IBM Goes to War with Oracle…

We often talk about current rivalries like Google vs. Apple vs. Microsoft, but these pale next to some of the wars that have gone back decades. Granted the Sun vs. IBM war is long over and—surprisingly—IBM won. In fact, IBM has only lost one big battle historically, and that was against software company Microsoft. But another war that likely sets the record for length and resources is the one between IBM and Oracle—which many of us largely forgot about until recently. Well, apparently, IBM didn’t forget and I’m sure Oracle has been reminded of this fight because IBM just went after Oracle with guns blazing and it is an impressive effort. I’ve received feedback from some of the customers that have recently migrated from Oracle’s offerings to IBM and they appear to be singing IBM’s praises. For me, this is interesting because one of the frustrations I had when I worked at IBM was that IBM seemed to be afraid to take the gloves off, and ended up being the punching bag more often than not. As an employee working for a firm that refused to take the fight to a competitor wasn’t exactly a morale booster. So, it is great to see the firm finally take the gloves off with Oracle. Let’s talk about that this week. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM… Details New Nanosheet Transistors for 5nm Chips

IBM and its Research Alliance partners, including GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung announced that they have developed an industry-first process for building silicon nanosheet transistors that will enable 5 nanometer (nm) chips. Microprocessors manufactured with this process will incorporate as many as 30B switches on a fingernail sized chip, half again as many as the 7nm/20B transistor chips the Alliance announced less than two years ago. Scientists at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering’s NanoTech Complex in Albany, NY who work with the alliance used stacks of silicon nanosheets as the transistor device structure. This breakthrough design can replace the standard FinFET architecture the semiconductor industry has used up through existing 7nm node technologies. The Alliance-led effort is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating stacked nanosheet devices that support electrical properties superior to FinFET. It also successfully extends the exploratory work in nanosheet semiconductor technologies that IBM has pursued for over a decade. According to IBM, compared to existing leading-edge 10nm chips, nanosheet-based 5nm technologies can deliver as much as 40 percent performance enhancements at fixed power, or 75 percent power savings at matched performance. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How To Prevent VR from Becoming the Next 3D

There is a common recurring problem, and set of mistakes, in the technology market. Basically, the industry gets excited about a new technology but either loses track of—or never finds—a customer for it. It spends billions in marketing and development only to find that there is no one that wants to actually buy the thing. Color TV actually started out this way, laser discs, the first couple iterations of the smarthome, quadraphonic technology, the first Windows Tablets, hoverboards, and positional cameras on game consoles—all at one time drifted into or were killed by this nasty practice, taking with them the jobs of an impressive number of people. Right now, virtual reality (VR) technology is on this same path largely because of a common mistake, a failure to first define what a broad market acceptable solution would be before presenting it as a broad market product. Now I don’t think VR has to fail. There is a path to success and color TVs, and the iPod showcase how to do this while 3D TV recently showcased how not to do it. Let’s talk about how to turn VR into a success, because recent studies indicate that is not the path it is on. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel Extends and Expands… Personal Computing

During his opening keynote at Computex Taipei 2017, Gregory Bryant, corporate VP and GM of Intel’s Client Computing Group highlighted new and updated solutions that he said will help Intel evolve from a PC company to one building “a more immersive, personal, smart and connected world.” The new offerings include: -Intel’s new Core X-series processor family, which scales from 4 to 18 cores with matching price points. The X-series also introduces new Core i9 processors with high performance capabilities ideal for data-intensive tasks like VR content creation and data visualization. These include the 18 core, 36 thread Core i9 Extreme Edition i9-7980XE which Intel said is the “first-ever teraflop desktop PC processor.” -The new Intel x299 chipset is compatible with the new X-series family. It adds significantly more I/O performance and overclocking capabilities to those solutions, and is also compatible with Intel’s recently announced Optane memory technologies. -The updated Turbo Boost Max 3.0 which in Core i9 Extreme Edition chips detects applications requiring higher performance, then shifts those workloads to the best available one or two cores and boosts clock speed accordingly. For example, in Core i9 Extreme Edition solutions, Turbo Boost Max 3.0 can raise the clock speed for single and multi-thread performance from a base 3.3 GHz or 3.6 GHz up to 4.5 GHz. -The new Intel Compute Card allows devices from smart screens to interactive appliances to VR headsets to be easily connected to PCs. These include HTC’s Vive VR headset which can operate wirelessly using Intel WiGig technology. Compute Card solutions are expected to start shipping later this year. -Second generation 3D NAND SSDs, including the Intel SSD DC P4500, P4600 and P4501 Series for use in data center applications, and -Strong support from ecosystem partners for Intel’s new Optane memory technologies, resulting in over 130 Optane-ready motherboards, along with related systems from OEMs and systems integrators. Bryant also stated Intel’s commitment to deliver new 8th generation Intel Core processor-based devices by the 2017 holiday season. The new Core chips are expected to deliver over 30 percent better performance than current 7th gen Core processors. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Jaguar, the Hyperconverged Company and…

At Dell EMC World last week, one of the most interesting conversations I had was with Jaguar’s CIO, Simon Bolton, who is driving what has been an incredibly successful IT effort at Jaguar. In the company’s new “Green Field” plants, Bolton championed what used to be called Dell’s VCE platform with nearly unbelievable result in terms of productivity and uptime. This was fascinating to me for several reasons; 1) it was a showcase for the power of the hyperconverged concept, 2) I own two Jaguars, and, 3) I’ve been trying (so far unsuccessfully) to order the new Jaguar iPace. Oh, and, 4) when I was younger, for a time, I was a Jaguar mechanic. So, this was a chance to blend my car hobby with my passion for the concept of how to do IT successfully. But I also came around to the idea of IT Entropy because, during the event, I found out there were some unhappy Dell Hyperconverged customers and the cause was something I’m calling IT Entropy, which will likely hurt Jaguar’s effort to convert old plants to this new concept. Let me explain. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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