Cybersecurity PTSD

According to ESG research, 51% of organizations report having a problematic shortage of cybersecurity skills in 2018. This is up from 45% in 2017. The cybersecurity skills shortage has multiple implications. Organizations don’t have the right sized teams and operate in a perpetually understaffed mode. Often, the cybersecurity team lacks some advanced skills in areas like security analytics, forensic investigations, or cloud computing security, putting more pressure on the most experienced staffers to pick up the slack. Finally, many organizations are so busy with day-to-day security operations that they have little time for ongoing cybersecurity training. According to research from ESG and the information systems security association (ISSA), 62% of cybersecurity professionals believe that their organization is not providing an adequate level of training for them to keep up with business and IT risks. Clearly the cybersecurity skills shortage is affecting organizations, but what’s often overlooked is the impact it has on the cybersecurity pros in the trenches. For example, the ESG/ISSA research indicates: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Cybersecurity, Business, and IT Relationships

As the old adage states: People are the weakest link in the cybersecurity chain. This is a problem because strong cybersecurity depends upon both individual skills and organizational collaboration between cybersecurity, business, and IT groups. To use another analogy, cybersecurity is a team sport. If the cybersecurity team doesn’t communicate and collaborate well with other groups within an organization, it will be difficult if not impossible to stay current with what’s needed for security incident prevention, detection, and response. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Way We Work Isn’t Working
Sep29

The Way We Work Isn’t Working

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” Albert Einstein Making change work …while the work keeps changing is a complex task, and IT keeps on complicating things. With trends like Big Data analysis, cloud, the Internet of Things, software-defined-everything, mobile first and a cybersecurity threat environment that just keeps growing, it’s not about staying on top of change. Increasingly it’s about not falling too far behind, and that has critical implications in the skills required to survive – if not succeed – in the information economy. According to new research from the Enterprise Strategy Group, Network Security Trends in the Era of Cloud and Mobile Computing, there is “a pretty substantial skills gap”: -30% of organizations say that the network security skills of the infosec staff are inadequate in some, most, or all cases; -44% say that the number of networking/security staff with strong knowledge in both security and networking technology is inadequate in some, most, or all cases; -38% say that the ability of the security staff to keep up with network security changes is inadequate in some, most, or all cases; -37% say that the ability of the security staff to keep up with the threat landscape is inadequate in some, most, or all cases; and, -47% say that the number of employees dedicated to network security is inadequate in some, most, or all cases. What’s troubling about this, states ESG Senior Principal Analyst Jon Oltsik, is that network security is nothing new. Even the US Senate recognizes the seriousness of the problem, but what does this say about all the new skills shortages cropping up? Earlier this month IBM announced Watson Analytics, a new, highly integrated cloud environment that greatly simplifies the role of the data scientist, according to Joe Clabby, Clabby Analytics. It may not solve the problem of where are all the data scientist skills going to come from, but it appears to take a big step in that direction. “From our perspective, IBM’s Watson Analytics represents a transformative event for the analytics industry – it uses cognitive computing combined with traditional analytics to develop new insights.” According to a recent IBM survey, most businesses are not ready for a digital work environment, and lack the focus and skills to make that change, noted Stowe Boyd, Lead Analyst, Future of Work, Gigaom Research. Published by the IBM Institute for Business Value, the report concluded that most companies lack people at all levels with the skills to take on major change initiatives large enough to transform the business. Big Blue is doing more than publishing this and...

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More Alarming Data on the Cybersecurity Skills Shortage

ESG recently published a new research report on network security titled Network Security Trends in the Era of Cloud and Mobile Computing. Within this project, ESG asked 397 security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees) to rate their security teams in a number of network security areas. Once again the data points to a pretty substantial skills gap: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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IBM’s Watson Analytics: Addressing the … Skills Shortage

About four years ago, after attending IBM’s Information on Demand conference in Las Vegas, I praised the company for making huge investments in analytics software and related infrastructure – but I also wondered “where are all the data scientist skills coming from?” I got my answer last week at an IBM event in New York City when the company announced a new, highly integrated cloud environment called “Watson Analytics”. This environment greatly simplifies the role of the data scientist – the person who looks deeply for new insights contained in enterprise and departmental databases. More importantly, it makes it easy to clean and enhance data; it offers a simple human to machine interface; and it presents resulting queries in graphic form using a “storyboard” approach. In short, Watson Analytics automates 80% of the rote manual data cleansing/query work, enabling data scientists to focus more strongly on analytics-related activities. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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