IBM Charts Multi-Cloud Progress

Though the tech industry is subject to consistent and considerable disruption it’s hard to think of a more fundamentally disruptive technology than cloud computing. Why do I say that? For three reasons: First, because the success of early cloud movers and shakers (especially AWS), enabled businesses and consumers to effectively sidestep IT powers that be, including system and software vendors. In addition, cloud takes advantage of compute infrastructures developed, implemented and managed by companies that mainly do business with ODM manufacturers, putting further pressure on traditional enterprise vendors. Finally, by essentially outsourcing IT functions to cloud service providers (CSPs), organizations also cut back engagements with IT services professionals and organizations. Despite those and other challenges, it isn’t impossible for mainstream vendors to succeed with cloud initiatives. In fact, IBM moved forcefully into cloud computing with numerous, continuing strategic investments and initiatives. It also made cloud one of its five Strategic Imperatives (along with analytics, mobile, social and security), and announced in its most recent earnings call that IBM Cloud drove $15.8B in company revenues over the last 12 months. On November 1-2, the company hosted media and analyst events in New York City to detail its cloud-related efforts and progress. Following are a few thoughts on what I saw and heard there. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

IBM Advances Cluster Virtualization…

On the classic Groucho Marx quiz show You Bet Your Life if a contestant accidently said the “secret word” of the day, he or she would win a prize. There’s no prize included in this commentary, but the secret word of the day is virtualization, especially as it relates to IBM’s new HPC and AI solutions. IBM defines virtualization as “A technology that makes a set of shared resources appear to each workload as if they were dedicated only to it.” IT is very familiar with this concept, what with operating system-level virtualization, server virtualization, network virtualization, and storage virtualization all continuing to permeate more and more through computing infrastructures and the collective consciousness. So, it should come as no surprise that IBM is advancing the concept of cluster virtualization in its latest announcement, tying it closely to cloud and cognitive computing. IBM’s cluster virtualization initiative combines products from its Spectrum Computing family, namely Spectrum LSF, Spectrum Symphony, and Spectrum Conductor, along with overall cluster virtualization software (Spectrum Cluster Foundation) to manage the whole process. And that includes the storage that is delivered through IBM Spectrum Scale, another member of the IBM Spectrum Storage family. The goal of this approach is to automate the self-service provisioning of multiple heterogeneous high-performance computing (HPC) and analytics (AI and big data) clusters on a shared secure multi-tenant compute and storage infrastructure. Doing so delivers multiple benefits to numerous technical computing end users, including data scientists and HPC professionals. The announcement focuses on these products: IBM Spectrum LSF, IBM Spectrum Conductor, and IBM Spectrum Scale. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

BlackBerry: Avoiding Death By Autonomous Car

I’m at the annual BlackBerry Security Summit this week. The session I was most interested in was on Security and Autonomous cars. This is because these cars will likely be the very first wave of truly autonomous robots we will have around us and as a big Terminator fan, I’m a tad worried about any proliferation of autonomous robots that could potentially decide I’m a speedbump. This could too easily happen if these coming robotic platforms aren’t secured. Whether it is a hostile government, terrorist group, or just a bunch of kids with more skills than sense the chance these things will become hostile is very high unless they are properly secured. BlackBerry is focused on fixing that problem which, for me, means they certainly have my attention in addition to my support for this critical effort. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Lenovo DCG – Continuing to TRANSFORM…

Back in June, I attended a media and analyst event in New York City hosted by Lenovo’s Data Center Group (DCG) and entitled, TRANSFORM. The point of the event was to highlight the strategic expansion and repositioning of DCG’s enterprise portfolio to address and support what Lenovo CEO Yuanqing Yang called an “intelligence (industrial) revolution that is already here.” The primary drivers for this revolution are the massive growth of information, along with advances in big data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI). The value of that information rests in the insights it provides about business processes, customers, suppliers, partners and competitors. Some might say that Lenovo’s strategy offers little in the way of new or original thinking. After all, most or all other system vendors and server makers support initiatives that are similar to Lenovo’s. But the bigger questions are in how the company’s new DCG portfolio approaches those issues, how it is continuing to evolve and how well its strategy is resonating with customers. Let’s consider those points further. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Apple vs. Qualcomm: Apple’s Dangerous Gambit

Apple and Qualcomm are at war, but Apple is dangerously close to looking like the bully who complains about his victim’s violence because the bully’s knuckles are bloody. “Look what that guy’s face did to my hand!” The base cause of the dispute is that Apple has been unable to increase revenues by growing volume and has had to resort to increasing prices instead—and their efforts to increase margins have largely resulted from pounding their suppliers to reduce costs. These suppliers mostly folded with Qualcomm being the most visible exception. So, while complaining that Qualcomm had too much power, Apple has effectively cut off a massive amount of Qualcomm’s revenue, showcasing what looks like an excessive amount of power by Apple instead. Fortunately, Qualcomm is more diverse in terms of revenue sources so they are surviving this impressively well but that also points to Apple’s lack of revenue diversity (only one of their diversity problems) as a problem. Add to this claims that Apple must use Qualcomm’s technology while Apple is allegedly designing out that same supposedly critical technology and Apple has the beginnings of what could be a significant credibility problem in the courts. But the real issue is that Apple is increasingly putting iPhone users in the cross hairs of their actions and that never ends well. Let me explain. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More