HPE Switches IoT Focus To Enterprise

While not as critical as analyst Rob Enderle (i.e. Whitman Throws Trump and HPE Under The Bus) when it comes to Hewlett Packard Enterprise, I’ve done my share of HPE mud-slinging, but it looks like the shrinking company — which just got smaller (again) — is making some solid advances in critical markets, including IoT. Sandwiched between the sale of most of its OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets to Linux provider SUSE, and Monday’s unveiling of a micro data center (on wheels), the company made a number of announcements at HPE Discover London (November 29-December 1), including: HPE Mobile Virtual Network Enabler; HPE Universal IoT Platform; Aruba ClearPass Universal Profiler; and, Aruba 2540 Series Switches. A few months ago the company uncorked IoT in a Box, an all-in-one appliance designed to address IoT-at-the-edge applications. IoT is part of the IoE, Internet of Everything, that will deliver up to $19 trillion in value over the next decade. That’s a lot of devices/data to be connected, manipulated and value to be extracted, and doing it at the edge can enable organizations to become digital disrupters within their industries, said Dr. Tom Bradicich, VP&GM, Servers and IoT Systems, HPE. “It’s really a good time to be us.” IT Trends & Analysis spoke with HPE about the IoT announcements. “Iot is one of the top things customers are asking about,” said HPE’s Christian Gilby, Director of Product Marketing, Aruba. He was joined by Jeff Edlund, CTO Communications & Media Solutions, who added “I would want our customers to walk away saying to themselves wow, HPE has the partner system and ecosystem… I can start generating revenues in IoT right now.” The company said it is addressing the biggest barriers to IoT adoption, ‘cost-prohibitive economics’ and the ‘lack of a holistic solution’. By approaching IoT with a growing framework built on edge infrastructure solutions, software platforms and technology ecosystem partners, HPE is addressing the cost, complexity and security concerns of organizations looking to enable a new class of services that will transform workplace and operational experiences, it stated. In addition to its IoT additions, the company announced: the 3PAR Flash Now initiative, which gives customers a way to acquire all-flash technology on-premises starting at $0.03 per usable gigabyte per month; and, an expansion of its composable initiative with the addition of a new hybrid cloud offering and technology extensions to HPE hyper-converged systems. Analyst Patrick Moorhead, Moor Insights & Strategy, gave the company a passing grade for its efforts across the pond. ‘Overall, HPE did what it needed to do at Discover London and it’ll be good when the company churn stops and we...

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OpenStack Summit Day One – Keeping Things Really Weird

If there were any doubts that things might get a little weird at the OpenStack Summit, those fears were quickly put to rest when Boris Renski, CEO of Mirantis, trotted out on stage with a vodka-guzzling Russian bear during the day one keynote. In a refreshingly un-PC presentation, Boris took pot shots at Gartner, IT system administrators and even at AWS. A fusillade of brash open-source bravado speak. And the audience loved it; myself included. In stark contrast to Boris’ presentation, Jonathan Bryce, Executive Director of the OpenStack foundation, focused on some feel-good themes, like how more than 2,300 developers across 345 different organizations contributed to the latest OpenStack release (Mitaka). Bryce pointed out that the vast diversity of the OpenStack community is one of its core strengths. And as I mentioned in a recent blog, the CTO of Volkswagen, Hans Muller, specifically referred to the collaborative strength of the OpenStack community as a major reason why VW chose to standardize on OpenStack for their enterprise cloud environment. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Cloud Computing Drives a New Era in IT Business

Cloud computing represents a shift in enterprise IT. It affects how IT resources and applications are created, purchased, and deployed. Colloquially known as The Cloud, this paradigm of computing has also shifted the business model of the IT industry. It has empowered end-users to seek out their own IT resources, especially applications, fundamentally changing the balance of power when purchasing computing resources. There are three areas of the IT landscape that are affected by the move to the Cloud. They are: Applications, which have seen barriers to creating, deploying, and buying applications disappear for both lines of business and IT purchasers as well as developers. Infrastructure, reducing the need for on-premises data centers while promising infinite scalability Channel partners who are experiencing major changes to how they provide value to customers now that installation and distribution has become more self-service and purchases are made via subscriptions and not on-premises licenses. For more information*, email: info@neuralytix.com *Caveat Emptor: the report retails for...

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IBM Introduces Platform Conductor for Spark

Apache Spark is an open-source cluster computing framework for managing big data infrastructures that often leverage OpenStack Swift object stores. But organizations managing large clusters of compute and storage resources for multiple projects are finding themselves faced with challenges, such as performance and cost, that Swift by itself was not designed to handle. That is why IBM has introduced IBM Platform Conductor for Spark, a software offering whose capabilities help enterprises meet those challenges. But before we get into IBM Platform Conductor for Spark, we need some context, including understanding that the new data-driven world where analytics shines is different from the older application driven IT world. Apache Spark is one of the new technologies that can make the data-driven world work efficiently and effectively, which is why IBM has made a major commitment to it. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Cisco ACI: The (SDN) Beat(ing) Goes On
Dec03

Cisco ACI: The (SDN) Beat(ing) Goes On

For the networking industry — which can make glaciers look like Usain Bolt at work — Cisco’s ACI (Application Centric Infrastructure, AKA Software-Defined Networking) appears to be a runaway success. SDN is networking’s version of server virtualization… on steroids, and in the six quarters that Cisco has been selling ACI (as one of its three approaches to SDN), the company has raced to more than 5,000 Nexus 9K and ACI customers, 1,100-plus ACI customers (that’s more than 100 new customers since the end of October) and almost 50 ecosystem partners. Now the company, which has made a number of ACI announcements recently, is at it again, with a flurry of new enhancements, including beefed up security and Docker support. The announcements will appeal to both N9K switch and non-N9K customers, as well as non-Cisco customers, especially those focused on cloud automation and security, said Srini Kotamraju, Director, Product Management, Cisco. Network automation is a huge opportunity, the company said. “Customers tell me that only five to ten percent of their networks are automated today,” said Soni Jiandani, SVP at Cisco, in a prepared statement. “They are eager to adopt comprehensive automation for their networks and network services through a single pane of management, while improving security for east-west traffic, multi-cloud traffic and bare metal applications in a consistent manner.” Cloud automation and security may be the low-hanging ACI/SDN fruit, but open source and containers are generating a lot of interest too, added Cisco’s Mike Cohen, Director, Product Management. “We are seeing a pretty strong shift by customers interested in open source… (and) containers”. The datacenter and enterprise “In-Use” SDN market is expected to hit $1.4 billion this year, almost double last year’s numbers. “New SDN use cases continue to emerge, and the first half of 2015 was no exception with the establishment of the software-defined enterprise WAN (SD-WAN) market,” said Cliff Grossner, Ph.D., research director for data center, cloud and SDN at IHS. “The data center and enterprise LAN SDN market will be solidified by the end of 2016 as lab trials give way to live production deployments. And in 2017, SDN will move from early adopters into the hands of mainstream buyers,” he said. While Cisco’s numbers appear to put it well ahead of its branded competition, i.e. VMware NSX, the IHS data for the first half of 2015 indicate why this market is so critical to proprietary networking’s 800-pound gorilla: – bare metal switches accounted for 45% of global in-use SDN-capable Ethernet switch revenue; -white box switch vendors, as a group, are #1 in bare metal switch revenue; -Dell owns 100% of branded bare metal switch revenue;...

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