Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future
Apr20

Portability Is Essential In The Multi-Cloud Future

Pretty much everybody agrees the world is moving to the cloud — public, private (which includes managed as a service) but predominantly the combination of both (hybrid) — and the primary questions are what to move where, and when (how is also a huge concern, but while not easy, it’s really just fiddly bits). Four years ago Cisco started using the concept of the ‘world of many clouds’ to describe its customer-choice model, and earlier this month data and analytics leader Teradata unveiled database license flexibility across hybrid cloud deployments. There has been an “aggressive uptick in interest, if not deployment of public cloud” by the company’s global 1000 customers, said Brian Wood, Director, Cloud Marketing, Teradata. He told IT Trends & Analysis that over 90% of their customers plan to have hybrid IT by 2020, and “85% want to consume as a service.” The company has 100 customers in the multi-petabyte range, with the largest customer in the 90Pb range, so licensing becomes critical, smoothing out the investments, he said. With portability, “ it’s have your cake and eat it too.” This massive move to the cloud, with a mix of public, private, hybrid and on-premise resources means portability — data, software and licenses — is a critical component. Cloud lock-in is no more palatable than vendor lock-in, and while only one vendor, with a limited set of offerings — albeit a set of significant offerings — Teradata says its newest capability, an industry first, gives its data management solution for analytics the ‘very best value proposition.’ “Not only is the database license portable across the hybrid cloud options, but so are workloads, enabled by a common code base in all deployments,” said John Dinning, EVP and Chief Business Officer, Teradata, in a prepared statement. “This flexibility is a first in our industry and means that data models, applications, and development efforts can be migrated or transferred unchanged across any ecosystem.” Looking ahead reinforces the growing cloud-first future, although this cloud shift is not just about cloud, stated Gartner. “This cloud-first orientation will continue to increase the rate of cloud adoption and, consequently, cloud shift,” said Ed Anderson, research vice president. “Organizations embracing dynamic, cloud-based operating models position themselves for cost optimization and increased competitiveness.” Spending on datacenter systems is forecast to be $175 billion in 2017, growing to $181 billion through 2020. However, while DC budgets will be relatively flat, spending on cloud system infrastructure services (IaaS) will grow from $34 billion in 2017 to $71 billion through 2020, account for 39% of total spending on datacenter systems. The latest market data/forecasts demonstrate the headlong rush to...

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Dell Joins Cisco in Hyping DT Security
Jul27

Dell Joins Cisco in Hyping DT Security

Right after Cisco’s call for a threat-centric approach to securing the digital transformation (DT), Dell has released a survey finding that while everybody (97%; the other 3% were recovering from ‘Luddite Life’ celebrations) is investing in digital technologies, 85% say security teams can better enable DT initiatives if they are included early in the project, and 96% say ‘securing digital technologies poses challenges including lack of resources, risk of a security breach, finding the right balance between security and employee productivity, and loss of control.’ Dell’s survey of 631 US, European and Australian IT decision-makers with responsibility for security found an interesting disconnect: while 89% of respondents recognize digital transformation is happening in their industry, only 50% believe it’s happening in their organization. Yet 72% express active projects in mobile, with 68% involved in cloud projects and 37% in IoT, the usual suspects in formal digital transformation projects. This disconnect is because DT is not like other transformation initiatives, said Jackson Shaw, Senior Director, Product Management, Dell Security. Digital transformation tends to be a top-down strategic initiative, that starts initially at the board or C-level, he told IT Trends & Analysis. “DT as a process originates really high in the organization and the line of business really sees it as their slice of heavenly pie,” agreed Bill Evans, Senior Director, Identity and Access Management, Dell Security. One of the challenges that we see, where it happens organically from the bottom, that’s where security gets left out, he added. Strategic or not, DT can be derailed by security, said Shaw. While security often is seen as a barrier to digital transformation and brought into the process too late to make a meaningful impact, security teams can serve as enablers in helping the business adopt digital technologies when included early in the planning process, according to Dell. Security is at the heart of digital transformation, agreed Cisco’s Ben Munroe, Senior Manager, Product Marketing. Of necessity — and having absolutely nothing to do with the company’s core business — he maintained that “Security must start with the network.” A key reason why security is too often looking in at DT from the outside has to do with the traditional view of security as the Department of No, said Evans. “We see security as enabler… it has to step up and become an enabler, the Department of Yes.” “Digital transformation is bigger than just IT and security,” said Shaw. “It’s used by organizations to transform themselves, to become more customer centric.” DT can pay huge dividends, according to a survey commissioned by CA: 45% reported increased customer retention rates; while 44% also recognized...

