Will Cloud DevOps Re-Energize ‘Big Iron’?
Oct05

Will Cloud DevOps Re-Energize ‘Big Iron’?

Not only has ‘Big Iron’ shrugged off its naysayers — suffering neither Monty Python’s ‘flesh wounds’ nor Mark Twain’s ‘reports of my death’ — the mainframe appears to be poised for a renaissance, one that software developer Compuware hopes to accelerate with its recent DevOps announcement for Amazon’s popular AWS cloud platform. “We’ve made Topaz [its flagship solution for mainframe Agile/DevOps] into what customers are evaluating and incorporating as a force multiplier,” said CEO Chris O’Malley. “The next step is bringing Topaz to AWS,” he told IT Trends & Analysis, accelerating DevOps availability to “minutes instead of months. In some cases, it can take more than a year for competitive products.” The mainframe, or at least IBM’s version, has been a staple of IT for more than 50 years, and it shows no signs of disappearing. The numbers speak for themselves: 55% of enterprise apps need the mainframe; 70% of enterprise transactions touch a mainframe; and, 70-80% of the world’s corporate data resides on a mainframe. However the installed base appeared to be shrinking as newer, less-costly alternatives proliferated. Annual mainframe system sales have declined from a high of about $4 billion earlier this decade to $2 billion in 2016, accounting for just 3% of IBM’s total revenue (although the associated hardware, software and technical services accounted for nearly 25% of IBM’s sales and 40% of its overall profit last year). Apparently Big Iron is back in vogue. According to a new study, the global mainframe market is expected to see a compound annual growth rate of 2.58% between 2017-2021. In March it was reported that mainframes had reached an inflection point where they will either continue as a revenue-supporting mechanism or evolve into a revenue-generating platform. “IDC believes that the mainframe has a central role in digital transformation; businesses that do not take advantage of its broad range of capabilities are giving up value and, potentially, competitive advantage,” the research company stated. ‘The mainframe is not going away, but the way that you use it will change,’ noted Robert Stroud, Principal Analyst, Forrester, in a blog entitled DevOps And The Mainframe, A Perfect Match?. ‘Containers and microservices are coming to every platform, including the mainframe. Gradually breaking large monolithic applications into smaller services will help you transition to a containerized future that promises faster application delivery, greater scalability, and better manageability – regardless of the platform.’ A month ago IBM refreshed its z series mainframes with the LinuxONE Emperor II. “LinuxONE is a highly engineered platform with unique security, data privacy and regulatory compliance capabilities that doesn’t require any changes to developer or open source code, combined with...

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Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success
Sep28

Better Together: Vantara Plots IoT Success

Last week Hitachi ($81 billion annual revenues and more than 800 subsidiaries, with products including consumer appliances, electric power generation as well as IT) announced it was combining its former storage/IT business unit Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), together with Pentaho (BI software) and Hitachi Insight Group (IoT products and services), into a new unit focused on the operational technology (OT)/IT/IoT space. The new venture, Hitachi Vantara, also unveiled a number of products, services and partnerships focused on most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including Big Data and analytics, cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. So was this a bold move to combine assets that have a lot more potential upside in a US-based, IoT-focused business, or a desperate attempt to pump new life into stagnating segments? HDS may be the dominant member of the IoT troika, but with only a tiny share of a barely growing enterprise storage market, the grass looks much greener in an IoT market expected to reach between $1.2 to $2 trillion by 2021, with double-digit compound annual growth. The research data varies wildly, but it is certain that IoT is going to be a huge opportunity for the foreseeable future: –73% of executives are either researching or currently launching IoT projects; -manufacturing-based IoT connections grew 84% between 2016 and 2017, followed by energy & utilities (41%), transportation and distribution (40%), smart cities and communities (19%) and healthcare and pharma (11%); -the retail IoT market is forecast to surpass $30 billion by 2024; -the manufacturing IoT market is forecast to surpass $150 billion by 2024; -the IoT platform market (i.e. Vantara’s Lumada) is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16 billion by 2020; and, -project-based IoT services represented the highest percentage of market opportunity in 2016, and will gain nearly one point of market share to 56.7% by 2021, approaching $30.8 billion, with the Americas (52.2%) and EMEA (34.4%) substantially outperforming Asia/Pacific (13.4%) last year. It would appear to be very good news — at least potentially — for Hitachi, because it’s name was nowhere to be found in key players in the Persistence Market Research study. The featured vendors were: IBM, Microsoft, AT&T, Apple, Google, General Electric, Samsung, Comcast, Intel, Cisco Systems, Oracle, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Fujitsu, Qualcomm Technologies, Honeywell International, Accenture PLC, ARM, Amazon Web Services, SAP SE, Zebra Technologies, and Texas Instruments. From Data Storage to Business Outcomes Vantara represents a change in how Hitachi, or at least some of its IT assets, are presented, said analyst George Crump, StorageSwiss. ‘It does not want to compete with Dell and HP for storage deals. It wants to compete with...

