How Lenovo’s Strategic Partnerships…

Strategic partnerships between IT vendors have existed for decades, and mostly followed conventional synergistic pitches: By combining the products/expertise of vendors A and B, you can get C, or even D or E. Twenty years ago, those relationships mainly consisted of system vendors and specialty ISVs of various sizes and kinds. But the continuing rise of Intel x86-based servers changed the balance due to customers adopting Intel...

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Lenovo, NetApp… Strategic Partnerships

Strategic partnerships are common cause in the IT industry. There are numerous practical reasons for this, including the inherent complexity of modern computing solutions, and single vendors’ inability to effectively address the subtleties of myriad specific markets. But however well-intentioned, the fact is that some of these efforts fail utterly. Why so? Some are built on faulty assumptions or are ineffectively crafted. Others...

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Lenovo Wants to Simplify Conference Room Collaboration…

Equipping a conference room used to be really easy. You’d specify a speaker phone for the room, maybe select a couple of white boards and a flip chart, specify a conference table and chairs and that’d be about it. Video conferencing attempted to disrupt this several times, but a lack of compatibility, poor ease of use, and extreme expense tended to keep it from getting to true critical mass. The bigger problem was the systems tended...

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Lenovo‘s Cool Fix for HPC Energy Consumption

High performance computing (HPC) and supercomputing haven’t always been closely associated with energy efficiency. In fact, for the first four decades (beginning in the early 1960s) of commercial supercomputing, owners were far more concerned with systems’ computational capabilities than the electrical energy they consumed. That was mainly because of the unique value of custom-built systems like the Cray CDC 6600 (delivered in 1964)...

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Lenovo Surfs “Three Wave” Strategy to Success

Consistency may be, as Emerson noted, the “hobgoblin of little minds,” but for performance-focused analysts and investors it can qualify as the difference between a company “walking the talk” and one muttering incoherently in an alleyway. Why is that the case? Partly because it helps clarify central points for market-watchers who hope future events can be prognosticated from today’s tea leaves. In other words, the more often and...

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