HANA Alliance Deepens for Lenovo & SAP

IT vendor alliances and partnerships are more fragile than most of those involved would be willing to admit. Typically, companies ally to pursue specific strategic or market objectives. But in a fast-moving industry like IT, yesterday’s strategies often become as fragrant and desirable as last week’s forgotten gym socks. Partnerships are also often associated with specific executives, withering easily if or when those individuals move on. But the most extreme cases of alliance dysfunction occur around corporate acquisitions. In those situations, it’s common as grass for the involved parties to babble happy platitudes even while they and their customers scramble for the exits. So it is truly remarkable when a strategic alliance not only survives but deepens and improves after one of the partners is acquired. That’s certainly the case concerning Lenovo and SAP, along with the new products and solutions announced at the latter’s Sapphire NOW 2016 conference in Orlando. To read the complete article, CLICK ON AUTHOR’S BYLINE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Why Lenovo Dominates the SAP Hana Market

It is kind of amazing how much Lenovo has changed in the last 15 years or so. In 2001, I doubt most of us had even heard of the company and then they bought the IBM PC product group, along with one of the most iconic PC brands; ThinkPad. Most recently they bought IBM’s System x x86 server business, and on a call last week SAP confirmed that Lenovo sells over 50% of the solutions for SAP’s HANA. SAP Hana is one of the leading analytics engines and it has been designed and tuned to run on x86 platforms. These implementations tend to be large and sell well into the enterprise space which, outside of PCs, hasn’t been a Lenovo strength historically. Consider also that IBM’s System x business was under resourced to a near starvation level and carried massive IBM overhead so it is wonder it even operated let alone came to dominate a critical market segment like SAP HANA. I think it was the result of three things; applied stress, an unusually close relationship with SAP, and Intel. Read more at http://www.tgdaily.com/enterprise/157256-why-lenovo-dominates-the-sap-hana-market#M56KgYATXqHaJmD8.99 NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Lenovo + Juniper: Leveraging the Partnership Model

There are two ways to approach a complex solution opportunity. One is to fully integrate and build it all in-house. This path has been taken by HP and Cisco with regard to the hyperconverged solutions. The other is to partner with vendors whose offerings complement your own, and this is the path that Lenovo and Juniper Networks are on. Let’s talk about the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, then conclude with some comments on the Lenovo/Juniper effort. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Lenovo, Juniper and the Value of IT Partnerships

Strategic partnerships have a long history in the technology industry, and for good reasons: In markets where strategic advantage is rapidly evolving, partnering can allow vendors to get up to speed more quickly and cost-effectively, and with far less risk than developing their own new products. Partnering can also be advantageous when it comes to dealing with shared customers—clients who buy into individual vendors’ ecosystems are likely to be receptive to combined solutions. Finally, though rarer, partnerships can provide an opportunity for companies to get to know one another better, eventually leading to mergers or acquisitions beneficial to both organizations and their clients. That said, strategic partnerships are anything but a panacea. In fact, the IT industry can claim an unfortunately long and storied history of failed and/or abandoned vendor relationships that left the companies’ customers and partners hanging in the wind. But when the relationships are right and vendors commit for all the right reasons, partnerships can benefit virtually everyone involved. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More
EMC: Bringing Hyperconvergence To The Masses
Feb16

EMC: Bringing Hyperconvergence To The Masses

EMC may be busy figuring out its pending future with Dell, but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand that while the overall IT market is inching along at 0.6% growth this year (albeit to $3.54 trillion), the converged infrastructure (CI) market is growing at 10X — 6.2% year-over-year (to $2.5 billion), and the hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) market is growing at 258X, with sales shooting up 155.3% (to $278.8 million) for the last reported quarter. It’s still early days for HCI, but EMC would love to see the kinds of results VMware achieved in the server virtualization space with its latest additions, the VCE VxRail hyper-converged infrastructure appliances (HCIA) for VMware environments. The economic benefits of VxRail are very clear, said Gil Shneorson, VP and GM VxRail, EMC. You can start very small and grow as you need. “That’s very appealing,” he told IT Trends & Analysis. Customers also don’t have to worry about planning ahead. “You don’t have the upgrade event in the future… or have to face issues when you buy a new solution”. EMC has taken all the guesswork out of it, with the integration and automation (and aggressive pricing), said Shneorson. “We think we are the only ones who are doing this.” Integrating the hardware and software together, and supporting it, “that is very important and a very enticing value proposition.” They may be the only ones ‘doing this’, but there are a lot of companies buzzing around the CI/HCI market. IDC estimates that total worldwide spending on converged infrastructure will hit $17.8 billion in 2016, up from $4.6 billion in 2012. It breaks the market down into three segments: -Integrated systems are pre-integrated, vendor-certified systems containing server hardware, disk storage systems, networking equipment, and basic element/systems management software; –Certified reference systems are pre-integrated, vendor-certified systems containing server hardware, disk storage systems, networking equipment, and basic element/systems management software; however, they are designed with systems from multiple technology vendors; and, -Hyperconverged systems collapse core storage and compute functionality into a single, highly virtualized solution. A key characteristic of hyperconverged systems that differentiate these solutions from other integrated systems is their ability to provide all compute and storage functions through the same server-based resources. Gartner also divides the integrated systems market into three broad categories: –Integrated stack system (ISS) — Server, storage and network hardware integrated with application software to provide appliance or appliancelike functionality. Examples include IBM PureApplication System, Oracle Exadata Database Machine and Teradata; –Integrated infrastructure system (IIS) — Server, storage and network hardware integrated to provide shared compute infrastructure. Examples include VCE Vblock, HP ConvergedSystem and Lenovo Converged System (formerly...

Read More