New Dell PCs – Predictable Evolution and…

The concept of “law” means different things to different people. For some, laws are rules defining conventional/unconventional behavior. For others, they are immutable strictures or even barriers begging to be tested. But I’d argue that the most important (and, ironically, the least discussed) aspect of law is its predictability. That is, laws clearly delineate expectable outcomes with certain events or behaviors. You “can’t drive ‘55”? Don’t be surprised by a traffic ticket and hefty fine when you’re caught. Feel like scamming strangers, neighbors or family members? Maybe a change of scenery for the next 5-10 years would do you good. Rush hour traffic frustrations might make road rage seem reasonable. But in real life with the cops on hand? Not so much. Which brings me to Moore’s Law—the best remembered contribution Intel co-founder Dr. Gordon Moore made to his company and industry. As with more prosaic laws, some in IT considered Moore’s observation to be somehow immutable even though he himself, along with Arthur Rock, understood that economic reality would eventually overtake and erode its value. But the larger benefits of Moore’s Law were found in the predictable insights it provided semiconductor partners and resellers, as well as potential buyers. If you’re thinking of purchasing a new PC or system, how do today’s products match what you can reasonably expect in 12 to 18 months? Do you really need latest/greatest features and performance? Are those qualities needed by a select few or are they important to mainstream users, too? Those points are reflected in Dell’s latest PCs based on Intel’s latest 8th generation “Coffee Lake-H” Core processors. Interestingly, the new solutions’ benefits are designed to touch a wide range of mobile PC customers, including consumers, business people and gamers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…Why [Dell] Premium Support Makes Sense…

While Dell Premium Support Plus likely sets the bar now regarding support programs, they make sense for PCs regardless of who you buy from. They assure you get a better experience, they get your PC back to you in the shortest time possible (or replaced), and, increasingly – as with Dell’s program – they will be able to correct problems before you even know you have them, substantially reducing time and lost work. In the end PC support programs (and I would include their peers in terms of extended warranties for complex appliances) perform a valid service and the most important benefit remains that you’ll likely be happier with your purchase and the related vendor if you get one. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How Android and Chrome Integration…

Part of my work as an IT industry analyst involves talking with reporters, a process I enjoy that also helps keep me aware about breaking news stories. So when a reporter called me on Monday to discuss rumors that Google is readying a broad integration that would allow Android apps to run on Chrome-based devices, like Chromebooks, I took a close look. To read the complete article, CLICK ON AUTHOR’S BYLINE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell Announces New Commercial Client Solutions and Services

Overall, these latest offerings offer clear insights into Dell’s efforts as a commercially-focused vendor. Rather than pursuing innovation for innovation’s sake, the company instead focuses on solving the common, real-world problems its customers face day in and day out. During the past half-decade, Dell has also stepped up its design game to the point that it can and does compete head-to-head with some of the industry’s heaviest hitters. The company’s main competitive advantage may be that continuing laser focus on fulfilling businesses’ evolving computing needs and requirements, in any locale and circumstance. If past success is any measure of future opportunities, these newest Dell commercial client solutions should find many ready and willing customers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column will be published in this week’s Pund-IT...

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Amidst Trials And Tribulations: HP’s Road To Re-Discover-y
Jun08

Amidst Trials And Tribulations: HP’s Road To Re-Discover-y

LAS VEGAS: Along with 12,000 or so of its customers, partners and staff – with or without the 11,000-16,000 employees who were added to the soon-to-be-ex-HPer list two weeks ago – I’m back in Sin City for HP Discover 2014. With most of the action taking place on Tuesday and Wednesday, I thought I’d take a look at some of the recent developments at the world’s largest IT vendor, including its latest financial results, new job cuts and growing datacenter aspirations. Best known for PCs and printers, and stuck in commodity hell like its much smaller IBM-wannabe competitor Dell, HP has been struggling to become more of an enterprise products and services powerhouse. Cisco CEO John Chambers painted a bleak picture for HP (and IBM) at last month’s Cisco Live. “You’re going to see a brutal, brutal consolidation of the IT industry,” he warned, hinting at a “musical chairs-like movement” over the next few years. He further predicted that many of the current players in “high tech” won’t exist 10 years from now. Citing Gartner research and recent earnings reports, Chambers pointed fingers at IBM and Hewlett-Packard, saying the beleaguered tech giants haven’t produced revenue for some time. Following on the heels of Chambers’ comments, HP’s latest financial results, flat sales for Q2, and an additional 11,000-16,000 job cuts, didn’t make things easier for CEO Meg Whitman. This will bring the total number of employees leaving under the previously announced 2012 restructuring program to as many as 50,000, she said during the following analysts’ call. “No company likes to reduce their workforce but the reality is that HP must be maniacally focused on continuous improvement in our cost structure.” The extra staff cuts will result in gross savings of a $1 billion. That is incremental to the $3.5 billion to $4 billion that we announced for the 34,000, she said. Whitman also commented on the overall shape of the company, how its doing halfway through her five-year reorganization makeover, and living in a market that’s shifting at “warp speed”. “This is the fastest market shift I’ve seen in my career. And by the way you know I grew up mostly in the consumer space which tends to move faster than the enterprise space. I would actually say, I am feeling more confident because we have seen a stabilization of revenue, the very high single digit declines are over. We’ve had three quarters of pretty good stabilization. And I really like our product roadmap.” However Technology Business Research believes more far-reaching changes are required. HP Software’s bread-and-butter, ITSM, is moving to a services-led model, a transition which was initiated by...

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