Robotics: Is NVIDIA…That Truly Thinks Strategically?

Around a decade ago virtually all the tech companies, seeing Apple’s success with the iPhone and Google’s response with Android, were convinced the future was in mobile phones and almost everyone was wrong. NVIDIA, however, pivoted early shifting massive resources to autonomous cars and ended up becoming one of the few firms that wasn’t badly damaged by a failed mobile strategy. They have since been followed into this area by others, but Autonomous cars are just the tip of the iceberg, this same technology can be used in autonomous aircraft and robots. While other firms also have drone efforts, NVIDIA was the first to see the connection between the drones and cars and bridge the efforts so that both benefitted from what the other did. However, with robotics, it seemed that tech firms in general didn’t even think that this was a category they were remotely interested in even though it is likely at some point each of us eventually get one. Once again NVIDIA stood up this week with partner to create the software needed for these robots which are also connected to their autonomous car and aircraft efforts and all should benefit from this inclusive strategy. But it strikes me that NVIDIA is the only US tech firm that seems to be aggressively looking at where the tech market is going next and getting ahead of the curve as opposed to what others seem to be doing and following a peer’s lead into a new market. Let’s talk about that this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Dell EMC OEM – A Pragmatic Strategy for IoT

Vendors explore market opportunities in widely diverse ways, ranging from the “bet early and seriously” approach Amazon took in crafting, subsidizing and launching its Web Services platform to the “start late, run fast and typically fall on your face” efforts of HPE and others whose attempts to catch up to AWS in public cloud failed miserably. But a strategy often overlooked by vendors as preeningly self-obsessed as Birds of Paradise is to 1) avoid public displays of braggadocio, 2) pragmatically choose opportunities according to their potential commercial returns, and 3) organically develop and expand efforts as those markets evolve. Dell EMC isn’t the only vendor offering a variety of original equipment manufacturing (OEM) services and solutions. However, the steady gains that the company’s OEM group has enjoyed, particularly in the past half-decade, are worthy of respect. So, too, is how those efforts resulted both in Dell EMC profiting today and being well positioned to new evolving markets, like Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. A recent analyst briefing led by SVP Joyce Mullen, who leads Dell EMC’s OEM/IoT group, along with its Channel organization, provided insights into the company’s strategy, customers and solutions, including its new PowerEdge XR2 rugged servers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Cisco Moves Virtual Assistant into The Office

Well it was due to happen. First we had Siri and Cortana on our phones and PCs, then Alexa invaded our homes and now Cisco is pushing their Spark Assistant into offices and I’m kind of surprised why it took so long. We are about to be up to our armpits in digital assistants, but that isn’t a terrible thing. You see—up until now—we have largely been forced to learn how to communicate with the computers and systems we interface with. But what digital assistants do is they start to bring these systems back towards us. In short, this is the beginning of machines learning how to work with us. I think you could argue that having to learn how to work with someone else puts them in a superior position, the same goes for machines. This past practice kind of made us their servants, where it should have always been the other way around—or, at least more of a peer relationship. This is a major step into creating far better human/machine interfaces and a major step toward a far higher level of efficiency and customer satisfaction with the products we will interface tomorrow. Let’s chat about that this week. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Charts Multi-Cloud Progress

Though the tech industry is subject to consistent and considerable disruption it’s hard to think of a more fundamentally disruptive technology than cloud computing. Why do I say that? For three reasons: First, because the success of early cloud movers and shakers (especially AWS), enabled businesses and consumers to effectively sidestep IT powers that be, including system and software vendors. In addition, cloud takes advantage of compute infrastructures developed, implemented and managed by companies that mainly do business with ODM manufacturers, putting further pressure on traditional enterprise vendors. Finally, by essentially outsourcing IT functions to cloud service providers (CSPs), organizations also cut back engagements with IT services professionals and organizations. Despite those and other challenges, it isn’t impossible for mainstream vendors to succeed with cloud initiatives. In fact, IBM moved forcefully into cloud computing with numerous, continuing strategic investments and initiatives. It also made cloud one of its five Strategic Imperatives (along with analytics, mobile, social and security), and announced in its most recent earnings call that IBM Cloud drove $15.8B in company revenues over the last 12 months. On November 1-2, the company hosted media and analyst events in New York City to detail its cloud-related efforts and progress. Following are a few thoughts on what I saw and heard there. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Advances Cluster Virtualization…

On the classic Groucho Marx quiz show You Bet Your Life if a contestant accidently said the “secret word” of the day, he or she would win a prize. There’s no prize included in this commentary, but the secret word of the day is virtualization, especially as it relates to IBM’s new HPC and AI solutions. IBM defines virtualization as “A technology that makes a set of shared resources appear to each workload as if they were dedicated only to it.” IT is very familiar with this concept, what with operating system-level virtualization, server virtualization, network virtualization, and storage virtualization all continuing to permeate more and more through computing infrastructures and the collective consciousness. So, it should come as no surprise that IBM is advancing the concept of cluster virtualization in its latest announcement, tying it closely to cloud and cognitive computing. IBM’s cluster virtualization initiative combines products from its Spectrum Computing family, namely Spectrum LSF, Spectrum Symphony, and Spectrum Conductor, along with overall cluster virtualization software (Spectrum Cluster Foundation) to manage the whole process. And that includes the storage that is delivered through IBM Spectrum Scale, another member of the IBM Spectrum Storage family. The goal of this approach is to automate the self-service provisioning of multiple heterogeneous high-performance computing (HPC) and analytics (AI and big data) clusters on a shared secure multi-tenant compute and storage infrastructure. Doing so delivers multiple benefits to numerous technical computing end users, including data scientists and HPC professionals. The announcement focuses on these products: IBM Spectrum LSF, IBM Spectrum Conductor, and IBM Spectrum Scale. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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