2016 Mobility Trends that Change Employee Behavior

It is fascinating to research and analyze how mobility strategies are changing employee behavior inside the corporate world. Senior business leaders recognize the value and strength in mobility while employees request improved access and enhanced collaboration & communication which all ultimately lead to improved productivity. While the mobility world is rapidly changing and new technology, solutions and business outcomes are being discovered daily, ESG plans to keep a close eye on how businesses morph between traditional desktop and application management to an enhanced digital workspace. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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ESG’s In-Depth Mobility Perspective into a Workspace

IT vendors are fanning the fire when it comes to transforming the way desktops, applications and data are delivered and secured. The construct ESG has been speaking about for some time and continues to use is – workspaces. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE

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Mainframe: IBM’s Golden Oldie Still Got The Midas Touch
Nov11

Mainframe: IBM’s Golden Oldie Still Got The Midas Touch

Like the Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain misquote (mythquote?), reports of the death of the mainframe have been greatly exaggerated. In fact, the mainframe is doing very well, according to the recent BMC 2015 Annual Mainframe Report and a host of other sources, and its prospects have never looked brighter. “Last year the mainframe celebrated 50 years… there are few things in the IT world that have that kind of longevity,” said John McKenny, VP of Marketing and Customer Support of ZSolutions Optimization, BMC Software. A part of the company’s product management process, the 10th annual study was intended to provide a broader understanding of what’s happening in the overall market , as well as to help customers looking for more justifications for their existing and/or future mainframes With the sale of its x86 server business to Lenovo last year, IBM moved into the ‘other’ category in terms of server shipments, but when it comes to revenues, Big Blue held down a respectable third place (13.7%), behind HP and Dell, and $1.8-billion in Q2 (Gartner). IBM’s mainframe sales were up 15% in Q2, following a 30% increase in Q1, primarily driven by the release of new box. “People say the mainframe is dead,” said Vernon Turner, an analyst at IDC, “but we say, hmmm, that’s a $4.5 billion tombstone.” Claire Bailey, Director of Federal, State and Local Solutions, Compuware: “The mainframe is a technically matchless platform. Its performance, scalability, reliability and security are far beyond that of any distributed or cloud infrastructure. In fact, despite the incalculable investments made in these commodity platforms, they have never come close to delivering what the mainframe does. That’s why the most critical workloads in both the public and private sectors continue to run almost exclusively on mainframes.” Chad Rikansrud, aka Bigendian Smalls, infosec and security nerd: “If it’s important, it’s running on a mainframe.” Most Fortune 100s – 90% according to IBM – are mainframe users. In addition: -71% of all Fortune 500 companies have their core business on the mainframe; -23 of the world’s top 25 retailers use a mainframe; -92% of the top 100 banks use a mainframe; -10 out of 10 of the top insurers use a mainframe; -more than 225 state and local governments worldwide rely on a mainframe; and, -9 of the top 10 global life and health insurance providers process their high-volume transactions on mainframe. In many respects, the BMC study’s key findings were similar to previous results, said McKenny. It’s not a huge surprise that the primary growth drivers are security and availability. What was a surprise was the growing interest in the platform. “The amount of...

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SDN/NVF A Work In Progress… And What Progress!
Jul28

SDN/NVF A Work In Progress… And What Progress!

