Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future
Apr20

Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future

Pretty much everybody agrees the world is moving to the cloud — public, private (which includes managed as a service) but predominantly the combination of both (hybrid) — and the primary questions are what to move where, and when (how is also a huge concern, but while not easy, it’s really just fiddly bits). Four years ago Cisco started using the concept of the ‘world of many clouds’ to describe its customer-choice model, and earlier this month data and analytics leader Teradata unveiled database license flexibility across hybrid cloud deployments. There has been an “aggressive uptick in interest, if not deployment of public cloud” by the company’s global 1000 customers, said Brian Wood, Director, Cloud Marketing, Teradata. He told IT Trends & Analysis that over 90% of their customers plan to have hybrid IT by 2020, and “85% want to consume as a service.” The company has 100 customers in the multi-petabyte range, with the largest customer in the 90Pb range, so licensing becomes critical, smoothing out the investments, he said. With portability, “ it’s have your cake and eat it too.” This massive move to the cloud, with a mix of public, private, hybrid and on-premise resources means portability — data, software and licenses — is a critical component. Cloud lock-in is no more palatable than vendor lock-in, and while only one vendor, with a limited set of offerings — albeit a set of significant offerings — Teradata says its newest capability, an industry first, gives its data management solution for analytics the ‘very best value proposition.’ “Not only is the database license portable across the hybrid cloud options, but so are workloads, enabled by a common code base in all deployments,” said John Dinning, EVP and Chief Business Officer, Teradata, in a prepared statement. “This flexibility is a first in our industry and means that data models, applications, and development efforts can be migrated or transferred unchanged across any ecosystem.” Looking ahead reinforces the growing cloud-first future, although this cloud shift is not just about cloud, stated Gartner. “This cloud-first orientation will continue to increase the rate of cloud adoption and, consequently, cloud shift,” said Ed Anderson, research vice president. “Organizations embracing dynamic, cloud-based operating models position themselves for cost optimization and increased competitiveness.” Spending on datacenter systems is forecast to be $175 billion in 2017, growing to $181 billion through 2020. However, while DC budgets will be relatively flat, spending on cloud system infrastructure services (IaaS) will grow from $34 billion in 2017 to $71 billion through 2020, account for 39% of total spending on datacenter systems. The latest market data/forecasts demonstrate the headlong rush to...

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