HP Defines Value of Doing Well By Doing Good

This week I was at HP’s Accelerate Executive Forum in Las Vegas. This is basically an HP Channel event and HP LOVES its channel. This is refreshing because, over the years, I’ve been brought in on a number of channel problems and they generally come down to the firm either abusing or ignoring their channel even though that channel accounts for more income than they can afford to lose. Well, at this event, the number of times HP reached out to their channel, highlighted that arrogance was a bigger concern than competitors, and drove home the point (right out of Dion Weisler, their CEO’s, mouth) that HP is driven by their channel was record breaking. But one other thing struck me. In a world where we are questioning whether our technology companies and CEOs are acting against us, HP also stood out as a company with heart doing things aggressively to make the world a better place. Let’s take a break from our concerns about Facebook and Google and talk about another company that is doing well by doing good. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Intel.. Taking Security to the Silicon Level

When it comes to digital security, the past year or so has delivered multiple lessons with a single conclusion: that whatever people, including individual consumers to business organizations to the IT vendors who serve them, have done or are doing regarding IT security, it isn’t enough. Taken in total, the situation may appear hopeless, but it sets the scene for the new silicon-level security technologies and initiatives that Intel announced this week at the RSA 2018 conference. The problem(s) with security The problems dominating security are two-fold. First, computing endpoints, systems and networks have become so complex that the industry’s decades-long approach of building/promoting numerous individual specialty solutions is at the breaking point in terms of working properly and meeting clients’ needs. Customers themselves bear at least part of the blame for these failures. Not only are most unwilling to learn or do what’s necessary to secure their devices against cybercriminals and exploits, but they also expect those products to work without any impact on performance and functionality. That can be a fatal combination, at least when it comes to protecting identity, financial and other assets. The other problem is that the cyberthreat landscape is growing exponentially. The situation is no longer limited to the prototypical evil hackers long-beloved by the mainstream media and entertainment industries. End users also need to worry about having valuable digital information “mined” or otherwise ripped-off by a variety of well-organized and financed cybercriminals and gangs, state-sponsored espionage rings and corporate thieves. And let’s not forget supposedly trustworthy organizations, like social media players that sell their users’ data with little care or oversight until they get caught. Facebook is currently sweating the spotlight, but it’s not like the company is any kind of “lone gunman” in this regard. Plus, there are bumblers like Equifax and other massive credit and finance companies whose efforts to secure consumer data are, to put it mildly, as deeply careless as they are dumbly clueless. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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NVIDIA GTC: Recreating…

I’m at NVIDIA’s GTC conference this week and I’ll be damned if their CEO Jen-Hsun Huang didn’t replicate one of the coolest technologies in the Black Panther movie. No, it wasn’t the Vibranium Armor, though that’d been really cool too, no it was the VR remote driving car technology. You recall the scene where the Black Panther’s sister, off in Wakanda, was able to take over remotely a Lexus driving it from a special remote capsule which made it feel like she was actually in the remote car? Well Jen-Hsun showed that in NVIDIA’s lab they have created one of these things. They also showcased the car render around the driver and the driver being able to remotely drive the car. What was kind of interesting was the car that was rendered was a Lexus, and the car that was driven was a Ford. Kind of implies one of the ways to save money in the future would be to buy a cheap car but have in rendered as an expensive car. Ford would be OK with that, Lexus not so much. But I think this suggests some really interesting things in our future. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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New Dell PCs – Predictable Evolution and…

The concept of “law” means different things to different people. For some, laws are rules defining conventional/unconventional behavior. For others, they are immutable strictures or even barriers begging to be tested. But I’d argue that the most important (and, ironically, the least discussed) aspect of law is its predictability. That is, laws clearly delineate expectable outcomes with certain events or behaviors. You “can’t drive ‘55”? Don’t be surprised by a traffic ticket and hefty fine when you’re caught. Feel like scamming strangers, neighbors or family members? Maybe a change of scenery for the next 5-10 years would do you good. Rush hour traffic frustrations might make road rage seem reasonable. But in real life with the cops on hand? Not so much. Which brings me to Moore’s Law—the best remembered contribution Intel co-founder Dr. Gordon Moore made to his company and industry. As with more prosaic laws, some in IT considered Moore’s observation to be somehow immutable even though he himself, along with Arthur Rock, understood that economic reality would eventually overtake and erode its value. But the larger benefits of Moore’s Law were found in the predictable insights it provided semiconductor partners and resellers, as well as potential buyers. If you’re thinking of purchasing a new PC or system, how do today’s products match what you can reasonably expect in 12 to 18 months? Do you really need latest/greatest features and performance? Are those qualities needed by a select few or are they important to mainstream users, too? Those points are reflected in Dell’s latest PCs based on Intel’s latest 8th generation “Coffee Lake-H” Core processors. Interestingly, the new solutions’ benefits are designed to touch a wide range of mobile PC customers, including consumers, business people and gamers. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM THINK 2018 and the Era of Man + Machine

Computing “eras” are a common concept among those who work in or focus on the IT industry. One progression starts with the mainframe era (late 1950s to the present) and the client/server era (1980s to present). However, the notion breaks down a bit in the third era which is variously called the digital, information and Internet era due to the inclusion of divergent ecommerce, cloud computing, mobility, analytics, IoT and other essentially web-enabled processes. That confusion isn’t especially surprising since the first two eras are associated with specific systems or platforms that fundamentally altered the way enterprises and other organizations operated. In contrast, web-enabled compute processes tend to be squishier in terms of the platforms they require which continue to undergo massive evolutionary changes. That touches on a key point of IBM’s THINK 2018 conference last week in Las Vegas. During her keynote, IBM CEO Ginni Rometty and guest commentators described how the company is working with global customers and partners to embrace a “new era of man + machine, an era of data and AI (artificial intelligence).” That’s a fascinating idea, especially given the growing interest and investments in AI, advanced analytics and associated machine and deep learning processes. But are we really at the cusp of a new computing era or was Rometty engaging in mere cheerleading? Plus, if the former is true, how well positioned is IBM to provide its customers and partners the tools and technologies they need to succeed in the era of man + machine? To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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