Whatever Hyperconvergence Is or Isn’t, It Is Hot!
Aug04

Whatever Hyperconvergence Is or Isn’t, It Is Hot!

HP is expanding its hyperconverged infrastructure portfolio with the 2U, 4-node ConvergedSystem 250-HC StoreVirtual (CS250) appliance. Designed for virtual desktops and remote office productivity, as well as offering an easy path to hybrid cloud, it is ‘configurable in minutes for nearly half the price of competitive systems.’ “We’re focused on bringing more choice to our customers,” said Rob Strechay, Director, Product Marketing and Management, Software-Defined Storage, HP. The 4-node appliance (the starting price initially quoted is apparently now under review) will ship on August 17, while the 3-node CS250 with Foundation Carepack and VMware vSphere Enterprise, starting at a list price of $121,483, will ship on September 28, he told IT Trends & Analysis. Back in December the company unveiled its Helion CloudSystem CS200-Hyper-Converged StoreVirtual and ConvergedSystem 700. In June it introduced its next CI, the Composable Infrastructure (API), intended to support a new class of infrastructure that will be “composable”, built to fit the specific needs of an application or workload that will run on it. While HP’s initial foray into HCI nine months ago exceeded expectations, Strechay said customers indicated they were looking for “simpler, lower-cost solutions that had better performance”. The CS 250 allows customers to tailor the system with a choice of up to 96 processing cores, a mix of SSD and SAS disk drives, and up to 2TB of memory per 4-node appliance, double that of previous generations, and includes three 4TB StoreVirtual Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) licenses delivers multi-site business continuity by leveraging the system’s ability to flexibly replicate data to any other HP StoreVirtual-based solution. The appliance is pre-configured for vSphere 5.5 or 6.0 and HP OneView InstantOn, with daily management from VMware vCenter via the HP OneView for VMware vCenter plug-in. The system will also be cloud-ready, at least for HP’s Helion, said Strechay. While definitions vary, hyperconvergence appears to be a type of infrastructure system with a software-centric architecture that integrates compute, storage, networking and virtualization resources and other technologies in a commodity hardware box supported by a single vendor, and enabling cloud-like economics and scale without compromising the performance, reliability, and availability (i.e. Nutanix and SimpliVity). Unlike HCI, HP’s CI, or converged infrastructure – not to be confused with HP’s other CI, composable infrastructure – is a mix of compute, storage, networking and virtualization resources and other technologies – from two or more vendors (i.e. Cisco and EMC). “There is no one-size-fits-all solution for infrastructure,” said Manish Goel, SVP and GM, HP Storage, in a prepared statement. “This is why HP continues to offer flexible and interoperable solutions based on HP StoreVirtual technology to help our customers lower costs...

Read More

VMware… Bonneville: Containing the Container Contagion?

Containers, Docker, Kubernetes. What do all of these things have in common? From VMware’s perspective, they represent an existential threat to their hypervisor world order. Enter “Project Bonneville” – a VMware initiative to maintain the vSphere order of things by intertwining the roles of containers and VMs on server infrastructure. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE Share this:MoreEmailPrintShare on...

Read More
IoT Will Change Everything
Jul29

IoT Will Change Everything

Depending upon your perspective, the Internet of Things (and its accomplices, Big Data and analytics) is: one of the cornerstones that tomorrow’s organizations – public and private – will rest on; the next big revenue generator for the providers of IT products and services; or a minefield that will have to be navigated too-quickly and with too-few resources by CIOs, CISOs, CTOs and their IT minions. Regardless of your perspective, IoT will change everything, and that change is already well underway. “IoT is just a new label for something that has been around for many years,” said John Whittaker, Executive Director of Product Marketing, Information Management, Dell Software. He told IT Trends & Analysis that we’ve been doing sensors and data analytics for decades, but what’s new are the scale – the growing amount of sensors, devices and data, and how they can be leveraged for business value. “It’s almost as if a flood of imagination has emerged on the playing field and things that we couldn’t even manage a year ago are totally doable.” Even before IoT showed up organizations were driving this leveraging of data, and driving the need to become even more data driven, said Whittaker. “IoT is kind of just the next wave of that.” And that wave will transform how we work, play and live, especially work. “You’re going to see it change business in a fundamental way.” The IoT numbers range from the fantastic to the unbelievable, and are trending more to the latter than the former: -the worldwide IoT market will grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020 with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%; -the Industrial Controls and Factory Automation market is projected to reach $301.9 billion by 2020, from $171.2 billion in 2013, with a CAGR of 8.53%; -the Industrial Control System (ICS) security market is expected to grow to $11.29 billion by 2019, at a CAGR of 7.6% –building IoT is expected to be worth $76 billion by 2020; -telematics will continue to outperform all other M2M (machine-to-machine) markets over the next five years (over $40 billion by 2019, doubling the size of today’s market), in revenue terms, with one in five passenger vehicles connected globally by 2019; -China Mobile had over 43 million IoT/M2M SIMs at the end of 2014, making it the largest IoT/M2M player globally; -the smart transportation market to grow from $46.72 billion in 2015 to $138.76 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of 24.3% from 2015 to 2020; -72.1 million wearable devices will be shipped in 2015, up 173.3%, and volumes are expected to experience a CAGR...

