Dell Technologies Surveys the Digital 2030 Future

As it has for past future-focused studies, Dell teamed up with the well-respected Institute for the Future (IFTF) to forecast how emerging technologies — notably artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT) — may change the way we live and work by 2030. To extend that work, Dell Technologies commissioned Vanson Bourne, an independent UK research firm, to conduct a survey-based research study to gauge business leader predictions and preparedness for the future. The Realizing 2030 survey was quite large and wide in scope and reach, extending to 17 countries in the Americas, Asia Pacific and Japan, and Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Secondly, more than 10 industries including financial services, private healthcare and manufacturing were covered. Finally, the survey had 3800 complete responses from director and c-suite executives in midsized and enterprise organizations involved in key functions, including finance, sales and R&D in addition to IT. That is an impressive number of respondents and thus should be considered statistically reliable across a number of dimensions. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More
DT Success Is… Elusive
Dec21

DT Success Is… Elusive

Everybody needs it. Most everybody is trying to achieve it. And the majority of those who try fail to realize its benefits. It is digital transformation — AKA DT, DX or Industry 4.0 — the multi-trillion-dollar business phenomenon enabled by cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), big data and analytics (BDA), mobility, social media and security that is reshaping everything for the foreseeable future. Succeeding at DT is the next new normal, and the stakes are literally life and death, i.e. a 33% increase in speed to market; 40% increase in customer satisfaction; and 37% increase in new business revenue. On average, companies going digital expect to increase annual revenues by 2.9% and reduce costs by 3.6%, but businesses going all-in can achieve both revenue gains and cost reduction of more than 30% at the same time. So DT is an extinction-level phenomenom that is transforming all aspects of our lives, and while the stakes are high, the risks — and failure rates — are higher. The failure rates for unsuccessful digital transformation projects range from a low of only 70% to as high as 84%. The biggest DT barrier is cultural resistance to change, followed by legacy IT systems and retaining critical talent, respectively. “One of the things that our research and expertise consistently show is that shifting people and how they need to operate differently are where some of the big challenges are coming from, as more and more companies try to digitally transform,” said IDC’s Shawn Fitzgerald, research director, worldwide digital transformation strategies. Positioned as a Leader in IDC’s Worldwide Digital Transformation Consulting and Systems Integration Services 2017 Vendor Assessment, Accenture is also grappling with DT internally, as its more than 400,000 professionals visit more than 10,000 customer sites daily, said CIO Andrew Wilson. He told IT Trends & Analysis that organizations need to transform from old techniques and waterfall philosophies to much more horizontal processes and experiences. “You have to be much more real-time.” The service provider practices what it preaches, focusing on the new skills and training required to enable an increasingly mobile and dispersed workforce to make the most effective use of the latest technologies. Wilson said his company is working to connect employees through social collaboration tools like The Stream, Accenture’s version of Facebook, that enables employees to stay connected with colleagues and communities, post updates and share knowledge anywhere. It also uses video communications, including the CIO’s monthly talk show for employees that features interviews with executives from Accenture and alliance partners. A key component of the SP’s DT-delivery capabilities is called Accenture Digital — consisting of Accenture Analytics, Accenture Interactive...

Read More

DEW17: Storage On Steroids (& Cloud and Networking)

LAS VEGAS: Digital transformation is the (current) be-all and end-all, but for IT vendors, it’s all about building and selling the products and services that facilitate the DT journey, and in the second segment of our preview of a plethora of pithy product pronouncements, Part 2 we look at Dell EMC’s more mundane announcements, while Part 3 will focus on the revolutionary new payment program that turns CapEx to OpEx and might even help reduce the fear of vendor lock-in. As the dominant enterprise storage vendor, there were a number of storage announcements, including a heaping helping of software-defined storage news: a new release of ScaleIO; Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS) platform updates; IsilonSD Edge enhancements; new and updated Dell EMC Ready Nodes; and a preview of Project Nautilus, a new software-defined solution for storing and analyzing high volumes of streaming IoT data. “While software-defined everything is a critical piece of IT transformation, the reality is that we’re still early with regard to the ability of enterprises to consume software-only offerings,” said Jeff Boudreau, President, Storage, Dell EMC, in a prepared statement. “Offering software-defined storage offerings for on-premises and the cloud, in a variety of deployment models including ready nodes, allows us to meet customers where they are today and take them where they need to be as they transform their IT and their businesses.” Available now are Dell EMC ScaleIO Ready Nodes and Dell EMC VMware vSAN Ready Nodes, with availability on the new PowerEdge servers scheduled for mid-2017. Dell EMC Microsoft Storage Spaces Direct Ready Nodes are scheduled for June, followed shortly on the servers, while Next, ScaleIO.Next, ECS Dedicated Cloud Service and IsilonSD Edge are also expected out soon. If IT is now all about transformation, storage is all about flash, and the two are inseparable, noted Mark Peters, practice director & senior analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group, in a prepared statement. “… All-Flash and scale-out storage solutions — capable of delivering both the high performance and rich data services needed for today’s demanding applications — are critical elements for any enterprise that wants to achieve IT transformation.” Dell EMC made a number of flashy announcements: the VMAX 950F, up to 4x faster than the nearest competitor; XtremIO X2 delivers new levels of efficiency for VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure) and large scale snapshot use cases, with 3x higher capacity, 25% better storage efficiency on average and 80% better response times; Unity All-Flash storage models feature up to 4x larger file system capacity, 8x increase in density and sub 10-minute deployment; SC5020 midrange hybrid storage array offers up to 45% more IOPS, 2x greater capacity and market’s lowest hybrid array $/GB;...

