IBM DB2 Direct vs. Oracle: Innovation Is the Best Revenge

The tech industry has long promoted the concept and value of “co-opetition” – a process in which even viciously competing vendors can, in some areas, willingly cooperate in mutually beneficial ways. There are countless examples where the co-opetition dynamic works as advertised, some of them going back for decades. For example, system vendors that develop their own networking switches, including Dell, HP and IBM also sell Brocade, Cisco and/or Juniper solutions. Similarly, though most major server vendors have their own in-house storage systems, they also support offerings from storage specialists, including EMC, HDS, NetApp and many others. That doesn’t mean that co-opetition partners don’t occasionally get on the wrong side of one another. For example, Cisco’s decision to launch its own Unified Computing System (UCS) servers in 2009 rubbed many of its system vendor partners the wrong way. Then again, Cisco got some of its own back when strategic partner (and then-fellow VCE co-owner) VMware bought Nicera in 2012 to get a leg up in software-defined networking. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Apple Makes Huge Mistake At WWDC 2017

I’d tuned into the Apple World Wide Developer’s conference a tad late and missed the opening video but when I went back to check my notes on the keynote I had a WTF moment. Watch the start of the Tim Cook keynote for the show. To save you time it starts with a video of a guy who is brought into what looks like a data center, he is kind of an idiot. He unpacks his stuff and then wants to plug in his new age desktop waterfall and pulls the plug on what looks like a server or network tower in order to do this. When that component goes down it causes a cascade failure for all of the iPhones, Apple Watches, and iPads in the world. This collapse turns the world into a Mad Max future where cars don’t run, there appears to be no power, people are revolting, and everything pretty much sucks. The stated message was that the world depends on apps, but what the film seemed to showcase was that there is single point of complete failure for the entire Apple ecosystem and if it goes down our world collapses with it. Let’s talk about why it is really stupid for Apple to give folks the ideas that the platform is massively vulnerable and this vulnerability could destroy lives. You know I might be able to just stop there… For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

IBM Goes to War with Oracle…

We often talk about current rivalries like Google vs. Apple vs. Microsoft, but these pale next to some of the wars that have gone back decades. Granted the Sun vs. IBM war is long over and—surprisingly—IBM won. In fact, IBM has only lost one big battle historically, and that was against software company Microsoft. But another war that likely sets the record for length and resources is the one between IBM and Oracle—which many of us largely forgot about until recently. Well, apparently, IBM didn’t forget and I’m sure Oracle has been reminded of this fight because IBM just went after Oracle with guns blazing and it is an impressive effort. I’ve received feedback from some of the customers that have recently migrated from Oracle’s offerings to IBM and they appear to be singing IBM’s praises. For me, this is interesting because one of the frustrations I had when I worked at IBM was that IBM seemed to be afraid to take the gloves off, and ended up being the punching bag more often than not. As an employee working for a firm that refused to take the fight to a competitor wasn’t exactly a morale booster. So, it is great to see the firm finally take the gloves off with Oracle. Let’s talk about that this week. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

IBM… Details New Nanosheet Transistors for 5nm Chips

IBM and its Research Alliance partners, including GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung announced that they have developed an industry-first process for building silicon nanosheet transistors that will enable 5 nanometer (nm) chips. Microprocessors manufactured with this process will incorporate as many as 30B switches on a fingernail sized chip, half again as many as the 7nm/20B transistor chips the Alliance announced less than two years ago. Scientists at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering’s NanoTech Complex in Albany, NY who work with the alliance used stacks of silicon nanosheets as the transistor device structure. This breakthrough design can replace the standard FinFET architecture the semiconductor industry has used up through existing 7nm node technologies. The Alliance-led effort is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating stacked nanosheet devices that support electrical properties superior to FinFET. It also successfully extends the exploratory work in nanosheet semiconductor technologies that IBM has pursued for over a decade. According to IBM, compared to existing leading-edge 10nm chips, nanosheet-based 5nm technologies can deliver as much as 40 percent performance enhancements at fixed power, or 75 percent power savings at matched performance. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

How To Prevent VR from Becoming the Next 3D

There is a common recurring problem, and set of mistakes, in the technology market. Basically, the industry gets excited about a new technology but either loses track of—or never finds—a customer for it. It spends billions in marketing and development only to find that there is no one that wants to actually buy the thing. Color TV actually started out this way, laser discs, the first couple iterations of the smarthome, quadraphonic technology, the first Windows Tablets, hoverboards, and positional cameras on game consoles—all at one time drifted into or were killed by this nasty practice, taking with them the jobs of an impressive number of people. Right now, virtual reality (VR) technology is on this same path largely because of a common mistake, a failure to first define what a broad market acceptable solution would be before presenting it as a broad market product. Now I don’t think VR has to fail. There is a path to success and color TVs, and the iPod showcase how to do this while 3D TV recently showcased how not to do it. Let’s talk about how to turn VR into a success, because recent studies indicate that is not the path it is on. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More