Read More

Cybersecurity Technology Integration Changes Everything

Yup, I’ve increased my rants on this topic lately, but I’ve actually been preaching this message for a number of years. Cybersecurity technology integration activities remind me of what happened in the 1990s when departmental applications gave way to big ERP systems from Baan, Oracle, and SAP. This was a difficult transition, but organizations that persevered benefited from improved data analytics, real-time decision making, and new types of automated business processes. CISOs are clearly looking for similar results. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE Share this:MoreEmailPrintShare on...

Read More

IBM: Solving the Cloud + Analytics Equation

IBM’s push into cloud services was sparked by its acquisition of SoftLayer in early 2013, a privately-held cloud and web SP whose 21,000+ corporate clients included a large majority of global S&P 500 companies. Combining its own data centers with SoftLayer’s gave IBM over two dozen hosting facilities worldwide, a number it has steadily grown since then (there are over 40 as of this writing, with more planned for specific overseas markets). The company uses those data centers to deliver numerous public, private and hybrid cloud solutions, including infrastructure-, platform- and software-as a service (IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS). Not surprisingly, last year IBM was ranked #1 in IDC’s first market research study of enterprise cloud vendors. The survey asked representatives from more than 400 companies with 1000+ employees to rank Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud vendors according to their quality of service/availability, speed of provisioning, simplicity and overall costs. IBM garnered 35% of first place votes, placing it well ahead of competitors, including Amazon, Cisco and Google. How about analytics? Over the past decade, IBM has invested over $25 billion in analytics and big data via acquisitions of key companies, like Cognos, SPSS, Coremetrics, Netezza, StoredIQ and Cloudant. Plus, the company has developed notable related projects, including its Watson Analytics systems and BlueMix development platform, and made continuing investments in analytics-related open source efforts, like Hadoop and Apache Spark. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT Review. Share this:MoreEmailPrintShare on...

Read More
SDN/NVF A Work In Progress… And What Progress!
Jul28

SDN/NVF A Work In Progress… And What Progress!

The math is simple: mobility plus Big Data plus the Internet of Things/Everything plus analytics mean networks – datacenter, cloud and at the edge – must handle bigger workloads faster, and IT budgets can’t even come close to addressing these requirements with current technologies. Which brings us to this week’s OpenDaylight Summit, where software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV) will be trumpeted as the technologies that can solve this equation. Whose vision(s) of SDN and NFV will prevail is still very much in question, but what isn’t is the need, and the progress that has been made so far. There are four use cases for SDN/NFV, said Neela Jacques, Executive Director, OpenDaylight, in a phone interview with IT Trends & Analysis. The first is visibility and a better level of unification and orchestration, and while it’s the ‘least sexy’, it represents the biggest opportunity over the next 3-4 years. Customers “are frustrated with existing network management”. The other three use cases are: “trying to do real time management of your network, which is closest to what we consider traditional SDN”; NFV; and the fourth is cloud. Each of these use cases bleed into each other, he said. “At the same time that SDN and NFV are coming up, you’re seeing a shift from proprietary to open-based solutions.” Which leads us to ODL. ‘OpenDaylight is a highly available, modular, extensible, scalable and multi-protocol controller infrastructure built for SDN deployments on heterogeneous multi-vendor networks. In English, instead of jargon, OpenDaylight is meant to handle any level of networking with pretty much any software or hardware. With top backers such as Brocade, Cisco, Intel, and Juniper, OpenDaylight has the business support needed to back up its technical boasts.’ Back in May Jacques stated that the networking industry has embraced open source as the right path forward for SDN, and that OpenDaylight has become the industry’s “de facto standard” open source SDN project. There are over 300 developers working across company lines to deliver a common and interoperable SDN and NFV platform that anyone can see, contribute to and use. ODL members include Brocade, Cisco, Dell, HP, Intel, IBM, Ericsson, Huawei, Oracle, NEC, Microsoft and VMware. A month ago ODL announced Lithium, its third open SDN software release. It also announced the OpenDaylight Advisory Group (AG), consisting of enterprise, telco and academic users who will provide technical input to the OpenDaylight developer community. Foundational members include representatives from Telefónica I+D; AT&T; Orange; CableLabs; JArizona State University; Comcast; Caltech; China Telecom; Nasdaq; Deutsche Telekom; T-Mobile; and China Mobile. According to recent numbers from IHS Infonetics: -the global NFV hardware, software and services...

Read More