Rescuing IT From A Sea Of Alarms
Jun22

Rescuing IT From A Sea Of Alarms

IT operations management (ITOM) and assorted kin (i.e. IT Operations Automation and IT Operations Analytics) are hot, and getting hotter. According to IDC, the IT operations analytics software market grew more than 41% in 2014 and will be worth $2.5 billion by 2019 as ITOA becomes ‘a more standard part of the IT operations and DevOps toolkit.’ The future is even brighter, according to marketsandmarkets, which predicts that ITOA will average an annual growth rate of 35.2% from 2015 to 2020, soaring from last year’s $2.17 billion to $9.79 billion. ‘The explosive growth of IT operational data, significant shift of organizations’ core businesses towards cloud, and a substantial change from traditional to next generation technologies have provided immense opportunities to the ITOA solutions vendors, who are in turn helping the organizations yield better analytical results and performance.’ It breaks the market down into solutions vendors such as Oracle, IBM, HP, Splunk, SAP SE, Evolven, Microsoft, VMware, ExtraHop, and Microsoft, as well as a few small and medium-sized companies such as Nexthink, AccelOps, Bay Dynamics, AppDynamics, and Sumo Logic that offer comparatively narrower, yet locally-effective solutions and distribution networks in the ITOA ecosystem. Each layer of technology in the data centre is becoming progressively more complex to control and manage, noted consultant Anthony King. ‘The average server environment now has thousands of configuration parameters (e.g. Windows OS contains – 1,500+, IBM WebSphere Application Server – 16,000+, and Oracle WebLogic –  60,000+).’ Then there are the hundreds and thousands of production changes — i.e. eBay experiences 35,000 changes annually — brought about by continuous integration and continuous build practices. The problem is too much data, and not enough answers, said Akhil Sahai, VP, Product Management, Perspica. Current IT operations tools trigger a “sea of alarms” but they can’t distinguish the critical, service impacting events from false positives that do not require the immediate attention of an operator, he told IT Trends & Analysis. An ITOA vendor, Perspica was founded in 2014 to provide operational intelligence across the entire application stack, and deliver self healing. How do we help our customers get visibility into their application infrastructure, move past alarms to answers, and prevent downtime through early warnings, said Sahai. “Our customers are also suffering with alarm overload.” Dealing with false alarms takes up all their time, but we reduce alarms by 99%, said Sahai. In an increasingly application-driven economy, system outages and downtime are costly. Pespecia says that works out to $5,600 a minute, and with an average outage clocking in at 90 minutes, the total is $505,000 in lost revenue, damage to mission-critical data, and legal and regulatory repercussions, with...

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Dell’s IoT Division Celebrates First Anniversary

The IT industry has been in high gear about the potential and commercial opportunities related to the Internet of Things (IoT) for a couple of years now, and for good reason. Why so? First and foremost, IoT supports numerous new applications and intriguing use cases valuable to business which translates into good news for both vendors and their customers. Second, rather than being something entirely new, IoT represents logical, next evolutionary steps forward for IT solutions ranging from the data center to wired and wireless networks, to cloud to business intelligence and analytics, to sensor and machine data to endpoint technologies, including microprocessors and related components. Finally, by their nature, complex IoT problems virtually demand collaborative solutions. That means that no single vendor or platform is likely to dominate, making it possible for vendors of nearly every sort to find a way into the market, and increasing the variety and vitality of potential solutions. That makes the first year anniversary of Dell’s IoT dedicated team worth a closer look. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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128 Technology: Secure New Vector Routing Solutions…

