HPE Buys its Way Up-Market in Hyperconverged Systems

HPE’s announced plan to acquire SimpliVity for $650M says interesting things about the state of both HPE and the market for software-defined, hyperconverged infrastructure solutions. There are certainly good business reasons to pursue such a deal. As HPE noted in its announcement, the hyperconverged market (estimated to be approximately $2.4 billion in 2016) is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 25 percent, to nearly $6 billion, by 2020. Compare that to the recent single-digit gains in volume sold and flat or declining revenues in overall general purpose server sales, and you can see why HPE believes SimpliVity should help buoy up its bottom line. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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..How NVIDIA Flourished… & Yahoo’s Board Killed Yahoo

There are times when I truly wonder if boards are staffed with idiots. The contrast between NVIDIA and Yahoo is stark. NVIDIA is a hardware-based company in an internet world and Yahoo is one of the founding internet companies, yet NVIDIA is the fastest growing company in the Fortune 500 and Yahoo may not be around by the end of the year. At the heart of why NVIDIA is doing very well and Yahoo is failing is the application of common business practices and excellence in execution. In short, things we learn in business 101. This isn’t to say what NVIDIA has accomplished is easy—far from it—and like every company in this space the near rabid and ultimately pointless move to mobile almost did NVIDIA in but it never faltered or lost focus on what it is. At the heart of all of this is the bad idea that you don’t need subject matter experts at the top of a company—something that this comparison should disprove definitively. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM’s DS8880: Sharpening the Focus on Mainframe Storage Needs

It’s been an odd half decade or so for the data storage industry. Despite the central roles that storage plays in IT products of every sort, storage vendors have been under pressure as traditional markets and opportunities continue to erode. Why so? For two reasons. First, because of the ongoing commoditization of storage components and hardware. Second, cloud players are using what are essentially loss-leading storage services to lure consumers and businesses, alike. What are storage vendors to do in such circumstances? There’s no single or simple fix, but one approach is to willingly embrace leading edge storage technologies, like NAND-based flash drives. Another involves closely tracking and developing solutions that address clients’ core business needs. IBM’s new DS8880 all-flash storage family highlights how the company is pursuing both these paths to its customers’ and its own benefit. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell EMC at University of San Diego…

Supporting and delivering IT services from remote data centers existed long before AWS was a twinkle in Jeff Bezos’ eye. Remote data centers have always played key roles in back-up and disaster recovery practices. Hosted services got a serious boost in the dot.com era as businesses began exploring the value of leveraging the Internet or proprietary networks for numerous business applications and processes. It can be and certainly has been argued that cloud computing is merely a new take on a very old subject. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it has probably helped legitimize cloud for some people who would have otherwise viewed AWS and other cloud providers with unwarranted skepticism. But is cloud as unreservedly beneficial to businesses’ capital outlays and operational processes as proponents claim? To read the complete article. CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM and AA – An Innovative Partnership Heads to the Cloud

In an IT industry that is both dynamic and frangible, an organization like IBM stands out. That’s partly due to its remarkable longevity which at a century and counting is more than two of its senior-most major competitors, HPE and Oracle, combined. But the company’s durability and its approach to computing innovation is also reflected in its relationships with customers and partners. Last week’s announcement concerning one of those customers – American Airlines (AA) – marked a notable strategic partnership and significant milestone for both organizations. Why notable? Because the agreement means that AA, the world’s largest airline (currently offering about 6,700 flights per day to nearly 350 destinations in more than 50 countries), has chosen IBM to be its cloud computing provider “for greater enterprise flexibility, scalability and reliability.” Why significant? Because the new deal is just the latest development in a partnership that dates back over six decades to the 1950s when AA and IBM developed the airline industry’s first electronic reservation and ticketing system. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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