The math is simple: mobility plus Big Data plus the Internet of Things/Everything plus analytics mean networks – datacenter, cloud and at the edge – must handle bigger workloads faster, and IT budgets can’t even come close to addressing these requirements with current technologies. Which brings us to this week’s OpenDaylight Summit, where software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV) will be trumpeted as the technologies that can solve this equation. Whose vision(s) of SDN and NFV will prevail is still very much in question, but what isn’t is the need, and the progress that has been made so far. There are four use cases for SDN/NFV, said Neela Jacques, Executive Director, OpenDaylight, in a phone interview with IT Trends & Analysis. The first is visibility and a better level of unification and orchestration, and while it’s the ‘least sexy’, it represents the biggest opportunity over the next 3-4 years. Customers “are frustrated with existing network management”. The other three use cases are: “trying to do real time management of your network, which is closest to what we consider traditional SDN”; NFV; and the fourth is cloud. Each of these use cases bleed into each other, he said. “At the same time that SDN and NFV are coming up, you’re seeing a shift from proprietary to open-based solutions.” Which leads us to ODL. ‘OpenDaylight is a highly available, modular, extensible, scalable and multi-protocol controller infrastructure built for SDN deployments on heterogeneous multi-vendor networks. In English, instead of jargon, OpenDaylight is meant to handle any level of networking with pretty much any software or hardware. With top backers such as Brocade, Cisco, Intel, and Juniper, OpenDaylight has the business support needed to back up its technical boasts.’ Back in May Jacques stated that the networking industry has embraced open source as the right path forward for SDN, and that OpenDaylight has become the industry’s “de facto standard” open source SDN project. There are over 300 developers working across company lines to deliver a common and interoperable SDN and NFV platform that anyone can see, contribute to and use. ODL members include Brocade, Cisco, Dell, HP, Intel, IBM, Ericsson, Huawei, Oracle, NEC, Microsoft and VMware. A month ago ODL announced Lithium, its third open SDN software release. It also announced the OpenDaylight Advisory Group (AG), consisting of enterprise, telco and academic users who will provide technical input to the OpenDaylight developer community. Foundational members include representatives from Telefónica I+D; AT&T; Orange; CableLabs; JArizona State University; Comcast; Caltech; China Telecom; Nasdaq; Deutsche Telekom; T-Mobile; and China Mobile. According to recent numbers from IHS Infonetics: -the global NFV hardware, software and services...

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Cisco Extreme Makeover: Meraki, Cloud & Software Licensing
Jan28

Cisco Extreme Makeover: Meraki, Cloud & Software Licensing

Towards the end of 2012 Cisco anted up $1.2 billion for Meraki, a developer of wired/wireless LAN and security products managed via the cloud, and primarily targeted at SMBs. While SMBs are at best an adjacent-market opportunity, “Meraki filled a hole in the company’s portfolio”, it has been wildly successful, and has been one of the “consistently strong performers at the company over the past few years”, said analyst Zeus Kerravala. Fast forward two years and Meraki (and Cisco) is getting an extreme makeover as the company looks to reinvent itself once again, ‘rewriting the rules of IT’. Meraki is being re-launched as an enterprise class, cloud-managed IT solution. The company also is announcing Cisco ONE Software, which offers a simplified solution to the most relevant, frequently-used customer scenarios in the data center, wide area network and local access networks, according to John Brigden, SVP of Software Strategy and Operations. “Cisco ONE is a big deal, and it’s an important piece of our larger software strategy in a world where value is increasingly delivered to customers through software.” In an editorial briefing prior to the announcements, executives said the latest developments help them change the conversation from selling systems to selling outcomes. We’re the fifth largest software company on revenues, and the third largest SaaS provider, said Brigden. Cisco’s Rob Soderbery, SVP of Enterprise Products and Solutions, said enterprises are dealing with three big ideas: digitization; simplification; and new models for IT. Businesses are being disrupted and at least 70% are prioritizing and accelerating IT, especially cloud-based, cloud-managed IT. To address this rapidly evolving market Cisco has embraced the cloud, and cloud-enabled network management, he said. The idea behind the new and improved Meraki is to make the network as  easy to operate as your iPhone, said Soderbery. The acquisition was never just about Wi-Fi or SMBs. It’s about making any network of any scale manageable via any browser. It’s about making the network so simple that customers can deploy and troubleshoot it from anywhere without sending IT people to set up new sites, he said. Meraki has added more than 50,000 customers since the acquisition, and grown 108% in the last 12 months, said Soderbery. Now they’re taking it upmarket to large enterprises. Cisco ONE software suites, currently 13, are broken into three categories (called domains): Data Center (covers both networking and compute [UCS]); WAN (Intelligent WAN [iWAN] to connect branches & campus); and Access (wired switching and wireless). The domains are broken into three solution layers: Foundation (includes core networking, security and systems software along with network and energy management); Advanced (advanced software capabilities that are specific...

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