Read More

DEW17: It’s Mainly About DT… and IoT

LAS VEGAS:  In a preview of a plethora of pithy product pronouncements, Part 1 (PPPPPP1 or P61) I’ve taken the first set of Dell EMC’s announcements based on leading-edge hype, digital transformation (DT) and Internet of Things (IoT). The more mundane offerings like storage, appliances and cloud, have been relegated to Part 2, while a seemingly revolutionary new payment plan will get its own focus in Part 3. Only time — and the market — will tell if I got these right. However DT is the focus of both Dell EMC, and Dell EMC World 2017, so that’s where I’ll start. First, while there were DT-flavored announcements, i.e. Dell EMC Drives IT Transformation With the New 14th Generation of PowerEdge Servers and Dell EMC Powers IT Transformation with New Open Networking Products, there were no specific DT products and services announcements. That might be because digital transformation is more of a business phenomenon than a product or service that you can buy. It’s more about the people and processes; products and services are only a means to an end. The only DT-branded announcement, and IMHO that’s a stretch, is the upcoming 14th generation of the Dell EMC PowerEdge server portfolio that help customers drive IT Transformations. The company says it delivers innovation in three areas: a scalable business architecture; ‘intelligent automation’ via expanded APIs and the new OpenManage Enterprise console; and integrated security. Availability is scheduled for mid-year, i.e. real soon. If DT was more a premise or promise than a product, there were a number of IoT announcements, including those from Dell’s VMware subsidiary and Atos. The company bills itself as an ‘IoT heavyweight’, the industry’s ‘broadest IoT infrastructure solutions provider’, and has a ‘complete edge-to-core-to-cloud portfolio of infrastructure for IoT solutions.’ The VMware Pulse IoT Center is a secure, enterprise grade (IoT infrastructure management solution that will enable IT and operational technology (OT) teams to control their IoT infrastructure and things. Due out later this year as both a standalone solution by VMware and partners as well as a bundled offering via partners such as Dell EMC and others, it will provide IT and OT teams visibility and control across their IoT use cases, while offering peace of mind with security capabilities throughout the IoT value chain, stated Mimi Spier, vice president, IoT, VMware. The Atos partnership revolves around an IoT service management framework (Atos Codex IoT Services), that will enable customers to be in control and assure that all users ‘can continuously create value from their connected devices.’ Although very much a work in progress, the framework is available now, combining Dell EMC hardware and software...

Read More
Digital Transformation: Innovation With A Body Count
Apr27

Digital Transformation: Innovation With A Body Count

For the majority of the IT industry’s history the focus has been on efficiency, how to do more with less. More recently, and now lumped under the catchphrase of ‘Digital Transformation (DT/DX)’, the focus has shifted to effectiveness: it’s no longer a case of just doing things right; the emphasis is changing to doing the right things. Increasingly, DT is an extinction-level event — it’s ‘go digital or die’ — and a new survey from Dell EMC reinforces this dire forecast (or incredible opportunity). The business phenomenon Digital Transformation (AKA digitization or Industry 4.0) and its related technologies — cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), big data and analytics (BDA), mobility, social media and security — changes everything… and nothing. New tools and new applications drive new ways of doing things, but ultimately, it’s still about selling more goods and services with acceptable margins. According to the ESG 2017 IT Transformation Maturity Curve study conducted by Enterprise Strategy Group and commissioned by Dell EMC, only 5% of large companies are prepared to meet the IT requirements of the Digital Business era. As do so many similar studies, Dell EMC found that 95% of survey respondents are falling behind their best-of-breed competitors who are accelerating their digital business goals through IT transformation, while 71% agree that they will not be competitive without IT transformation. Given that 96% of the more mature organizations exceeded revenue targets last year and are more than 2X as likely to meet revenue goals, I have to wonder why only 71% seem worried. As Dell EMC President David Goulden noted in the press release, “… the research shows that most respondents are falling behind a small and elite set of competitors who have cracked the IT Transformation code, and they’re competing more vigorously because of it.” Trey Layton, VP and CTO with Dell EMC’s CPSD, told IT Trends & Analysis the study reinforces the company’s belief that this “is more than a business agenda, it is a digital transformation at the foundation.” A major concern is that enterprises’ foundations typically consist of separate silos, and many employees and executives feel trapped. “If you look at the IT organizations we deal with around the world, they’re in various stages of their journey to transformation… but the power centers are siloed… in compute, storage and network silos…” The biggest concern they’re finding when they talk to customers “is that the future space doesn’t have a place for them from a skill-set perspective,” he said. “CIOs are trying to break down those barriers.” Global Knowledge’s 10th annual IT Skills and Salary Survey, released earlier this month, reported that more...

Read More