Lenovo DCG and the Benefits of “Failing Fast”

IT industry vendors evolve in different ways and for different reasons but corporate acquisitions can affect that process substantially in both expected and unexpected ways. For example, purchasing new products and/or intellectual property can enable the acquirer to enter unfamiliar markets far quicker than if organic development were pursued. Such deals can also substantially bolster the buyer’s reputation, especially if it purchases a solid brand and carefully manages product quality and customer relationships. But virtually every deal encounters at least some turbulence related to customer- and technology-integration issues. How and how well a vendor negotiates those challenges should be points of interest for IT customers and partners alike. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM Introduces Transparent Cloud Tiering for DS8880…

Archiving data from mainframe storage systems has been traditionally limited to an on premises physical or virtual tape tier. However, IBM has overcome that limitation with the introduction of Transparent Cloud Tiering (TCT) software that runs on DS8880 storage systems for z Systems. TCT widens the archiving storage targets to cloud environments and that brings the benefits of hybrid cloud with it, such as creating more and better options for managing both capital and operating expenses. Why IBM is doing this reflects the fact that data tends to change in value over time. Keeping older data on primary production storage is expensive not only in terms of storage costs, but also in terms of the resources needed to manage that data (such as for backup and disaster recovery). The solution is to archive less frequently used data to a different (and less expensive tier) of storage, but also making sure that the information can be easily recalled upon request. In the mainframe world, archiving is optimized only for the use of tape. That means an on premises solution, which while useful, lacks some of the benefits of a hybrid cloud solution that IBM TCT supports. Let’s consider that more closely. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Killing The Magic In Apple

Last decade Apple was largely known for a cadence of hit products. You had the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, and the iPad closing out the decade in 2010. Steve Jobs passed in 2011. From then on, we’ve had the Apple Watch and, most recently, the Apple HomePod. The Apple watch is nowhere near the hit the iPad was and realize that the iPad itself seemed to go into decline shortly after Steve Jobs passed. The HomePod is too early (surveys don’t look great for it at the moment but it is early) into the market but given it is running against the dominant Amazon Echo which does more for about half the price prognoses isn’t very good for this product which, like the watch, broke the model of creating something that Apple could make look like everyone needed one. At the core of this problem I think is a sharp pivot from a CEO who was a product guy and a CEO who is more of a process guy and a change in focus from product/customer, to Margin/Investor particularly large investors. Let me explain because Apple is hardly alone with this. For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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IBM DB2 Direct vs. Oracle: Innovation Is the Best Revenge

The tech industry has long promoted the concept and value of “co-opetition” – a process in which even viciously competing vendors can, in some areas, willingly cooperate in mutually beneficial ways. There are countless examples where the co-opetition dynamic works as advertised, some of them going back for decades. For example, system vendors that develop their own networking switches, including Dell, HP and IBM also sell Brocade, Cisco and/or Juniper solutions. Similarly, though most major server vendors have their own in-house storage systems, they also support offerings from storage specialists, including EMC, HDS, NetApp and many others. That doesn’t mean that co-opetition partners don’t occasionally get on the wrong side of one another. For example, Cisco’s decision to launch its own Unified Computing System (UCS) servers in 2009 rubbed many of its system vendor partners the wrong way. Then again, Cisco got some of its own back when strategic partner (and then-fellow VCE co-owner) VMware bought Nicera in 2012 to get a leg up in software-defined networking. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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Apple Makes Huge Mistake At WWDC 2017

I’d tuned into the Apple World Wide Developer’s conference a tad late and missed the opening video but when I went back to check my notes on the keynote I had a WTF moment. Watch the start of the Tim Cook keynote for the show. To save you time it starts with a video of a guy who is brought into what looks like a data center, he is kind of an idiot. He unpacks his stuff and then wants to plug in his new age desktop waterfall and pulls the plug on what looks like a server or network tower in order to do this. When that component goes down it causes a cascade failure for all of the iPhones, Apple Watches, and iPads in the world. This collapse turns the world into a Mad Max future where cars don’t run, there appears to be no power, people are revolting, and everything pretty much sucks. The stated message was that the world depends on apps, but what the film seemed to showcase was that there is single point of complete failure for the entire Apple ecosystem and if it goes down our world collapses with it. Let’s talk about why it is really stupid for Apple to give folks the ideas that the platform is massively vulnerable and this vulnerability could destroy lives. You know I might be able to just stop there… For more information, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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