…Why [Dell] Premium Support Makes Sense…

While Dell Premium Support Plus likely sets the bar now regarding support programs, they make sense for PCs regardless of who you buy from. They assure you get a better experience, they get your PC back to you in the shortest time possible (or replaced), and, increasingly – as with Dell’s program – they will be able to correct problems before you even know you have them, substantially reducing time and lost work. In the end PC support programs (and I would include their peers in terms of extended warranties for complex appliances) perform a valid service and the most important benefit remains that you’ll likely be happier with your purchase and the related vendor if you get one. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Security Operations Spending and ROI

ESG recently surveyed 412 cybersecurity and IT professionals asking a number of questions about their organization’s security analytics and operations. Overall, security operations are quite difficult, many organizations complain about too many manual processes, too many disconnected point tools, and a real shortage of the right skills. These issues can lead to lengthy incident detection and response cycles or worse yet, damaging data breaches. Just ask Equifax. To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

IBM LinuxONE: A Strategy Refinement

Clabby Analytics has argued for years that IBM needs to do a better job of explaining which workloads belong on which servers (x86, Power Systems, mainframes). Our primary argument has been that microprocessors process workloads differently; and systems are designed differently – meaning that workloads perform better when placed on systems that are best suited to process them. IBM has traditionally resisted providing such guidance, leaving sales teams and customers/prospects to work out which workloads belong on which processors/servers. Last year, we took it upon ourselves to publish this report in which we discussed which workloads belong on LinuxOne vs. x86 servers. Robert Francis Group also published a similar report. IBM, on the other hand, continued to focus its sales efforts on server consolidation and the price advantages LinuxONE had over distributed x86 server environments (upwards of 30% cost savings for certain workloads). This year, IBM seems to have gotten the message: to further increase sales of LinuxONE its going to have to do some workload positioning work. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

[IBM LinuxONE]… Modernizing the Mainframe and…

IBM’s new LinuxONE systems are starting out of the blocks quickly with Secure Service Container technologies that will help customers adopt, deploy and manage maximally secure Docker EE and CaaS solutions. The new LinuxONE platforms also deliver the goods in terms of heightened performance and scalability. Overall, these latest generation LinuxONE offerings richly deserve their Emperor and Emperor II designations, and spotlight the value that continuing, evolutionary platform modernization offers to IBM and its customers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

Read More

Apple Announcements: Good for Businesses?

Apple tends to lean heavily in towards the everyday consumer and not speak to the potential value to businesses. It feels a bit like they have so much trust in their fanbase that Apple automatically assumes that their technology will get pulled into businesses without having to address the business market. Some may call this approach arrogant and others would call this brilliant, but the fact remains that we have witnessed from day one of the Apple iPhone that appealing to consumers and application developers has created an automatic shoo-in into the business. ESG research consistently shows that end-users are creating a significant push for business to support Apple devices (personal and corporate owned). To read the complete article, CLICK...

Read More

And Now For Something Completely Different… And This Time We Mean It

Just days after unloading the majority of its software business HPE reported better-than-expected financial results, including $8.2 billion in revenues. “Execution continued to improve and our profitability increased over last quarter as we reduced costs across the organization and we successfully closed the spin merge of our software business late last week,” said CEO Meg Whitman during the earnings call. “With that milestone behind us, we are off and running.” Whitman attributed the “strong Q3 performance” primarily to better execution and a “compelling portfolio”, i.e. core server revenue was up 13% year-over-year, 200% growth in HPE SimpliVity hyperconverged offering (albeit off a small base), 30% year-over-year all-flash storage growth (driven by Nimble), and continued success with Aruba, including 30% growth in wireless LAN solutions. She also announced the intent to acquire Cloud Technology Partners, which helps Fortune 500 customers move to a cloud, build new cloud-based solutions and manage their cloud environment. Of course it wouldn’t be HPE without some controversy, and this time it was the stories circulating about Whitman jumping ship to Uber. Her explanation during the earnings call left something to be desired: she said she was called in late to be interviewed for the CEO position but “in the end that wasn’t the right thing.” She stated that there is lots more work to do at HPE to make it successful and “I actually am not going anywhere.” At least until the next time. The company was generating close to $120 billion annually just five years ago, and under Whitman’s guidance the company split into two — HP (PCs and printers) and HPE (enterprise) — and spun-merged software and services to shrink HPE down to a still significant, but significantly smaller $30-billion powerhouse. HPE is a Jekyll and Hyde, difficult to figure out, according to Mark Peters, ESG Practice Director and Senior Analyst (Storage), Enterprise Strategy Group. In June he noted that the company’s direction is becoming clearer. Whitman said things were getting easier, with “nowhere left to hide.” That’s no longer the case, said Whitman in a post-earnings call. “Now we can see Hewlett Packard Enterprise on a go-forward basis with perfect clarity.” The proof is in the performance of high-performance computing, Synergy, Simplivity, and Nimble all-flash arrays, she added. “What we have done, if you pull the lens all the way back,” said Whitman, “is to focus on higher-growth, higher-margin products, while stabilizing the core.” Software continues to be critical, but HPE’s focus is on system software, not the application software spun-merged with Micro Focus. “We are focused, though, on moving hard to software-defined infrastructure, with a stack that is quite modern, including...

Read More