The New Endpoint Security Market…

Venture capital investments in cybersecurity companies are aggressive these days but yesterday’s news was startling nonetheless. First, Cylance announced a round of $120 million led by Blackstone Tactical Opportunities. Cylance says that the funding will help it expand sales and marketing initiatives and extend its global footprint. Not to be outdone, Cylance archenemy CrowdStrike announced a round of $200m, led by General Atlantic and IVP, and now claims a valuation of more than $3 billion. Like its rival, CrowdStrike says that the new funding will go toward sales and marketing as well as product development. These two “unicorns” are not alone. Tanium and Cybereason have also enjoyed funding rounds of $100m while SentinelOne raised $70m in a series C round last year. Holy antivirus, Batman! Now all this VC investment seems a little crazy at first glance. After all, the entire endpoint security market is somewhere in the 5 to 7 billion-dollar range and its currently dominated by a cabal of vendors including Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro, and Webroot. Given this market reality, it’s fair to ask how the Sand Hill Rd. phat cats can justify this level of investment in a crowded and mature market. Yup, endpoint security investment is aggressive but there is some wisdom behind this VC strategy. Today’s endpoint security market no longer looks like the antivirus market circa 2008. Rather, it is transforming rapidly for several reasons: To read the complete article, CLICK...

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DEW17: It’s Mainly About DT… and IoT

LAS VEGAS:  In a preview of a plethora of pithy product pronouncements, Part 1 (PPPPPP1 or P61) I’ve taken the first set of Dell EMC’s announcements based on leading-edge hype, digital transformation (DT) and Internet of Things (IoT). The more mundane offerings like storage, appliances and cloud, have been relegated to Part 2, while a seemingly revolutionary new payment plan will get its own focus in Part 3. Only time — and the market — will tell if I got these right. However DT is the focus of both Dell EMC, and Dell EMC World 2017, so that’s where I’ll start. First, while there were DT-flavored announcements, i.e. Dell EMC Drives IT Transformation With the New 14th Generation of PowerEdge Servers and Dell EMC Powers IT Transformation with New Open Networking Products, there were no specific DT products and services announcements. That might be because digital transformation is more of a business phenomenon than a product or service that you can buy. It’s more about the people and processes; products and services are only a means to an end. The only DT-branded announcement, and IMHO that’s a stretch, is the upcoming 14th generation of the Dell EMC PowerEdge server portfolio that help customers drive IT Transformations. The company says it delivers innovation in three areas: a scalable business architecture; ‘intelligent automation’ via expanded APIs and the new OpenManage Enterprise console; and integrated security. Availability is scheduled for mid-year, i.e. real soon. If DT was more a premise or promise than a product, there were a number of IoT announcements, including those from Dell’s VMware subsidiary and Atos. The company bills itself as an ‘IoT heavyweight’, the industry’s ‘broadest IoT infrastructure solutions provider’, and has a ‘complete edge-to-core-to-cloud portfolio of infrastructure for IoT solutions.’ The VMware Pulse IoT Center is a secure, enterprise grade (IoT infrastructure management solution that will enable IT and operational technology (OT) teams to control their IoT infrastructure and things. Due out later this year as both a standalone solution by VMware and partners as well as a bundled offering via partners such as Dell EMC and others, it will provide IT and OT teams visibility and control across their IoT use cases, while offering peace of mind with security capabilities throughout the IoT value chain, stated Mimi Spier, vice president, IoT, VMware. The Atos partnership revolves around an IoT service management framework (Atos Codex IoT Services), that will enable customers to be in control and assure that all users ‘can continuously create value from their connected devices.’ Although very much a work in progress, the framework is available now, combining Dell EMC hardware and software...

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Veeam: nice guys still finish first

I just left Veeam’s analyst summit (in Napa, which is fantastic). Normally I don’t do analyst days (as we have legitimately smart analysts who do them), but I wanted to know more about this company who successfully latched on to the virtualization movement and never let go. Plus, did I mention it was in Napa? Suffice it to say that Veeam is one of those “once in 25 years” success stories. They use their own money, grow at an insane pace, print cash, and have become the envy of not only the “availability” world, but anyone in this generation of tech. And they do everything “wrong”. They are truly a distributed organization — Russia; Switzerland; and Columbus, Ohio. Yes, Columbus Ohio. Their founder and CEO (until today), Ratmir, is impossible not to like. They took on what is perhaps the most entrenched sector in all of IT (data protection), and dominated against all odds. They don’t have to answer to anyone — because they use their own money. They don’t have to rush to go public, for the same reason. They can afford to do things right. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Dell Ventures – Mobilizing Early Stage Innovation…

Venture capital and capitalists (VC/s) enjoy a legendary status in Silicon Valley and the broader technology industry. That’s partly due to the remarkable gains and spectacular wealth that some in the VC community have managed to achieve time and again. But those investments also qualify as the literal financial lifeblood of IT. Without VCs willing to take a risk, it is difficult or impossible to discern how companies, including Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook and countless others could have survived and thrived to change the modern world. But less well known in industry is corporate venture capital (CVC) investing where well-established vendors make their own bets on up and coming companies. To gain a better understanding of this corner of the IT financial market, we recently sat down for a conversation with Jim Lussier, currently the managing director and head of Dell Ventures. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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