New IT solutions don’t arise in a vacuum. Instead, most are inspired by real world technology and/or business problems. Some niggling, some serious but problems nonetheless. That’s certainly the case in networking where growing problems have inspired alternatives of often questionable effectiveness. Network complexity – continuing and growing Technologies, like cloud, mobility and hosts of new applications, often require users to cross network boundaries. This presents a concerns, that together with the massive growth in security threats are adding substantially to the cry for innovative new network solutions. In other words, doing business the old fashioned way or on old fashioned networks is becoming increasingly unsustainable. Enterprises and service providers that want to capture the benefits of these new forces cope as best they can by creating overlay networks for functions, like GRE, IPsec, MPLS and VxLAN on top of stateless IP networks, including adding scores of “middleboxes” to handle discrete functions such as security, load balancing and others. All this increases complexity, fragility and cost without solving the underlying problems. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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HPE is law-abiding in Las Vegas

At HPE Discover recently the “marketing law of big companies” (which I just made up) was on full display. In essence the premise is that the bigger you are, the harder it can be to make a specific point. I absolutely don’t mean there were no big points to be made, but when you have a bunch of them, it is hard for each to stand out. The amalgam can even be a tad plain: once you boil too many — albeit good — things down, you can get too much generalization. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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Federal cybersecurity boondoggle: the Software Assurance Marketplace (SWAMP)

Way back in February, I wrote a blog about President Obama’s proposed Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP). As part of this plan, the President called for $19 billion for cybersecurity as part of the 2017 fiscal year federal budget, a 35% increase over 2016 spending. While CNAP has a lot of thoughtful and positive proposals, I’m troubled by the fact that federal cybersecurity programs seem to have a life of their own with little oversight or ROI benefits. I often cite DHS’s Einstein project as an example of this type of government cybersecurity waste. In my humble opinion, the feds are spending hundreds of millions of dollars on custom research and development for Einstein when commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) network security products could do the same job at a fraction of the cost. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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HPE Uncorks IoT In A Box
Jun15

HPE Uncorks IoT In A Box

Regardless of what you want to call the rise of the machines — machine to machine (M2M), Internet of Everthing (IoE), Internet of Things (IoT) or my favorite, Skynet (Terminator) — we’re talking big money, and at last week’s HPE Discover the shrinking enterprise IT powerhouse announced an all-in-one appliance designed to address IoT-at-the-edge applications. Called (at least by Hewlett Packard Enterprise) the ‘industry’s first converged systems for the IoT’, the Edgeline EL1000 and Edgeline EL4000 systems ‘integrate data capture, control, compute and storage to deliver heavy-duty analytics and insights at the edge to enable real-time decision making.’ The company also announced enhanced IoT security capabilities, new services and an ‘industry leading partner ecosystem’ — including Accenture, GE and National Instruments — to advance the adoption and impact of the Internet of Things. Cisco claims the IoE will deliver $19 trillion in value in the private ($14.4 trillion) and public ($4.6 trillion) sectors over the next decade. Gartner predicts 6.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide this year, up 30% from 2015, and will reach 20.8 billion by 2020, while marketsnadmarkets estimates that the IoT market will grow from $157.05 billion in 2016 to $661.74 billion by 2021, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 33.3%. No matter which pundit you pick, that’s a lot of devices/data to be connected, manipulated and value to be extracted, and doing it at the edge can enable organizations to become digital disrupters within their industries, said Dr. Tom Bradicich, VP&GM, Servers and IoT Systems, HPE. “It’s really a good time to be us.” He called the Edgeline announcement a new product category. “It’s a fundamental shift… but also converges things that have never been done before.” The appliances are engineered for the edge, “where things are.” By doing the analyzing at the edge, users can avoid latency and security issues, and accelerate time to value, Bradicich added. “Converged is a synonym for integrated, all in the same box.” Not to be confused with the IoT gateways announced in December, the Edgeline EL 1000 is about the size of a shoebox, while its bigger cousin, the EL 4000 comes in a 1U form factor. According to HPE they integrate compute, storage, data capture, control and enterprise-class systems and device management built to thrive in hardened environments and handle shock, vibration and extreme temperatures. Product specs — and availability — are still a work in progress, although Bradicich mentioned up to 64 Intel Xeon cores, graphics coprocessors, and 15 Tb of storage, National’s leading operational technology (OT) PXI data acquisition and control  technology and HPE’s iLO (integrated lights out) technology. The...

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