IBM, OpenPOWER and Gaining a Competitive Edge in HPC

High performance computing (HPC) represents a pinnacle of computational excellence that’s also amazingly cool for those of an IT bent. It isn’t just the systems themselves, though there’s much to consider there. What’s more remarkable and often more impressive is how HPC can enable flights of the imagination that find landing places in the real world. The effects of these excursions are often apparent to the narrowest of audiences. After all, the results of classified nuclear weapons research aren’t open to the general public but many other HPC-inspired advancements are. Plus, the same rules of commoditization that impact other IT markets hold true for HPC, too. So that HPC capabilities and applications that were unthinkable just a few years ago enable numerous commercial solutions and services today. Those same commoditization rules make HPC every bit as dynamic as any other commercial IT market, if not more so. That’s because HPC vendors and their customers are always looking for an advantage, a way to get ahead and achieve consistently leading edge results. At the same time, HPC is one of IT’s least sentimental practice areas. “What have you done for me today?” isn’t a cliché in HPC. It’s a mantra repeated daily, weekly, monthly, annually by scientists and research professionals on the hunt for the next big thing, and the bigger things to follow. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

SIEM Market Dynamics in Play

When I started focusing on the security market 14 years ago, the SIEM market was a burgeoning market populated by vendors such as CA, e-Security, Intellitactics, and NetForensics. In the intervening timeframe, the SIEM market has grown, thrived, and changed every few years. SIEM started as a central repository for event correlation for perimeter security devices. It then morphed into a reporting engine for governance and compliance. In a subsequent phase, SIEM became more of a query and log management tool for security analysts. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

OpenText to Buy Dell EMC’s Enterprise Content Division

The plan by OpenText, an Ontario-based player in the Enterprise Information Management (EIM) space, to purchase Dell EMC’s Enterprise Content Division, including Documentum, is an interesting deal for both firms though for substantially different reasons. In the case of OpenText, the deal represents a step forward in strengthening a leadership position in a range of EIM solutions and services. The sale also demonstrates how Dell Technologies is moving forward both strategically and financially after the close of its purchase of EMC. Let’s talk about that. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Oracle ZS5 Is Foundational for Oracle’s Data Cloud Future

At the risk of stating the blindingly obvious, we live in interesting times, not just for IT itself, but for the IT vendor ecosystem too. There’s divestitures, (re)spin-outs, and corporate combinations going on all over the place—think of HPE, Veritas and Dell/EMC respectively as some recent notable examples. Then there’s the cloud-focused crowd, and the on-prem-focused crowd…indeed, this can often be different product offerings from the same vendor. And then we have Oracle, not for the first time, marching to its own tune. And it could well be mellifluous for many. So, to start at the beginning: Just yesterday Oracle launched the 5th generation of its ZFS Storage Appliance, logically-if-unexcitingly called ZS5! As products go, it’s certainly impressive…up to 307 TB of flash cache (there’s also a version with up to 1.5 TB of DRAM) to support up to 9 PB of capacity, which means some real “oomph” on performance, including for the often-overlooked restore capabilities. And of course it comes with all the strength—whether that means resilience or completeness of advanced functions—that one might (un)reasonably expect. But I’m convinced the product itself is not the real story here: The “tune” that Oracle is composing is a whole orchestral symphony, not a concerto or a piece for, say, just a string quartet or solo instrument. What do I mean by this analogy, and why is this seemingly-good-but-straightforward storage product from Oracle part of a greater IT whole? To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

…Why Enterprises Are Choosing Dell… Over HPE

Pushing hard for competitive advantage is hardly unusual in business. In fact, it’s commonplace for many companies to attempt to advance their own interests by spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) about their competitors’ strategies and efforts. Common or not, some of these exercises go to extremes. A case in point: Ever since Dell announced its plan to buy EMC last October, HPE’s CEO Meg Whitman has tried to dump FUD onto the deal as if she were driving a manure spreader. Whitman decried the size and complexity of Dell’s plan, saying it would result in “chaos” and insinuated that financing the deal would “keep them from better serving their customers.” Whitman also said that Dell is “getting bigger, leveraging up, and mostly doubling down on legacy technology. While our strategy is to get smaller.” In fact, Whitman claimed that HPE’s spin-offs and “spin-sales” of underperforming business units, including PCs, professional services and application software have placed it “two years ahead of the game.” That’s strong stuff so it’s worth taking a look at organizations that literally aren’t buying it. Businesses, including HPE customers, aren’t just ignoring Whitman’s FUD. In many cases, they are actively purchasing solutions from Dell Technologies to replace their HPE data center gear. The following is a profile of one such enterprise that I interviewed to discuss the business and technology challenges it faced, and why it decided to invest in Dell Technologies’ solutions. Please note that the representative I spoke with, a technical lead in the company’s IT organization, asked that its name and location not be disclosed for practical and competitive reasons. I’ve honored that request. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More