Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business
Sep14

Micro Focus HyPEs New Security Business

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (1859)   Last week Equifax, a supplier of credit information, reported that a recent data breach could affect up to 143 million consumers in the U.S. It’s even worse for businesses: according to Cisco’s 2017 Midyear Cybersecurity Report, only 66% of organizations are investigating security alerts, and businesses are mitigating less than 50% of attacks they know are legitimate. More than 150 years ago author Charles Dickens started off his novel ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ with “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”, and that line is still timely when it comes to cybersecurity and the new and improved Micro Focus. The new company officially debuted on September 1 with the ‘spin-merge’ acquisition of Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s software business valued at $8.8 billion, making it the world’s ‘seventh largest pure-play software company’, with annual revenue of $4.4 billion. Chris Hsu, formerly COO of HPE and EVP and GM of HPE Software, is now CEO of Micro Focus. Under the terms of the deal, HPE shareholders own 50.1% of the new company, which works out to approximately $6.3 billion, which is in addition to the $2.5 billion cash payment that HPE received. The deal involved the ArcSight security and Mercury Interactive application management assets, as well as the late and unlamented Autonomy Corp. plc, which HP acquired in 2011 for $11.1 billion (more than $16 billion for all three acquisitions), but ended up writing off almost $9 billion of the purchase price. According to Securities and Exchange Commission filings, HPE’s software business revenue in the 12 months through Oct. 31, 2016 were $3.17 billion. ITOM (IT Operations Management) comprised 61% of the revenue; Enterprise Security Products (18%); Information Management and Governance (16%); and Big Data Analytics (5%). Revenue for all products broke down to: 28% license, 9% software-as-a-service (SaaS), 50% maintenance, and 13% professional services. On Tuesday the company refreshed its expanded security portfolio, with new and enhanced offerings, including: -ArcSight Data Platform (ADP) 2.2 (GA October) brings native, realtime log parsing, security data enrichment and normalization into the innovative Event Broker for security operations that scales to any data volumes, building the power of ArcSight’s connectors directly into the Event Broker; -a new partnership provides IT and security teams with data that has been enriched for better visibility and customization within powerful search dashboards of Elastic; –ArcSight Investigate 2.0 (GA October) with built-in security analytics displayed in pre-defined dashboards that are powered by Vertica to provide actionable intelligence for front-line analysts; -Change Guardian 5.0...

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Vision 2016: Bringing Veritas into Focus…

Safely removed from the loving embrace of Symantec, and with new owner Carlyle Group’s financial clout at the ready, Veritas held a “coming out” (pun probably intended) party at its recent Vision event. Under the somewhat plain theme that “Information is Everything,” the event was fully focused on Veritas staking its claim – certainly its intent – to be(come) a data management platform. Before I make a few other points about the event, take a look at this video that has summary comments from my colleague Jason Buffington as well as me. And if you’d like additional insights from Jason (@JBuff) on the data protection angles of Veritas Vision, you can check out his vblog at http://bit.ly/jbESGvtas16a To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Quick take: Symantec buys Blue Coat

When former CEO Mike Brown left Symantec in April of this year, I wrote a blog about what I would do if I were recruited as Mike’s replacement. While one of my suggestions was for Symantec to resume M&A activities, I was really thinking about a strategy for filling in product gaps — perhaps Symantec could pick up LogRhythm to add a leading SIEM to its portfolio, or grab Carbon Black for endpoint security analytics and forensics. I never even contemplated a big-time merger, so I was as surprised as anyone when Symantec announced its plan to acquire Blue Coat. I’ve had a few hours to digest this news, and will certainly learn more in the days to come. Nevertheless, as an industry analyst, I can’t help but voice my early opinion on this deal. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Handicapping Enterprise Security Vendors

In the course of my average work day, I try to read all the cybersecurity news I can. I came across a very good article in Forbes that looks at the cybersecurity opportunities for companies like IBM, Cisco, Dell, and others. The article points out that the market for cybersecurity products and services is estimated at $77b today, growing to $120b by 2020. That’s a lot of firewalls, AV software, and identity tokens! Since I agree with some of the author’s points and disagree with others, I decided to post my own thoughts on my list of leading enterprise security vendors: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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EMC’s Federation: Built For Growth (2of3)

Those who consider EMC only casually or from a distance often find the company hard to understand from a business model and strategic direction perspective. EMC considers itself to be a federation and that is not a very familiar concept to most business observers. The base federation consists of EMC Information Infrastructure (EMC II – the company’s core storage hardware and software offerings), RSA (part of EMC II), VMware, Pivotal and the recently added VCE. Overall, EMC owns majority stakes in VMware, Pivotal and VCE. For more information, EMAIL davidhill@mesabigroup.com NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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