DT Success Is… Elusive
Dec21

DT Success Is… Elusive

Everybody needs it. Most everybody is trying to achieve it. And the majority of those who try fail to realize its benefits. It is digital transformation — AKA DT, DX or Industry 4.0 — the multi-trillion-dollar business phenomenon enabled by cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), big data and analytics (BDA), mobility, social media and security that is reshaping everything for the foreseeable future. Succeeding at DT is the next new normal, and the stakes are literally life and death, i.e. a 33% increase in speed to market; 40% increase in customer satisfaction; and 37% increase in new business revenue. On average, companies going digital expect to increase annual revenues by 2.9% and reduce costs by 3.6%, but businesses going all-in can achieve both revenue gains and cost reduction of more than 30% at the same time. So DT is an extinction-level phenomenom that is transforming all aspects of our lives, and while the stakes are high, the risks — and failure rates — are higher. The failure rates for unsuccessful digital transformation projects range from a low of only 70% to as high as 84%. The biggest DT barrier is cultural resistance to change, followed by legacy IT systems and retaining critical talent, respectively. “One of the things that our research and expertise consistently show is that shifting people and how they need to operate differently are where some of the big challenges are coming from, as more and more companies try to digitally transform,” said IDC’s Shawn Fitzgerald, research director, worldwide digital transformation strategies. Positioned as a Leader in IDC’s Worldwide Digital Transformation Consulting and Systems Integration Services 2017 Vendor Assessment, Accenture is also grappling with DT internally, as its more than 400,000 professionals visit more than 10,000 customer sites daily, said CIO Andrew Wilson. He told IT Trends & Analysis that organizations need to transform from old techniques and waterfall philosophies to much more horizontal processes and experiences. “You have to be much more real-time.” The service provider practices what it preaches, focusing on the new skills and training required to enable an increasingly mobile and dispersed workforce to make the most effective use of the latest technologies. Wilson said his company is working to connect employees through social collaboration tools like The Stream, Accenture’s version of Facebook, that enables employees to stay connected with colleagues and communities, post updates and share knowledge anywhere. It also uses video communications, including the CIO’s monthly talk show for employees that features interviews with executives from Accenture and alliance partners. A key component of the SP’s DT-delivery capabilities is called Accenture Digital — consisting of Accenture Analytics, Accenture Interactive...

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HPE Discover in Madrid (includes video)

Here is my summary video from HPE’s latest Madrid installment of its Discover user event series. It’s a little different from the usual ESG On Location video format inasmuch as I spent the vast majority of my camera time interviewing HPE execs and customers, rather than my ESG colleagues. The customer interviews were done for HPE and will appear on its channels over the coming weeks. Meantime, in this summary video you’ll find sample “snippets” from some of the HPE exec interviews (with full versions to follow soon), together with a comment from me about mega-events in general, and then specifically my key takeaway from Discover in Madrid. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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AMD Amps Up With Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition

AMD is executing amazingly well now in sharp contrast to the way they were a decade ago (and given Intel has had to discontinue their mobile, wearable, and maker efforts they seem to be out executing Intel as well now). One of the areas the firm has significantly enhanced is software and this is showcased by the release of the Adrenalin Edition of their GPU software suite. Increasingly only part of the gaming experience is assured by hardware, to get the most out of that hardware the control software that surrounds it must step in and do its part. I guess the analogy would be in a current race car where the telematics and software are increasingly providing the edge because the physical parts of the car are so tightly regulated and approaching theoretical performance limits. No regulations here, but we are getting amazing amounts of potential performance out of the current generation of graphics cards and making sure you get every ounce is the purpose of this free bundled offering from AMD. Let’s talk about some of the enhancements. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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…Who Owns Identity and Access Management (IAM)?

Mobility and cybersecurity. While those two areas may have very different roles inside an IT organization and business, they both play integral parts in identity and access management. Given that, I’m always getting asked, “Who owns IAM?” Today, IAM is touched by multiple IT roles, such as app developers, IT operations, and security. CISOs are getting involved as well, at least in oversight roles. That’s because where there are identity and access, or identity repositories, you also have security risks, and need common oversight and common policy. What’s more, it’s important for all of these IT groups to be able to communicate about these policies amongst themselves in order to help keep the company safe and protect against potential threats. In this video, my colleague Jon Oltsik and I sit down to talk more about who owns IAM, and how IT professionals are leaning in to protect the company. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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IBM’s …Road to Commercial Quantum Computing

The IT industry loves to talk-up cool new technologies. Though impressive, it’s typically half an exercise in PR and half self-referential backslapping. What is less discussed is the careful process and considerable effort required to bring those products and services successfully to market. It isn’t just a matter of beating the bushes for willing clients. That’s especially true in the case of unique technologies for which no appreciable market exists. You also have to engage able, energetic partners, and work to educate potential customers. Consider the iPhone which recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of its launch. What Apple has chosen to remember and highlight includes the legendary vision and P.T. Barnum-class promotional genius of its then-CEO Steve Jobs and its own remarkable skills in product and GUI design. What has arguably received less than its due are the efforts the company’s partners played in ensuring that success. Those include AT&T, the iPhone’s initial exclusive mobile carrier which did a decent job of dialing-up network capacity to feed growing bandwidth demands. More important, though, were the developers who populated the Apple Store with thousands and eventually millions of apps and services that helped define the iPhone and expand its capabilities. Their value certainly wasn’t lost on Google which made developer outreach central to its efforts around Android. That effectively stuck a stick into Apple’s spokes and made the smart phone market far more competitive and profitable than it would have been otherwise. The essential value of partner and developer efforts also cast light on the Q Network announced by IBM last week, and the role it is likely to play in the evolution and adoption of the company’s IBM Q quantum computing platform. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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