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Analytics: Business Phenomenon With A Body Count
Sep08

Analytics: Business Phenomenon With A Body Count

A new study from Teradata provides more evidence that the total addressable market for business analytics is essentially everybody. Certainly for larger organizations, the survey indicates that analyzing data can lead to a “significant, measurable impact on revenues,” said Teradata’s Chris Twogood, VP of Product and Services Marketing. The clock is ticking, and America is currently losing the race, he added. “One of the biggest surprises for us… some of the international companies are getting more support from the C-suite than the North American companies.” Asia/Pacific was twice as ready to say big data and analytics are part of their competitive success, said Twogood. Teradata wanted to know just where the business analytics market is, i.e. are there certain companies leading the way, different characteristics, and what are the implications, he said, explaining why the company worked with Forbes Insights and McKinsey on the survey of 316 senior data and IT decision-makers in ‘leading companies’. The key finding: “if you’re not engaged in big data analytics or you’re just toying around with it, you’re going to be outpaced by your competition.” Over half of the respondents, 59%, consider big data and analytics either a top five issue or the single most important way to achieve a competitive advantage, and 90% report medium to high levels of investment, and about a third call their investment “very significant.”. Sandwiched between those two factoids was what I considered the most relevant finding: 66% report that big data and analytics initiatives have had a ‘significant, measurable impact on revenues.’ Teradata said the survey showed that big data is shaping the future and driving opportunities for innovation in three key areas: creating new business models (54%); discovering new product offers (52%); and monetizing data to external companies (40%). So what’s the holdup? ‘Cultural, strategic and operational hurdles await those that tackle big data and analytics without a fleshed-out plan and executive support.’ According to the survey, the roadblocks include: -just over half of respondents reveal that the idea of a data-driven strategy is not universally accepted in their organizations, citing adapting and refining a data-driven strategy as the single biggest cultural barrier; -44% cite putting big data learning into action as an operational challenge; and, -only 53% report that their companies’ big data and analytics capabilities are above par or best of breed; 33% consider themselves average, and only 6% say that they are underperforming compared with industry peers. While democratizing the data, making it more accessible throughout the organization is important, Twogood said the survey demonstrated that C-level support is essential. “This is a call to action to the C-level… we have to...

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EMC Dips Deeper Into The Shallow End of The Data Lake
Mar23

