IBM & Anaconda… Cognitive Development

Solutions designed to reduce or eliminate complexity and risk are mainstays in the IT industry, especially when it comes to emerging technologies. The short and long term intentions of such efforts are pretty straightforward; by doing so, vendors aim to ease customers into trying on new offerings in hopes that the experience will result in future sales opportunities. That’s been the case with a number of efforts IBM has initiated around its Power Systems and technologies, including open sourcing its POWER processor architecture and helping to found the OpenPOWER Foundation with vendors interested in leveraging Power across a range of innovative new enterprise and data center solutions. But it’s also apparent in the company’s recently announced partnership with Continuum Analytics to offer its Anaconda Open Data Science platform on IBM’s POWER-based Cognitive Systems and to integrate Anaconda with the PowerAI distribution for machine learning. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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OpenPOWER Foundation Progress Report from GTC 2015

Last October, I wrote a report on the progress of the OpenPOWER Foundation, an organization dedicated to expanding the ecosystem that surrounds IBM’s POWER8 and future generations of POWER processors. In that report I described IBM’s plan to make processor specifications, firmware and related software available to the evolving OpenPOWER community – essentially making POWER an open standard microprocessor. I also described the rapid growth taking place in the OpenPOWER ecosystem. Since its founding in late 2013 by IBM, Google, NVIDIA, Tyan and Mellanox, OpenPOWER has grown to over 110 member organizations. Last week I attended the first annual OpenPOWER Summit (in San Jose, California) which was organized as part of NVIDIA’s GTC 2015 conference and learned that OpenPOWER Foundation members are delivering several new POWER8-based platforms, and supporting IBM’s CAPI and field programmable gate array (FPGA) adapters. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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NVIDIA GTC 2015: Why GPUs Matter to Business

As noted in last week’s Pund-IT Review, I attended NVIDIA’s recent GPU Technology Conference (GTC) 2015 in San Jose mainly for the OpenPOWER Foundation sessions. But a visit to the conference’s exhibit hall and discussions with other attendees got me thinking about just how far graphics processing technologies have progressed over the past decade. In fact, the news out of GTC 2015 suggests that businesses that ignore developments in this space do so at their peril. Why so? Because NVIDIA and its partners, including those in OpenPOWER, along with competitors across the greater IT industry are migrating innovations once relegated to graphics professionals and gaming enthusiasts into increasingly common business processes and IT products. In other words, if sophisticated, graphics-rich solutions aren’t already in your and your competitors’ offices and shops, they likely will be soon. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Pund-IT Spotlight – IBM’s Tom Rosamilia

By virtually any measure, it has been a busy spring for IBM’s Systems and Technology Group (STG). On April 7, the company celebrated the 50th anniversary of its flagship mainframe (System z) platform. Then a week or so later, IBM launched POWER8, which is the latest generation of the microprocessors underlying its market-leading Power Systems solutions. But that same event served as a launching point for the technologies for the OpenPower Foundation, an organization supported by IBM and four initial partners – Google, Mellanox, NVIDIA and Tyan – to develop open source frameworks and methodologies around the POWER microprocessor architecture. Along with publicly revealing products and initiatives developed by Foundation members, the anniversary event also announced that twenty more companies have joined the OpenPower effort. Tom Rosamilia, SVP of IBM STG and IBM Integrated Supply Chain, has deep insight into these and related issues backed by decades of Big Blue experience. Rosamilia joined IBM in 1983 after graduating from Cornell with majors in computer science and economics. After working first as a software developer for the MVS operating system, Rosamilia held a variety of positions in the S/390 (mainframe) organization, becoming VP of S/390 Software Development in 1998. In the following years, Rosamilia was promoted to other leadership roles in IBM’s Software Group, including VP of WebSphere, VP of Development for Data Management, GM of IBM’s Silicon Valley Laboratory and, eventually, GM of IBM’s WebSphere software division. In 2009, he joined IBM’s Systems & Technology Group as GM of System z and, soon after that, Power Systems. Rosamilia then became VP of Corporate Strategy and GM of Enterprise Initiatives where he was responsible for IBM’s strategic direction, as well as for developing the company’s path forward in the new era of computing. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How POWER8 Will Win… Linux/x86 Server Users (Part 3 of 3)

As for me, I’ve concluded that the computer marketplace will self-correct this x86-only situation over time. I am aware of hundreds of data centers that run inefficient, low utilization rate x86 environments – and someday the cost for this inefficiency will manifest itself when CSPs come knocking on the door delivering less expensive cloud solutions. CSPs who use Power Systems can be expected to be in a position to significantly undercut the costs of operating inefficient x86-based data centers. And enterprise executives will ultimately start to steer their businesses toward CSPs in order to lower computing costs as well as to expand their application portfolios. My key point here is that if IBM truly aggressively pursues the CSP market (and sticks with it), there should be a huge payoff in terms of organizations switching to Power Systems through CSPs. They may not see the Power Systems running at the back end, but they will surely experience the benefits of Power Systems superior economics. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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