster pipeline, but to paraphrase POTUS, it’s going to be huuuuuge: speeds of 10 to 100 gigabits per second (1,000 times faster than the current US 4G average); latency of less than a millisecond (compared to 4G’s 40ms to 60ms); and support for a million connected devices per square kilometer [that’s 5/8th of a square mile for the metrically challenged]. 5G use cases include: Internet of Things (IoT); extreme video and gaming applications; explosive data density usage; public safety; Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) sunset; and context-aware services. User-driven requirements include: battery life; per-user data rate and latency; robustness and resiliency; mobility; seamless user experience; and context-aware network. And from the infrastructure perspective, network-driven requirements include: scalability; network capacity; cost efficiency; automated system management & configuration; network flexibility; energy efficiency; coverage; security; diverse spectrum operation; and, unified system framework. However it is very early in the hype cycle, with final standards 12-18 months away, and products and services expected to trickle out over the next couple of years. The market should become relevant by 2021-22, and there will be 1 billion 5G connections by 2025. So what does that mean to IT and CXOs today? “This is going to be a transformative change even though a couple of years away from mainstream adoption,” said Varun Chhabra, unstructured data expert at Dell EMC. He told IT Trends & Analysis it’s going to be a “gamechanger”. It will enable enterprises and businesses to provide their  customers with “a completely different way to engage with their brands.” While still a work in progress, 5G needs to be: a “chameleon” technology that can adapt to differing demands of wireless services — whether to support high bandwidth, low latency, bursty traffic, ultra-reliable services, or a combination of these capabilities, according to a recent report from the Telecommunications Industry Association. The TIA survey found that operators are uncertain how 5G might prove to be transformative, but while ‘history suggests that while it may underachieve relative to expectations in the short term, it will overachieve in the long term.’ As with any significant technology transition, there are billions of dollars being spent to either lead the change, or at least minimize the threat of being roadkill on the faster, broader information highway. Some proof points include: -5G commercial services will launch in 2020 and there will be 24 million 5G subscriptions...

Read More

Cybersecurity Goes Private: McAfee and RSA

There are some interesting industry dynamics going on in the cybersecurity market. Just a few months ago, Symantec bought Blue Coat, taking a private company public and forming a cybersecurity industry colossus in the process. Now two other historical cybersecurity powerhouses are heading in the other direction and going private. When the Dell/EMC deal was approved this week, industry veteran RSA became the security division of the world’s largest diversified private technology company. Not to be outdone, Intel and partner TPG are spinning out McAfee as an independent private company. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

AMD vs. Intel…

Over the next few years we are going to see something we don’t see that often. Two companies in the same market on two very different paths. AMD will be focused like a laser on traditional PC and Server markets but adapting to the new loads and tasks that both are being tossed in. Intel, in contrast, will be expanding massively to drones, IoT and Automotive, each of which has massive, but as yet unrealized potential for firms in their class.   Now typically when AMD and Intel run at each other AMD is massively disadvantaged, but with Intel’s shift in focus they won’t be chasing Intel but a small part of the company and the part that won’t have the greatest interest. The end result is that AMD has the best shot they have had since the early part of last decade to take large chunks of share, but Intel has a shot at getting in on the ground floor of server markets which could end up being larger than PCs have ever been.   So who will win? To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More