Datacenter Dilemma: Build, Buy or… Sink
Feb10

Datacenter Dilemma: Build, Buy or… Sink

The digital economy is reshaping the datacenter landscape, according to a study from JLL, a professional services and investment management firm. ‘The industry is finding growth amidst increased rate of “cloud” adoption, massive provider consolidation, coupled with the exodus of major telecommunications companies from the datacenter services sector.’ Multi-tenant datacenter providers grew 6.1% last year, and rang up revenues of $115.3 billion, said Bo Bond, Managing Director and JLL’s Data Center Solutions Group Co-Lead. However, the very large telcos, many of whom went out and acquired datacenter companies instead of building the capabilities internally, are now dumping those assets. “They found that the integration wasn’t that easy,” he told IT Trends & Analysis. So they’re selling off those assets. Other are looking at their real-estate portfolios and deciding that rather than own, why not sell them and lease back the datacenters. The third aspect plaguing the telcos is that they “pay a lot for these businesses and don’t feel they’ve done as well… so they’re getting back to their core business.” Not that all telcos are taking this path. For instance AT&T is in the process of converting its central offices — telephone switching centers — into cloud datacenters. “We’re going to use already existing footprint of central offices across the country as kind of a distributed cloud,” said AT&T’s Igal Elbaz, VP of innovation and ecosystem. A “significant number” of central offices will get electrical and mechanical infrastructure upgrades to convert them to data centers, he said. It’s a different story for enterprises, who don’t have a standalone datacenter business they can sell off, said Bond. For them there are a variety of datacenter deployment options, although from a real-estate optimization perspective, selling the land, if not the center, might make sense. “There is a wide wide adoption of co-location, cloud services, software as a service… why wouldn’t you hand over the management of facilities to companies like that… the HPs of the world, the IBMs of the world…” said Bond. Service providers have better facilities, they might have better talent, and enterprises might choose to focus on their business, and outsource their IT. There are far-reaching changes impacting IT, according to a recent IDC study. In the future, 60% to 65% of IT assets will be off-site and the IT staff will need to manage all of it, said Richard Villars, VP of datacenter and cloud at IDC, and one of the authors of the Worldwide Data Center 2016 Predictions report. Datacenter teams will take on new jobs and need to evaluate partners, as well as provide consistent management and security across all internal and external access...

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Scality: Using…[SDS] to Manage Petabyte-Scale Data

Organizations that have petabyte data storage requirements — and that includes more each day – are unlikely to turn to traditional enterprise storage solutions to manage these environments. Rather, they are more and more likely to turn to software-defined storage that includes the use of object-based storage. And that is where products such as the Scality RING come in. Managing petabyte-scale amounts of data requires a different mindset and way of doing the data and storage management functions, such as data protection, and that is the role of software-defined storage. Vendors large and small are targeting the capacity-driven segment of the revamped enterprise storage space. The fact that Hewlett Packard Enterprise is throwing its weight (i.e., resources, including money) behind Scality qualifies not only as an endorsement of the company’s solutions, but the capacity-driven market itself. For more information, EMAIL davidhill@mesabigroup.com NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT Review. Share this:TweetMoreEmailPrintShare on...

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IBM Spectrum…: Simple, Agile and Efficient

The storage market is in flux as customers move from traditional SAN-based block storage to object storage, storage-rich servers and software defined storage environments­. As a result, flexibility, agility and efficiency are key attributes to consider when purchasing new storage software/hardware and when designing a migration plan to support new workloads and applications. The IBM Spectrum Storage Suite, with its flexible licensing model and tightly integrated product set spanning multiple storage types from a range of vendors, enables businesses to quickly and cost-effectively make this transition, supporting changing business needs and new use cases as required. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT Perspectives Share this:TweetMoreEmailPrintShare on...