EMC Dips Deeper Into The Shallow End of The Data Lake

Barely a month after making its first big splash in the Data Lake, EMC is back at it with an all-in-one Big Data analytics solution — hardware, software and services – with availability and pricing to be determined later. The Federation Business Data Lake packages storage and Big Data analytics technologies from EMC Information Infrastructure, Pivotal, and VMware, together with services, to accelerate and automate deployment of Data Lakes and clear ‘the path for new insights and disruptive differentiation.’ It greatly simplifies the massively complex task of building a Data Lake and is designed for speed, self-service and scalability for the enterprise, enabling organizations to begin making better-informed business decisions using Big Data analytics, said Aidan O’Brien, Senior Director, EMC. “This is the industry’s first enterprise-grade Data Lake,” he said. It seems like everybody’s use case varies slightly, stated O’Brien. So what we’ve tried to do is to increase standardization and flexibility. No company has all the technologies required, i.e. EMC lacks a visualization component, he said, but what they’ve done is provide some ready-made apps, a data scientist in a box, that can be implemented in as little as seven days. For the more adventurous, there’s also a software developer kit. According to Gartner, a Data Lake is a collection of storage instances of various data assets additional to the originating data sources. These assets are stored in a near-exact, or even exact, copy of the source format. The purpose of a Data Lake is to present an unrefined view of data to only the most highly skilled analysts, to help them explore their data refinement and analysis techniques independent of any of the system-of-record compromises that may exist in a traditional analytic data store (such as a data mart or data warehouse). EMC gets more granular, defining the Data Lake as a modern approach to data analytics by taking advantage of the processing and cost advantages of Hadoop. It allows you to store all of the data that you think might be important into a central repository as is, and by leaving the data in its raw form, you don’t need a pre-determined schema or ‘schema on load’. Schema on load is a data warehousing process that optimizes a query, but also strips the data of information that could be useful for analysis. This flexibility then allows the data lake to feed all downstream applications such as a data warehouse, analytic sandboxes, and other analytic environments. It’s still early days for the Data Lake concept, but Suresh Sathyamurthy, Sr. Director, Product Marketing for EMC’s Emerging Technologies Division, said his company was the market share leader, even though...

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Teradata: The Fiddly Bits (& Bytes)

NASHVILLE: Big Data analytics and marketing applications specialist Teradata appears to be on a mission to single-handedly — with partners — make data-driven decision-making popular, as opposed to the very limited acceptance that now exists. In the last few weeks, and at this week’s Partner conference, it has been rolling out products, services and partnerships because today’s competitive battle field can be won or lost by analytics. This week the company made a number of announcements, including: -a data fabric (to be available late fourth quarter of 2014), enabled by QueryGrid, which turns multiple best-of-breed solutions   — i.e. Teradata-Database-to-Teradata-Database, Teradata Database-to-Teradata Aster Database —  into an orchestrated analytical ecosystem, weaving together multiple analytics, diverse data repositories, and disparate systems to provide business users a cohesive and uninterrupted analytic ecosystem; –Teradata Database advancements that deliver analytic performance and system efficiency through new memory and CPU optimizations, including query pipelining and new in-memory table structures; –Connections Analytics offers a new class of data-driven analytics for discovering relationships and influences between people, products, and processes. Teradata made a number of Hadoop-related announcements less than two weeks ago, including a substantial expansion to its Cloudera partnership. It covers ‘broad technology integration and development road map alignment, and a unified go-to-market, sales and support offering,’ and will see them optimize the integration between Teradata’s integrated data warehouse and Cloudera’s enterprise data hub offering to facilitate access to multiple data sources through the Teradata Unified Data Architecture. Other announcements included: -QueryGrid now orchestrates analytic processing of data between Teradata and Oracle databases, enabling Teradata data warehouse users to leverage data sitting in Oracle databases to enhance their analytics; –Teradata Cloud for Hadoop, an integrated cloud offering that will make it easier for companies to explore the uses and business value of Hadoop; and, –Teradata Loom 2.3, a data management solution with a browser-based interface for working with data and metadata in Hadoop, is available in two versions: Teradata Loom Community Edition is free, downloadable, and compatible with the major Hadoop distributions: Hortonworks Data Platform and Cloudera Distribution for Hadoop (a non-production version of is available as a separate software solution or pre-packaged with Hortonworks Sandbox and Cloudera QuickStart VM;  a free, production version, with selected features, will be available for download in November 2014). Given that Cloudera likes to take shots at Teradata, this may seem like an unlikely relationship, noted Nick Heudecker, Research Director, Gartner, but it highlights an important reality in the information management market. ‘Despite the hype, Hadoop isn’t replacing data warehouses. This hype has only confused the market and resulted in delayed adoption for both technologies. Hadoop remains largely application-centric, with...

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