Data Protection: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Jun29

Data Protection: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

’The Good, The Bad and The Ugly’ was Clint Eastwood’ last and best spaghetti western, and it’s also a very popular description of the cybersecurity industry, to which I will now shamelessly expropriate to describe the findings from EMC’s new global enterprise backup survey, ‘Are You Protected?’. Similar to virtually every other security study I see, the survey reports improvements in some areas, some problems in other areas, and the usual plug for new solutions that will make you more secure, less vulnerable or more likely fall somewhere in between. The survey results are very topical, said Peter Smails, VP, Marketing, Core Technologies, EMC. It also gives the company, which will soon become part of Dell, an opportunity “to talk about everything we’re doing to address those challenges.” While I found it interesting that this conversation was held with EMC, and not RSA, it’s security business, Smails told IT Trends & Analysis who better to address data protection than the company that stores most of that data. The key findings of the survey of IT decision makers at 2,200 organizations included: -incidents of traditional data loss and disruption are down since 2014, but new challenges mean 13% more businesses experienced loss overall; -over half of businesses fail to protect data in the cloud despite more than 80% indicating they will rely on SaaS-based business applications; -36% have lost data in the last year as the result of a security breach; -73% are not very confident they can protect flash storage environments; and, -the average cost of data loss is more than $914,000. People are getting smarter about data protection, said Smails, but they continue to experience data loss. “You need to be vigilant. The world is evolving quickly.” According to a new RSA survey, 75% of survey respondents have a significant cybersecurity risk exposure, and nearly half characterized essential Incident Response (IR) capabilities as ‘ad hoc’ or ‘non-existent’. “We need to change the way we are thinking about security, to focus on more than just prevention – to develop a strategy that emphasizes detection and response,” stated RSA President Amit Yoran. As noted in Sea Of Alarms, one of cybersecurity’s biggest problems isn’t finding a problem, but rather finding and dealing with the most pressing problem. According to a recent survey, nearly 74% of those surveyed reported that security events/alerts are simply ignored because their teams can’t keep up with the suffocating volume. Then there was the new ‘new’ study I just received which identified complext IT security as a growing problem. According to security vendor IS Decisions’ survey of 250 US organizations, on average each employee loses 21.88...

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HPE: All Flash, (And) Substance Too
Mar16

HPE: All Flash, (And) Substance Too

The enterprise storage market has been in commodity hell since at least the mid-1980s, the tape, disk and now solid-state/flash version of Moore’s Law of constantly decreasing prices and margins with constantly increasing capacities and capabilities. To stem the bleeding, new and existing storage vendors have been flocking to flash technology, in hybrid — mixed flash and disk — and all-flash drives, with the latest such announcement coming from Hewlett Packard Enterprise. However, while total enterprise storage systems factory revenue declined 2.2% year over year to $10.4 billion during the fourth quarter of 2015, and capacity shipments increased 10.7% YoY, HPE was the only top-five vendor that grew its storage revenues.Congratulations (and I’m not saying that just because I own HP/E shares). “The enterprise storage market closed out 2015 on a slight downturn, as spending on traditional external arrays continues to decline,” said IDC’s Liz Conner, Research Manager, Storage Systems. “Over the past year, end user focus has shifted towards server-based storage, software-defined storage, and cloud-based storage. As a result, traditional enterprise storage vendors are forced to revamp and update their product portfolios to meet these shifting demands.” Flash has also been the beneficiary of enterprise storage customers, according to IDC’s most recent numbers. The All Flash Array (AFA) market generated $955.4 million in revenue during the quarter, up 71.9% YoY, while the Hybrid Flash Array (HFA) segment of the market rang up $2.9 billion in revenue, representing just over a quarter (28%) of the total market. Storage was a big part of HPE’s recent success, according to President and CEO Meg Whitman at the company’s Q1 earnings call earlier this month. “We had record revenue for 3PAR, driven by triple-digit constant currency growth in all-flash, which grew at three times the market rates.” Which brings me to HPE’s news, which included 3PAR 20840 converged flash array, StoreOnce 5500 and multi-node 6600 data protection, and the Get Thinner Guarantee program. “At the highest altitude… storage is at the heart of a lot of major datacenter transformations… it’s a great time to be in storage… for HPE”, said Brad Park, Director GTM Strategy and Enablement for HPE Storage. He told IT Trends & Analysis that he sees the move to flash as being similar as the move to virtualization and VMware a decade ago. “I think flash and the move to the all flash datacenter has a lot of parallels.” Flash has come a long way in the last five years, said Park, driven by three elements that make the all-flash datacenter very relevant: performance, affordability and the most topical, functionality. “The third piece and where we think the datacenter...

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Data Protection Perspectives from Dell…

Is ‘Backup’ a four-letter word at Dell? Maybe, depending on who you talk to. If you watched my video summary from Dell’s Analyst Conference in 2014, I was initially excited about their four pillar story being around three platforms [Transform], [Connect], and [Inform] being underpinned by [Protect] that are expanded as Security and Data Protection. That is especially poignant considering ESG’s 2015 IT Spending Intentions’ top two priorities for organizations of all sizes is Information Security and Improve Data Backup and Recovery. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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EMC’s Data Protection… Now “Spans” Cloud-based Workloads

Adding Spanning’s Office365, GoogleApps, and SalesForce protection capabilities to the broad EMC data protection solution portfolio, including Mozy (cloud-based backup), Avamar, Networker, Data Domain, etc., ensures that EMC will be able to protect where file/collab/CRM data is moving, as well as where that data lives today. Congrats to EMC on a smart addition to their portfolio. Here’s the Spanning-EMC announcement. To read the complete article, CLICK...

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What Is Copy Data?

Copy Data is the term used to describe the copies of primary data made for data protection, testing, archives, eDiscovery and analytics. The typical focus of copy data is data protection to recover data when something goes wrong. The problem is that each type of recovery requires a different copy of data. Recovery from corruption requires snapshots. Recovery from server failure requires disk backup. Protection from disk backup requires tape. Finally, recovery from a site disaster requires that all these copies be off-site. Add to the data protection copy problem, all the copies being made for test/development, archives, eDiscovery and now analytics. The end result: copy data is about much more than data protection and providing the capacity to manage all these copies has become a significant challenge to the data center. To read the complete article, CLICK HERE NOTE: This column was originally published in the Storage Switzerland Weekly...

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