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IBM Finds a Suite Spot in Software-Defined Storage

The Spectrum Storage Suite launch looks promising, but IBM still has some distance to go. In particular, it will be critical for the company to continue improving and simplifying the Spectrum Storage user interface. That may seem easier said than done, but the company’s stated plans for sizable storage investment and the success of the revitalized IBM Design organization offers solid reasons for hope. Additionally, the company’s storage organization has suffered declining sales for 3+ years, due in large part to the same issues and pressures impacting the rest of the traditional storage market. Simplified product packaging and pricing obviously isn’t enough to fix such deeply ingrained, systemic issues, but the Spectrum Storage Suite is evidence of a new brand of thinking in IBM Storage. If that’s the case and the Spectrum Storage Suite becomes simply the first or latest of a series of innovative, software-defined storage solutions, IBM and its storage organization should be on the road to recovery. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT Review. Share this:TweetMoreEmailPrintShare on...

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Cisco Furthers its IoT Ambitions with Jasper Acquisition

Cisco announced it was acquiring Jasper, a an Internet of Things (IoT) platform provider for $1.4 billion (USD). How does a software platform for IoT benefit a networking vendor like Cisco? As I wrote in a prior blog looking back at Cisco Live, their focus for the future emphasizes the importance of architectures, solutions, and outcomes, as opposed to being a vendor of networking equipment, so this brings them one more step closer to creating an IoT architecture that’s based on solutions (and not simply devices) and to put more weight on their software assets. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE Share this:TweetMoreEmailPrintShare on...

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Cisco’s New Beast Mode: Investment Protection
Feb03

Cisco’s New Beast Mode: Investment Protection

Cisco has made a number of storage networking announcements — including a SAN switch code-named “The Beast” — that feature a capability that is seldom offered by Tier one vendors with a stranglehold on their customers — a seamless upgrade path. The typical approach is ‘rip and replace’, selling the latest capabilities at the cost of throwing out the buyer’s existing investment in products (money, services, money, expertise, money, etc.). Known as vendor (or proprietary or customer) lock-in, it is one of the first items on the customer’s checklist when searching for new vendors. The new offerings, that include the 40G Nexus 5672UP-176G and UCS Fabric Interconnect 6300 Series, are what’s commonly referred to as future proof, or providing investment protection. The Beast is a great example, according to Adarsh Viswanathan, Senior Manager, Product Management and Marketing for Storage, Cisco. The  MDS 9718 Multilayer Director is the industry’s first 32G-ready SAN Director that supports native REST API, as well as scaling up to 768 ports of 16G FC. “When you put The Beast in  your datacenter, you’re putting it in for 5-7 years operations,” he told IT Trends & Analysis. According to the company, the programmable 9718 ‘is architected and built to last 10 plus years’ supporting 10G, 16G, 40G speeds today and ‘32G in the near future’, and offers 3x the performance and 200% more ports than the competitors. It’s still early days for 32Gb on the storage side, said Viswanathan. The majority of the market is still doing 8Gb, with 35-40% doing 16Gb, and that segment is growing fast. While Cisco plans to make some 32Gb announcements later this year, he believes it won’t really take off on the storage side until 2017-18. The Beast customers can start off at 16Gb, and when they’re ready to upgrade, they just have to install some software and they’re ready to go (and maybe the odd 3sGb line card or two). According to a canned quote from Deni Connor, founding analyst, Storage/Systems Strategies NOW, storage pros are dealing with storage growth and network infrastructure convergence, as well as having to support cloud and flash storage-based services. “Cisco’s multi-protocol Storage Networking innovations across Cisco MDS, Nexus and UCS product lines will help customers meet organizational growth and more quickly adapt to business priorities.” Key use cases for The Beast include: grow and consolidate; port expansion; and flash deployment, said Viswanathan. Large enterprises and financial services companies love the 9718’s footprint and storage. He also expects the UCS announcement will continue to drive Cisco’s datacenter server sales. “We’re giving them products they can use today plus give them protection down the road,”...

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