Cloudistics Launches Ignite 3.0 On-Prem Cloud Platform

IT industry trends seldom follow a straight line. Instead, they can be and are blown hither and yon by many factors, including the strength of the underlying technologies, vendors’ investment and commitment and market enthusiasm. But perhaps most important of all are the dynamic feelings and changing needs of IT customers. That’s why the form and functions of solutions often change radically after they initially appear. Cloud computing provides an excellent example of how this has worked. While the term came into common use over a decade ago, after Amazon introduced its publicly-available Elastic Compute Cloud in 2006, cloud-based services and solutions have gone through numerous permutations since then. However, organizations that wanted to gain the benefits of cloud in their own private data centers were in a quandary, since implementing systems from the ground up required substantial resources and technical expertise. IT vendors, including Cisco, Dell EMC and IBM responded first with converged systems and then hyperconverged appliances designed to simplify on-premises cloud deployments, and their solutions gained significant market traction. But is there another, better way for supporting on-prem cloud? Cloudistics, which launched last year, would argue there is—an approach the company calls Superconverged delivered via its Ignite cloud software platform and Model-S hardware components. The launch this week of Cloudistics’ new Ignite 3.0 software offers a chance to take a closer look at the company and its offerings. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Pund-IT...

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CybSec Scores An ‘F’
Feb02

CybSec Scores An ‘F’

With the the RSA Conference 2017 just a week away, cybersecurity surveys are showing up everywhere, including Cisco’s 10th study, 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report. However, while the networking giant wants to paint a more positive picture, my big takeaway is that the bad guys are winning. There are a number of positive developments in the survey — with input from 3,000 CISOs and SecOps from 15 countries, as well as telemetry data — but the key findings are, if not surprising, at the very least cause for increased concern. The key findings Cisco focused on were: -over one-third of organizations that experienced a breach in 2016 reported substantial customer, opportunity and revenue loss of more than 20%; and, -90% of these organizations are improving threat defense technologies and processes after attacks by separating IT and security functions (38%), increasing security awareness training for employees (38%), and implementing risk mitigation techniques (37%). The Cisco findings that concerned me were: -just 56% of security alerts are investigated and less than half of legitimate alerts remediated; -more than 50% of organizations faced public scrutiny after a security breach; operations and finance systems were the most affected, followed by brand reputation and customer retention; -for organizations that experienced an attack, the effect was substantial: 22% of breached organizations lost customers — 40% of them lost more than 20% of their customer base; 29% lost revenue, with 38% percent of that group losing more than 20% of revenue; and, 23% lost business opportunities, with 42% percent of them losing more than 20%. Cisco is also touting (justifiably) that it has reduced the ‘time to detection’, the window of time between a compromise and the detection of a new threat, from a median of 14 hours in early 2016 to as low as six hours in the last half of the year. That’s good, but hardly good enough: while the industry average for TTD is 201 days (with a range of 20 to 569 days), in  almost all breaches (93%), it took attackers minutes or less to compromise systems, and data exfiltration occurred within minutes in 28% of the cases. These issues are not a new story, said Cisco’s Security Business Group Architect, Franc Artes. He told IT Trends & Analysis that there are ongoing issues around budgets, trained personnel and the complexity of security environments, “but at the end of the day it’s really a human issue. We’re leaving a lot on the cutting room floor.” People are a big problem when it comes to CybSec. They both cause most of the security vulnerabilities — 55% of all attacks were carried out by either...

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Dell EMC: Convergence Is Reshaping The Datacenter
Jan26

Dell EMC: Convergence Is Reshaping The Datacenter

Trey Layton says the future of the datacenter is all about convergence and while he congratulated HPE for last week’s SimpliVity acquisition, he didn’t appear too optimistic about its prospects for success in the still small but rapidly expanding hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) subsegment. “As related to Simplivity, we rarely see them in a deal… we don’t see them when it comes down to evaluation and comparison”, said the CTO of Dell EMC’s Converged Platforms & Solutions Division (CPSD), the group currently sitting atop the integrated infrastructure market, which includes HCI. As the world rushes to all-digital, all-the-time, somewhere there is a datacenter powering all that software making DX possible. While numbers of the overall market are sketchy, a slew of recent surveys reinforce the growing need for datacenters of all sizes: -the global datacenter market will grow at a CAGR of 10.72% during the period 2016-2020; -the modular and containerized datacenter market will grow at a 12% CAGR between 2017-2021; -the mini datacenter — a self-contained system designed to be from a single rack (micro datacenter) to up to 40 rack enclosure (containerized and aisle containment solution) — market will grow at a CAGR of 17.17% during the period 2017-2021; and, -the hyperscale datacenter market — also called cloud 2.0 — will explode 4100% between 2016-2023, from $869.7 million in 2016 to $359.7 billion in 2023. Increasingly, these datacenters are turning to integrated, or converged solutions that IDC breaks down into four segments: -integrated infrastructure and certified reference systems are pre-integrated, vendor-certified systems containing server hardware, disk storage systems, networking equipment, and basic element/systems management software; -integrated platforms are integrated systems that are sold with additional pre-integrated packaged software and customized system engineering optimized to enable such functions as application development software, databases, testing, and integration tools; and, -hyperconverged (AKA hyperconverged infrastructure or HCI) systems collapse core storage and compute functionality into a single, highly virtualized solution; a key differentiator of hyperconverged systems is their ability to provide all compute and storage functions through the same server-based resources. Not liking to play well with others, Gartner prefers to label HCI as hyperconverged integrated systems (HCIS). However, whether HCI or HCIS, this segment is still relatively small: hyperconverged sales grew 104.3% year over year during Q3, generating $570.5 million worth of sales, or 22% of the total converged market, according to IDC. It will account for just 24% of the integrated systems market by 2019, but it will reach ‘mainstream use’ and is expected to be worth close to $5 billion, stated Gartner. According to the latest available numbers (Q3), the combined integrated infrastructure and certified reference systems market accounted...

