Virtual Instruments Acquires Xangati…

Almost two years ago we wrote our first report on Virtual Instruments (VI), a fast growing, analytics-driven performance management company with a strong focus on making infrastructure more efficient. We described the VI product portfolio which included “VirtualWisdom,” the company’s infrastructure performance management platform, and associated hardware and software offerings known as “Probes” (ProbeVM, ProbeSW, Probe FC and Probe NTAP). We also observed that the company was using “advanced correlation techniques, analytics and visualization to provide definitive and actionable insights on infrastructure/application behavior” using hardware appliances to offload systems from having to burn precious cycles gathering monitoring information. In essence, VI had created a separate performance monitoring/availability management/utilization optimization environment that has a very low impact on system operation and latency. Last year, we reported that Virtual Instruments had merged with Load DynamiX – adding a performance testing, validation and change management environment to its analytics-driven infrastructure management portfolio. With these combined facilities, customers are better able to understand and test application/infrastructure relationships – enabling them to significantly improve application performance, particularly as it relates to Fibre Channel storage. Since that acquisition, Virtual Instruments has expanded Load DynamiX functionality into network-attached storage with its new NAS Performance Probe – and will soon introduce and iSCSI Probe. VI customers have reacted favorably to this acquisition: for 2016 year to date, Virtual Instruments revenues are running at 122% of plan. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell Extends the Value/Use Cases for Thin Clients

Like many traditional IT products, PCs are in transition along with the customers they serve. Doomsayers who, beginning with the Apple iPad’s introduction in 2010, were quick to proclaim the “death of the PC” have been largely wrong. But at the same time, evolving markets and slowing sales have resulted in significant challenges for PC ecosystem and channel participants. What are PC vendors doing to address this? For many, a little bit of everything, including aiming at high value/high margin segments such as gaming and virtual reality systems, stretching the value of lower end systems by leveraging supply chain economics and manufacturer relationships, and making the most of complementary technologies, like new CPUs and GPUs, ultra-high def-displays, capacious memory and SSDs and high performance USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt connectivity options. Many of those technological innovations are also percolating into alternative PC form factors and the solutions, including thin and zero clients. This week’s introduction by Dell of its newest Wyse offering provides an interesting perspective on how this trend is progressing in those markets. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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How Dell EMC Is Displacing HPE Storage…

I’m doing a series of win/loss reports and one of the interesting trends is Dell EMC storage is replacing HPE storage pretty aggressively. I think this is showcasing the use of what is termed a “Halo” product in the consumer market to open the account up and showcase the better service experience EMC is providing. At the heart of this experience advantage is a number of things—a more stable and mature workforce, a realization that people are cogs but have intrinsic value as employees, and a customer loyalty measurement process and executive metric that currently leads the industry. Let me walk you through the case. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM’s Ginni Rometty – Innovation, Discomfort and Growth

One of the more unusual and impressive sessions at IBM’s recent World of Watson (WoW) customer and partner event in Las Vegas was the closing day keynote by the company’s chairman, president and CEO, Virginia “Ginni” Rometty. Why unusual? Because for many years, IBM’s senior-most leaders have seldom presented at its public-facing business conferences, mostly leaving keynote responsibilities to unit leaders or product, service and sales executives. In many cases, that was simply a matter of personal preference or reflective of the intense time and scheduling pressures that come with being IBM’s CEO. But Rometty has chosen a different course, especially since May 2015 when she keynoted at the first WoW conference and then a few days later the IBM Security Summit, both in New York. This year, Rometty keynoted at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas (a first for an IBM CEO), the World Health Care Congress, WoW and the Grace Hopper Celebration for Women in Computing (GHC). To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Goodbye SIEM, Hello SOAPA

Security information and event management (SIEM) systems have been around for a dozen years or so. During that timeframe, SIEMs evolved from perimeter security event correlation tools, to GRC platforms, to security analytics systems. Early vendors like eSecurity, GuardedNet, Intellitactics, and NetForensics, are distant memories; today’s SIEM market is now dominated by a few leaders: LogRhythm, McAfee (aka: Nitro Security), HP (aka: ArcSight), IBM (aka: QRadar), and Splunk. Of course, there is a community of innovative upstarts that believe that SIEM is a legacy technology. They proclaim that log management and event correlation can’t keep up with the pace of cybersecurity today, thus you need new technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning algorithms, and neural networks to consume, process, and analyze security data in real-time. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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