HPE: Smaller Is Better
Nov09

HPE: Smaller Is Better

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) has been pushing a smaller-is-better strategy for the last few years, spinning off PCs and printers, services and software, and now it looks like it’s applied that strategy to its mission-critical server line. Superdome Flex, the follow-up to Superdome X, the server family that started the company’s RISC-averse transition from Itanium to Xeon, opens up a $6-8 billion market that HPE wasn’t able to address effectively, HPE’s Randy Meyer, VP & GM, Mission Critical Systems, told IT Trends & Analysis. When it comes to the mission-critical x86 server market, driven by database, Oracle and SAP HANA applications moving from Unix to Linux, there were only a couple of choices, he said. While the up-to-16-socket Superdome X does the job well, the problem was at the bottom with 4-socket entry-level systems, especially for customers who knew they were going to eventually need more sockets. “In the Superdome X form factor, you paid a lot for the infrastructure.” With Flex, HPE went modular, making it much easier — and affordable — for customers to grow from 4 sockets all the way up to 32. “All of a sudden you have customers saying this is really cool.” Meyer believes this will open up a “huge chunk” of the market, and the ability to scale up and down will appeal to large customers, as well as the previously untapped midmarket. Following a couple of slow quarters, server revenues climbed 6.3% year over year to $15.7 billion in the second quarter of 2017, while midrange server revenue shot up 19.6% to $1.5 billion, and demand for high-end systems tumbled 18.9% to $1.3 billion, according to IDC. HPE held on to top spot (21.3% of the market), but revenues slid 8.4% YoY to $3.3 billion, while second-place Dell (17.7%) posted 7% YoY revenue growth. x86 server demand increased 10.4% to $14.3 billion, while non-x86 servers declined 21.5% to $1.5 billion. “Demand for two-socket form factors continues to control a majority of unit shipments now and going forward as they are the sweet spot for density-optimized servers which are used in datacenters,” said IDC’s Lloyd Cohen, director of Worldwide Market Analysis, Computing Platforms. Gartner’s server numbers were lower: 2.8% YoY revenue growth to $13.9 billion, and a 9.4% marketshare decline for HPE. RISC/Itanium Unix servers plummeted 21.4% in shipments and 24.9% in vendor revenue, which at least did better than the ‘other’ CPU category, which is primarily mainframes, down a whopping 29.5% in revenue (and that’s after an infrequent IBM z Series refresh). HPE reported significantly better results for high-performance computing. For its latest quarter the company said revenue from the HPC...

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Fallout From The HP/Intel HPC Alliance?
Jul14

Fallout From The HP/Intel HPC Alliance?

HP has announced a High Performance Computing alliance with Intel to expand HPC in the enterprise. That’s good news for the dominant HPC and chip vendors, but one has to wonder how Intel’s other HPC OEMs, especially Dell and Lenovo, will react. While a wholesale movement to alternative processors like ARM and Power 8 (IBM) is doubtful, it would be logical for the competition to seek ways to level the HPC playing field. Under the terms of the deal, announced Monday at the International Supercomputing Conference in Frankfurt, Germany, HP is offering its HPC Solutions Framework based on HP Apollo servers, and will leverage Intel’s Xeon Phi processors, Omni-Path interconnect technology and the Enterprise Edition of Lustre. HP and Intel are also enhancing the capabilities at HP’s HPC Center of Excellence in Grenoble, France, and opening a new CoE in Houston. Bring together the two leaders creates a “two-plus-two-equals-six” arrangement, said Bill Mannel, VP & GM of Apollo Servers, HP. He told IT Trends & Analysis that this change in their long-standing relationship is not just being done from a product perspective. “We’re actually looking at this from a solutions perspective… specific industries… and specific workloads,” Given that HP’s recently formed business unit focuses on HPC and Big Data, it’s natural that the new alliance will also focus on HPC and Big Data, said Mannel. “There’s probably no CIO that doesn’t feel pressure to have some kind of Big Data initiative.” However, most of those Big Data initiatives fail. “Everybody’s feeling pressure to do something with Big Data and a lot of them don’t know where to go.” Mannel said everybody’s trying to get there, everybody’s trying to be successful and they’re finding that they need a lot more help. More and more customers are coming to us and wanting to engage with us not just from a hardware perspective, but from a solution perspective, he said. The alliance apparently got its start from a conversation between the CEOs – Meg Whitman and Brian Krzanich – as HP was beginning the process of splitting itself into an enterprise business and a PC and printer business. “So we did a deeper dive with our counterparts at HP to see if there was a fit,” said Intel’s Charles Wuischpard, VP and GM of the Workstations and High Performance Computing division in the Data Center Group. “HP is looking to double down on HPC. HP already does a lot already, as you know, and they see a lot of opportunity in traditional HPC and big data. The idea was that if we develop all-Intel solutions and work closely with HP using the...

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IBM/SAP Ink HANA Cloud Partnership

IBM and SAP announced a new premier partnership that aims to help customers quickly and securely run business-critical applications in the cloud. The SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud is immediately available as a service via IBM’s 40 cloud data centers and will eventually expand into every major global market. According to the two companies, the new service demonstrates their relative strengths: -SAP brings the power of real-time analytics via the in-memory computing capabilities of SAP HANA combined with the ability to run mission-critical business applications, like SAP Business Suite, on the SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud. -IBM brings enterprise depth and the open architecture of IBM Cloud Managed Services and SoftLayer – enabling customers to securely manage SAP workloads from trial to pro-duction on a consistent infrastructure, with transparency and control over where data resides. Customers should also benefit from the technology and services solutions offered by from both companies, including IBM consultants who offer industry-specific best practices. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IDF 2014: The Four “A’s” of Industry Standard DC Computing

Last week, while most of the world was mooning over the latest revolutionary iPhone launch extravaganza in Cupertino, a different sort of revolution was taking place in San Francisco at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2014. Amidst a host of other new and/or improved products and initiatives, Intel introduced the newest addition to its Xeon processor line for servers, storage, networking and workstations—the E5-2600/1600 v3 families based on Intel’s latest/greatest “Haswell” 22nm process. But there’s more to the chips than cutting edge manufacturing capabilities. According to Intel, the new processor families boost performance by up to 3x over the previous generation ES-2600 products, and also deliver world-class energy efficiency and enhanced security. To answer increasing demand for software-defined infrastructure (SDI) solutions, Intel has added telemetry features, including sensors and metrics for CPU, I/O and memory utilization. Those innovations will enable the delivery of SDI-based services with optimized performance, resilience and total cost of ownership. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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EMC Refreshes VMAX, VNX, Isilon, And Data Domain Lines

May 23, 2012: EMC isn’t letting the focus of its annual customer and partner event, EMC World, cloud its judgment about what enterprise customers really want: in-house storage. While there were a number of cloud-related announcements this week, there was lots of storage news, including the VMAX 10K, 20K, and 40K enterprise storage arrays; VNX unified storage enhancements; the combination of VPLEX virtual storage with RecoverPoint data protection; and new Data Domain and Avamar systems and software. According to EMC president and COO Pat Gelsinger, who spoke with InformationWeek just prior to the event, cloud-based storage “hasn’t replaced private storage by any means. Most of the volume is being driven by consumer services. Enterprise use is being driven by test and dev. People go, ‘It’s an easy way to experiment, but they don’t really do anything serious there.'” To read the complete story, click...

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