IBM Z Systems Software…

The interactions of computing software and hardware have long provided one of the best examples of truly synergistic relationships. Without hardware, software code is a mass of commands to which nothing listens. Without software, computers (especially enterprise systems) are little more than expensive, ungainly doorstops. However, working together they can make magic greater than the sum of their parts. Despite those...

Read More

Cisco and Collaboration

I’m at C-Scape, Cisco’s big analyst event which is held during Cisco Live, this week. One of the more interesting sessions was by Jonathan Rosenberg who is the VP and CTO of Cisco’s collaboration business. What caught my attention is that he opened with Metcalf’s law, which states that the value of a network is the square of the number of people on the network and he suggested this law also applied to communications tools. The reason...

Read More

Lenovo Wants to Simplify Conference Room Collaboration…

Equipping a conference room used to be really easy. You’d specify a speaker phone for the room, maybe select a couple of white boards and a flip chart, specify a conference table and chairs and that’d be about it. Video conferencing attempted to disrupt this several times, but a lack of compatibility, poor ease of use, and extreme expense tended to keep it from getting to true critical mass. The bigger problem was the systems tended...

Read More

IBM, NVDIA, Oak Ridge Labs and the Summit of Supercomputing

Supercomputers and other top-end high performance computing (HPC) installations have long defined and delivered the bleeding edge of compute performance. However, the underlying systems in those projects often reflect and portend broader changes in the commercial IT marketplace. That was certainly the case during the steady move away from the proprietary technologies and highly customized systems that once ruled supercomputing toward...

Read More

Intel Makes AI Understandable and Accessible…

Though they populate an industry that prides itself on tackling and solving complex puzzles, many IT vendors prefer simplistic story-telling. That’s partly due to simplicity being easier to sell than complexity, even if it fails to address many or even most of the issues related to complicated engineering efforts. But simple tales also feed the industry’s love of self-promotional mythologies, including the triumph and massive...

Read More