HPE InfoSight Brings Autonomous DC (i.e. Skynet) Closer
Dec07

HPE InfoSight Brings Autonomous DC (i.e. Skynet) Closer

The upcoming termination of Meg Whitman’s reign is not the only Big Bang due out of Hewlett Packard Enterprise early next year: in January the drastically slimmed-down enterprise IT powerhouse will roll out a 3PAR-enabled artificial intelligence recommendation engine (InfoSight AIRE) that will take HPE closer to the autonomous datacenter, according to company officials. “Infosight is AI for the datacenter,” HPE’s Gavin Cohen, VP, Product and Solutions Marketing, Storage, told IT Trends & Analysis. “That’s something Nimble started building on from the start.” HPE announced the completion of its $1.2 billion acquisition of Nimble Storage in April, and while that significantly beefed up its flash and cloud storage assets, the company said it would be leveraging InfoSight across both its storage and server portfolios. Calling InfoSight the “crown jewels” of the Nimble acquisition, the AI power of the platform provides HPE and its partners with a big competitive advantage against any and all competitors, said Meg’s CEO successor-to-be (as of  February 1) HPE President Antonio Neri. “Nobody has this,” he said in a recent interview. The predictive analytics capabilities are sure to power dramatic reductions in storage total cost of ownership (TCO) for businesses of all sizes, he said. “It delivers the best performance with the best uptime and lowest TCO optimized for the specific workloads that run on the platform. The customer gets the best experience at the lowest cost.” Beyond storage are servers and ultimately the datacenter, and bringing AI and predictive analytics to the datacenter is not only necessary for protecting existing revenue streams, but essential to the autonomous datacenter. While we hopefully won’t get a Skynet, Terminator’s rise (and fall) of the machines, AI in the datacenter is coming quickly. By 2019, 40% of digital transformation initiatives will use AI services; by 2021, 75% of commercial enterprise apps will use AI; and the majority of adopters have seen quantified returns meeting or exceeding expectations. “AI is a positive force for change,” stated Mark Purdy, Managing Director-Economic Research, Accenture Research. “It has the potential to markedly increase growth rates and substantially raise economic output across industries, while helping organizations to more easily rotate to the new way of doing business.” A recent survey found that AI could boost average profitability rates by 38% and lead to an economic increase of $14 trillion by 2035. But all that remains in the future; today, we have AI-powered storage, or at least Nimble, and shortly, 3PAR, and the benefits are equally compelling. The AI and predictive analytics capabilities of InfoSight reduce the time spent troubleshooting issues by up to 85% and help to deliver greater than 99.9999% of guaranteed...

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Robotics: Is NVIDIA…That Truly Thinks Strategically?

Around a decade ago virtually all the tech companies, seeing Apple’s success with the iPhone and Google’s response with Android, were convinced the future was in mobile phones and almost everyone was wrong. NVIDIA, however, pivoted early shifting massive resources to autonomous cars and ended up becoming one of the few firms that wasn’t badly damaged by a failed mobile strategy. They have since been followed into this area by others, but Autonomous cars are just the tip of the iceberg, this same technology can be used in autonomous aircraft and robots. While other firms also have drone efforts, NVIDIA was the first to see the connection between the drones and cars and bridge the efforts so that both benefitted from what the other did. However, with robotics, it seemed that tech firms in general didn’t even think that this was a category they were remotely interested in even though it is likely at some point each of us eventually get one. Once again NVIDIA stood up this week with partner to create the software needed for these robots which are also connected to their autonomous car and aircraft efforts and all should benefit from this inclusive strategy. But it strikes me that NVIDIA is the only US tech firm that seems to be aggressively looking at where the tech market is going next and getting ahead of the curve as opposed to what others seem to be doing and following a peer’s lead into a new market. Let’s talk about that this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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No More Dealing with Infrastructure…

The most exciting announcement during AWS re:Invent for cloud computing infrastructure foundation was Fargate. There were a slew of new announcements and I don’t want to de-emphasize the other ones too much, but this one was the most interesting to me. First, a bit of background. There’s lot of confusion on VMs, containers, and functions. Here are the differences: The key thing is that the VMs allow a server to run as one big piece (OS + whatever apps are installed), containers allow applications (which includes providing microservices, but no OS, but the underlying system beneath the container layer provides the Linux interface) to run, and serverless is a place to run code (or functions). Each stage enables slicing a workload into smaller pieces. Fargate is a system that enables you to run deploy your containers on AWS, and do so in a way that’s just as easy as getting VMs from EC2. This allows developers to ignore the setting up of infrastructure. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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The Relevance of Networking at AWS re:Invent

This year was my first re:Invent and it was an impressive event. There were over forty-three thousand people in attendance and the show occupied a number of hotels along the Vegas strip. It wasn’t just that there were a lot of people there, it was that there were a lot of people who wanted to be there – after attending hundreds of trade shows and user group events you get to know the difference. There was a buzz and excitement at the show that reminded me of early VMworld and TechEd shows. Sessions were sold out and queues were long as people waited for the doors to open. All the attendees I spoke to had specific reasons for attending; many were in the process of moving to a cloud first strategy and were there to learn. Clearly the main point from the keynotes was to remind everyone that AWS is continuing to innovate and provide services to help organizations of all sizes transition to cloud by offering the greatest breadth and depth of capabilities for a cloud platform, thus, making it easier for organizations to make the transition to the cloud and ensure AWS has capabilities for all possible use cases… thus potentially expanding its already dominant forty plus percent share of the market. On the expo floor it was good to see a mix networking companies attending to help customers better understand how to connect to the public cloud. In fact, ESG research on network modernization indicates that the top impact that organizations have reported that public cloud computing services has had on their network strategy is that they’ve integrated their data center and WAN links to create a seamless network that connects on-premises and off-premises resources (38%). That is why it was important for companies like Cisco, Juniper, and Arista to be at re:invent to talk about how they can enable seamless connectivity from the data center to the cloud for hybrid cloud environments. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Dell EMC OEM – A Pragmatic Strategy for IoT

Vendors explore market opportunities in widely diverse ways, ranging from the “bet early and seriously” approach Amazon took in crafting, subsidizing and launching its Web Services platform to the “start late, run fast and typically fall on your face” efforts of HPE and others whose attempts to catch up to AWS in public cloud failed miserably. But a strategy often overlooked by vendors as preeningly self-obsessed as Birds of Paradise is to 1) avoid public displays of braggadocio, 2) pragmatically choose opportunities according to their potential commercial returns, and 3) organically develop and expand efforts as those markets evolve. Dell EMC isn’t the only vendor offering a variety of original equipment manufacturing (OEM) services and solutions. However, the steady gains that the company’s OEM group has enjoyed, particularly in the past half-decade, are worthy of respect. So, too, is how those efforts resulted both in Dell EMC profiting today and being well positioned to new evolving markets, like Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. A recent analyst briefing led by SVP Joyce Mullen, who leads Dell EMC’s OEM/IoT group, along with its Channel organization, provided insights into the company’s strategy, customers and solutions, including its new PowerEdge XR2 rugged servers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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