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Cisco AMPs Up Security From Datacenter To Endpoint
Nov10

Cisco AMPs Up Security From Datacenter To Endpoint

Having successfully targeted and gone on to dominate the networking and datacenter server markets, Cisco has set its sights on security, and from a new marketing slogan to its latest end-point protection product and pricing announcements, the company is committed to dominating this market too. “The two things that I think are going to be most important: Number one is security … and then moving fast in innovating over and over,” said Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins. Over the years, Cisco has mastered the art of using market transitions to capture share, and it appears it is well on its way to doing so in the security market, said Zeus Kerravala, founder and principal analyst of ZK Research. The market transition that’s changing security is digital transformation. Digital businesses need to move with speed and be agile, but they also must be secure, but the traditional security model in most companies doesn’t allow this, he noted. Earlier this year the company changed its brand promise to: ‘We securely connect everything to make anything possible.’ Robbins added “securely” to the sentence, and the security team is now involved in virtually everything Cisco does. Security-by-design is the standard, he said. With its primary revenue generator, networking, under attack, and a slowdown in its formerly high-flying UCS and HCI server sales, security has been a bright spot. “Cisco is making good progress and achieving strong results along the way,” blogged Jon Oltsik, Senior Principal Analyst and the founder of Enterprise Strategy Group’s cybersecurity service, and is executing accordingly to take their [along with IBM] cybersecurity businesses to $5 billion and beyond. The company’s security business is now at a $2 billion run rate, doubling its AMP for Endpoint customers from 8,000 in November 2015 to 17,000 as of August 2016. It was Cisco’s largest growth area (up 16% year over year) during its recent fiscal fourth quarter, to $540 million, the third straight quarter of double-digit revenue growth. This growth comes at a good time, because while spending may be inching upward when it comes to overall IT budgets, security is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 8.3% through 2020, from $73.6 billion in 2016 to more than $100 billion. Other estimates put this year’s cybersecurity spend at $122.45 billion, and a 10.6% CAGR to $202.36 billion  by 2021. If the cybersecurity market has been looking good to Cisco, the endpoint security market, which is ripe for disruption, could be even more attractive. “In 2016, IDC expects security start-ups to continue to penetrate the enterprise endpoint security market segment as enterprises seek innovative solutions to detect ransomware and targeted...

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Cisco: On-Prem Storage 50% Better TCO Than Cloud

Cybersecurity may be Cisco’s current poster-child for revenue growth, but the company was also busy in the datacenter, with the launch of a storage-optimized server category, the UCS (Unified Computing System) S-Series. Designed to address the needs of data intensive workloads such as Big Data, and for deploying software-defined storage, object storage, and data protection solutions, Cisco is positioning its solution as ‘Data. Unstored.’ Less than 40% of stored enterprise data is ever used to create insight, but new applications such as video analytics, diagnostic imaging, streaming analytics, and machine learning demand and create data that is “un-stored” and actively processed in real time, states the company. It says traditional static IT infrastructure no longer works, while public cloud storage solutions can become expensive. The modular server, which features up to 600 terabytes of local storage in a 4-rack-unit (4RU) form factor, offers a number of benefits, including: -over 50% lower total cost of ownership (TCO) compared to public cloud (specifically Amazon Web Services); -reduces CapEx by up to 34%; -lowers ongoing management by up to 80%; -reduces cabling by up to 70%; -takes up to 60% less space; and, -consumes up to 59% less power. It’s easy to understand why Cisco might be interested in another server application. While server revenue declined 0.8% year over year, the public cloud services market is expected to grow 17.2% this year, to $208.6 billion, with the highest growth coming from cloud system infrastructure services (infrastructure as a service [IaaS]), which is projected to grow 42.8%. Data and business analytics (BDA) revenues will grow from $130.1 billion in 2016 to more than $203 billion in 2020, a compound annual growth rate of 11.7%. Amazon Web Services is the undisputed leader of public cloud services, with 45% of worldwide revenues, twice as much as Microsoft, Google and IBM combined. Together, the three competitors amount to less than 20% percent of infrastructure-as-a-service, or IaaS, revenues in Q3 2016. “There’s a perception that the cloud is not only faster, but also a lower cost versus on-premise and that’s just not the case,” said Todd Brannon, director of product marketing at Cisco. To house 420 TB of cloud storage for three years on Amazon Web Services’ Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) costs around $550,000, compared with about $250,000 to house the data on the on-premise S-Series, Cisco said. In a one-on-one with IT Trends & Analysis Brannon said the modular approach will “allow customers to rightsize the infrastructure for the workload.” It’s less than half the price of public cloud, and provides “a completely modular platform approach to storage-optimized service.” Cisco is promising very attractive TCOs...

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