Lenovo DCG and the Benefits of “Failing Fast”

IT industry vendors evolve in different ways and for different reasons but corporate acquisitions can affect that process substantially in both expected and unexpected ways. For example, purchasing new products and/or intellectual property can enable the acquirer to enter unfamiliar markets far quicker than if organic development were pursued. Such deals can also substantially bolster the buyer’s reputation, especially if it purchases a solid brand and carefully manages product quality and customer relationships. But virtually every deal encounters at least some turbulence related to customer- and technology-integration issues. How and how well a vendor negotiates those challenges should be points of interest for IT customers and partners alike. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Introduces Transparent Cloud Tiering for DS8880…

Archiving data from mainframe storage systems has been traditionally limited to an on premises physical or virtual tape tier. However, IBM has overcome that limitation with the introduction of Transparent Cloud Tiering (TCT) software that runs on DS8880 storage systems for z Systems. TCT widens the archiving storage targets to cloud environments and that brings the benefits of hybrid cloud with it, such as creating more and better options for managing both capital and operating expenses. Why IBM is doing this reflects the fact that data tends to change in value over time. Keeping older data on primary production storage is expensive not only in terms of storage costs, but also in terms of the resources needed to manage that data (such as for backup and disaster recovery). The solution is to archive less frequently used data to a different (and less expensive tier) of storage, but also making sure that the information can be easily recalled upon request. In the mainframe world, archiving is optimized only for the use of tape. That means an on premises solution, which while useful, lacks some of the benefits of a hybrid cloud solution that IBM TCT supports. Let’s consider that more closely. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Killing The Magic In Apple

Last decade Apple was largely known for a cadence of hit products. You had the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, and the iPad closing out the decade in 2010. Steve Jobs passed in 2011. From then on, we’ve had the Apple Watch and, most recently, the Apple HomePod. The Apple watch is nowhere near the hit the iPad was and realize that the iPad itself seemed to go into decline shortly after Steve Jobs passed. The HomePod is too early (surveys don’t look great for it at the moment but it is early) into the market but given it is running against the dominant Amazon Echo which does more for about half the price prognoses isn’t very good for this product which, like the watch, broke the model of creating something that Apple could make look like everyone needed one. At the core of this problem I think is a sharp pivot from a CEO who was a product guy and a CEO who is more of a process guy and a change in focus from product/customer, to Margin/Investor particularly large investors. Let me explain because Apple is hardly alone with this. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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HPE Discover-ing Its True Identity

This month saw the US version of HPE Discover in jolly old Vegas. Apparently – with apologies to R.L.Stevenson – Jekyll and Hyde are alive and well and embodied in Hewlett and Packard! Because, boy is it hard to figure things out as far as this venerable corporate IT behemoth goes. In my “ESG On Location” video from the event I try to get to an insight about HPE that is more nuanced than merely a summary of the contemporary newsfeed; I should ask you to view that video first to get a flavor of things in Vegas and then I will add a few more explanatory comments….. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Pure Gold: Flash Vendor Predicts 30%-Plus CAGR, $35-Billion TAM

SAN FRANCISCO: Pure Storage has made it to the big leagues, having outfought, out-thought and outlasted the hordes of competitors in the enterprise flash storage market, which is experiencing explosive growth in the rapidly emerging digital transformation/big data and analytics/Internet of Things world. No longer relegated to the ‘Others’ category, it is a top-five player that looks too big to buy (Dell EMC, like James Bond, proves you should Never Say Never Again, but an acquisition — or at least a suitable acquisitor — appears unlikely) and too small to thrive without some help, typically a significant barrier to entry like proprietary (and popular) intellectual property, large installed base or deep pockets. With both the $1-billion revenue plateau and its first quarterly profit within reach in calendar 2017, the Puritan elders — AKA its senior executives — are predicting even bigger things to come, like at least three more years of 30%-plus revenue growth, surpassing the $2-billion annual revenue mark by 2020. That prediction was just one of the items announced to more than 3,000 customers, partners and staff (with another 2,000 online, for a total increase of 300% over last year’s inaugural event), at this week’s Pure//Accelerate 2017. Unlike the overall enterprise storage market, which continues to see capacity shipment growth at the expense of revenue and margin growth, the flash market, especially all flash arrays (AFAs), is growing explosively — 48% in the first quarter. Sales were a little over $1.3 billion, with Pure Storage holding down fourth place with 12% market share, behind Dell EMC (29%), NetApp (21%), HPE (17%), and comfortably ahead of IBM (7%). “All-flash array is the only segment growing in the external storage market space,” said Jimmy Yu, Dell’Oro Group vice president, in a statement. “While the total market for external storage has contracted for the past two years, and will likely decline again this year, all flash storage system sales are reaching all new highs. We predict all-flash array revenue to grow approximately 40 percent in 2017 to reach nearly $7 billion while disk and hybrid storage system revenues decline about 14 percent.” AFA’s future is looking even brighter, according to both flash guru Jim Handy, GM of semiconductor research group, Objective Analysis, and Gartner. Handy expects a manufacturing breakthrough in high-capacity 3D NAND chips next year that will further lower AFA prices. Gartner is predicting that half of all data centers will only use AFA for primary storage by 2020, with the market growing to $9.67 billion. Pure believes the total addressable market for its faster solid-state storage arrays is $35 billion. Dave Vellante, chief analyst of Wikibon, agrees the...

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