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HDS Metamorphisis: From Storage 5th to IoT 1st
Sep21

HDS Metamorphisis: From Storage 5th to IoT 1st

LAS VEGAS: HDS is dead. Long live Hitachi Vantara. By combining its former storage/IT business unit (origins date back to 1979, but debuted as HDS in 1989) together with Pentaho (BI software acquired in 2015) and Hitachi Insight Group (IoT products and services, i.e. Vantara 1.0, formed in 2016: ), $81 billion Hitachi is repositioning HDS from a fifth-place finish in enterprise storage to first place in the operational technology (OT)/IT/IoT space. In addition to launching the reorganization at Hitachi NEXT 2017 in front of more than 2,000 attendees and more thousands online, the new and improved IoT business unit draped itself in most of IT’s — and business’ — hot buttons, including Big Data and analytics, cloud, containers, appliances and converged infrastructure. Although HDS was recently upgraded from Challenger to Leader in Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Solid-State Arrays, the hottest segment in enterprise storage, and the unit was contributing around 20% of Hitachi’s revenues, it has been on a downward trend the last couple of years. The overall enterprise storage market grew only 2.9% last quarter (to $10.8 billion), and fifth-place HDS accounted for only $413 million, down 3.8%, and well behind first-place HPE and second-place Dell EMC. A year ago it had 5.7% of the enterprise storage market revenues, while two years ago it had a 7.8% share of worldwide external storage revenue during the quarter.   While storage is stuck in commodity hell and HDS appears to be falling behind, IoT is experiencing exponential growth. Back in February Gartner predicted 8.4 billion things will be connected in 2017, up 31% from a year ago. That’s almost $2 trillion on endpoints and services this year, and we’re looking at 20.4 billion connected things by 2020,  with hardware spending expected to reach almost $3 trillion. IDC is not as optimistic, putting the IoT market at just under $1.4 trillion by 2021. That may be less than half of Gartner’s forecast, but it still represents an incredible opportunity for Vantara, which is pushing a more holistic approach than most of its competitors. “The true value of IoT is being realized when the software and services come together to enable the capture, interpretation, and action on data produced by IoT endpoints,” said Carrie MacGillivray, vice president, Internet of Things and Mobility at IDC.” The tagline for NEXT was ‘Lead What’s Next’, that was reinforced by another, more enduring Hitachi theme, ‘Double Bottom Line’, marrying the drive for business success together with social responsibility. The launch of Ventara “marks a monumental change for Hitachi”, said Hitachi, Ltd. president and CEO Toshiaki Higashihara, in his keynote on Tuesday. The company was...

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IBM Introduces Transparent Cloud Tiering for DS8880…

Archiving data from mainframe storage systems has been traditionally limited to an on premises physical or virtual tape tier. However, IBM has overcome that limitation with the introduction of Transparent Cloud Tiering (TCT) software that runs on DS8880 storage systems for z Systems. TCT widens the archiving storage targets to cloud environments and that brings the benefits of hybrid cloud with it, such as creating more and better options for managing both capital and operating expenses. Why IBM is doing this reflects the fact that data tends to change in value over time. Keeping older data on primary production storage is expensive not only in terms of storage costs, but also in terms of the resources needed to manage that data (such as for backup and disaster recovery). The solution is to archive less frequently used data to a different (and less expensive tier) of storage, but also making sure that the information can be easily recalled upon request. In the mainframe world, archiving is optimized only for the use of tape. That means an on premises solution, which while useful, lacks some of the benefits of a hybrid cloud solution that IBM TCT supports. Let’s consider that more closely. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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CA Levels The Playing Field
Jun01

CA Levels The Playing Field

SAN JOSE: CA Technologies has a storied past that began with the mainframe back in 1976, but it’s looking to reinvent itself as the architect of the ‘modern software factory’ which will make Digital Transformation a reality. It’s all about rapid — and frequent — change, levelling the playing field, and the keys include a focus on business agility, a high degree of automation and reducing time to market, all while securing that software lifecycle, said CA President and Chief Product Officer Ayman Sayed. DT is a business phenomenon, as much as it is driven by cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), big data and analytics (BDA), mobility, social media and security. But technology enables that phenomenon, he said. “Every business strategy is a technology strategy.” The good news for CA, is that while technology may be the foundation of DT and the next industrial revolution, this will be a software-driven revolution. “I think the time is right… our portfolio is well positioned,” added Sayed. The challenge is that many people still think of CA as it used to be 5-10 years ago, a vendor of legacy software, and not the supplier of the tools and methodologies for today’s emerging ‘app economy’. “The key thing is that we need to see that perception catches up to reality,” said Sayed. The company has been around for quite a few decades, established a reputation, and people see CA in a specific way that doesn’t actually apply to who it is today, agreed CA’s Otto Berkes, EVP and Chief Technology Officer. Management wants to drive awareness that CA has a new and interesting story to tell, one based on technology transformation and business transformation. The company’s current value proposition is helping its customers reinvent their businesses, transform their businesses, said Sayed. We do this by giving them the tools, technology and expertise to become the modern software factory, enabling them to build the modern software factory. CA is building in analytics, machine learning and intelligence, and security in everything it creates, he added. “Transform or die, disrupt or be disrupted. It’s an ongoing journey, not a checkmark,” explained Sayed Once you’ve established these elements of digital engagement there are lots of ways to transform the business, he said. “The new world is one that levels the playing field.” Technology and DT level the playing field, give you much larger scale and reach, added Sayed. There is a gap between current capabilities and desired objectives, said Berkes. “Enterprises don’t have efficient mechanisms for turning ideas into software,” but CA’s portfolio, built around agile, DevOps, and security, “an end-to-end value proposition,” delivers maximum value...

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